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Tag:Lou Groza Award
Posted on: December 8, 2011 5:12 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 11:24 pm
 

2011 College Football Award Winners

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While the Heisman gets its own show, the rest of the major awards in college football will be given out tonight. And while, by most accounts, the Heisman Trophy's destination is seriously lacking in drama, there could be a few surprises in tonight's ceremony.

Awards like the Davey O'Brien, the Doak Walker, the Bednarik and many more are all going to be given away tonight, and we'll be updating this post all night long as every award is handed out.

DAVEY O'BRIEN AWARD (best quarterback)

WINNER: Robert Griffin
, Baylor

This is a pretty good sign for the man considered to be the Heisman front-runner. Griffin emerged victorious in a group consisting of Andrew Luck and Case Keenum, and it's hard to argue with him winning the award. Griffin had a monster season for Baylor throwing for 3,998 yards, 36 touchdowns and set an NCAA record with a QB rating of 192.3.

CHUCK BEDNARIK AWARD (best defensive player)

WINNER
: Tyrann Mathieu, defensive back, LSU

The Bednarik Award belongs to LSU and the number 7. Last year it was Patrick Petersen claiming the award, and this year the Honey Badger took it. Mathieu has been a force on what could be the best defense in the country all year long. Seemingly every time there was a game-changing play created by the LSU defense, Mathieu was either starting it or finishing it. Often times both. 

BILETNIKOFF AWARD (best wide receiver)

WINNER: Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Justin Blackmon liked winning the Biletnikoff Award so much in 2010, he decided to do it again in 2011. Blackmon didn't have as amazing a season in 2011 as he did in 2010, but finishing the year with 113 catches for 1,336 yards and 15 touchdowns is a superhuman way to regress. Blackmon is only the second person to ever win the award in consecutive seasons, with Texas Tech's Michael Crabtree being the first.

RAY GUY AWARD (best punter)

WINNER: Ryan Allen, Louisiana Tech

Ryan Allen is the first player in Louisiana Tech history to win the Ray Guy Award. Allen finished the season averaging 46.3 yards per punt, and downed more punts inside the 20 and 10-yard lines than any other punter in the country.

LOU GROZA AWARD (best kicker)

WINNER: Randy Bullock, Texas A&M

Randy Bullock is the first Texas A&M kicker to win the Lou Groza Award. Bullock made more field goals (25) than any other kicker in college football this season, converting on 86.2 % of them, and hitting 11 of 13 from 40 yards or more.

DOAK WALKER AWARD (best running back) 

WINNER
: Trent Richardson, Alabama

Alabama may have a Heisman-winning running back in its history, but Trent Richardson is the first running back in school history to win the Doak Walker Award. Richardson edged out Montee Ball and LaMichael James for the award. He finished the 2011 season with 1,910 total yards and 23 total touchdowns.

COACH OF THE YEAR

WINNER: Les Miles, LSU

Hard to argue with this one, isn't it? After all, no matter where you fell on the debate between Alabama and Oklahoma State, there's little question who the best team in the country was this season, and that was LSU. So it only makes sense that the man in charge of all that would win the Coach of the Year.

JIM THORPE AWARD (best defensive back)

WINNER: Morris Claiborne, LSU

LSU once agains wins a second consecutive award that Patrick Peterson won last season, but this time it's Morris Claiborne taking the trophy, not Tyrann Mathieu. Not exactly a shock, as Claiborne intercepted 6 passes this season and nearly 30 yards per interception return.

OUTLAND TROPHY (best interior lineman)

WINNER: Barrett Jones, Alabama

Jones is the third player in Alabama history to win the Outland Trophy. Trent Richardson has gotten a lot of attention and acclaim for his performance this season, but somebody had to open those holes for him. Barrett Jones was the best player on a strong Alabama offensive line this season.

MAXWELL AWARD (best all-around)

WINNER: Andrew Luck, Stanford

Andrew Luck joins Jim Plunkett as the second Stanford quarterback to win the Maxwell Award. Luck also won the Walter Camp Award on Thursday. Luck threw for 3,170 yards and 35 touchdowns for Stanford in 2011.
Posted on: July 11, 2011 7:33 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 7:50 pm
 

2011 Lou Groza Award watch list announced

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Here's the 30-man watch list of the 2011 Lou Groza Collegiate Place-Kicker Award, as compiled by the Palm Beach County Sports Commission. The Groza Award has been awarded since 1992 to the best kicker in FBS (formerly I-A) college football.


Michael Barbour, East Carolina
Casey Barth, North Carolina
Rob Beard, Oregon
Maikon Bonani, South Florida
Randy Bullock, Texas A&M
Dan Conroy, Michigan State
Derek Dimke, Illinois
Ross Evans, TCU
Mitch Ewald, Indiana
Trey Farquhar, Idaho
Erik Folk, Washington
Nate Freese, Boston College
Kevin Goessling, Fresno State
Jack Griffin, FIU
Zach Hocker, Arkansas
Dustin Hopkins, Florida State
Danny Hrapmann, Southern Miss
Aaron Jones, Baylor
Ross Krautman, Syracuse
Abel Perez, San Diego State
Grant Ressel, Missouri
Bryson Rose, Ole Miss
David Ruffer, Notre Dame
Jimmy Stevens, Oklahoma
Will Snyderwine, Duke
Dave Teggart, UConn
Justin Tucker, Texas
Blair Walsh, Georgia
Phillip Welch, Wisconsin
Alex Zendejas, Stanford 

Overall, this is a pretty balanced -- and extensive -- list. The Big 12 leads all comers with five listed kickers out of 10, and all of the BCS conferences have at least three representatives on this list. 

Picking a favorite at this point of the process is nearly impossible. Not only is picking a top kicker such a subjective process that Alex Henery was left off the list of finalists entirely last season, but there's just a ton of good kickers this year. Here's the average stat line of these 30 kickers last year:

18.33 FGM, 21.93 FGA, .836 FG%; 43.97-44.97 XP, .978 XP%

Again, that's not an award-winning line; that's the average line of the top 30 non-senior kickers in 2010. Half of these guys missed three FGs or fewer on the entire year, and 14 hit all of their extra points. Whoever advances to the semifinalist and finalist stages is going to do so by the slimmest of margins, and we're talking about a sport with substantial statistical variations from year to year. That's not to say that Dan Conroy's going to go out and miss 10 field goals in a row or anything, but these guys are affected in some degree by the situations they're put into.

Posted on: December 30, 2010 1:55 am
 

Bowl Grades: Alamo Bowl

OKLAHOMA STATE

Offense: The Cowboys weren't actually quite as dominant as the scoreboard (or their reputation) would suggest in the first half, punting four times and getting 14 of their 17 points via a 61-yard thunderbolt to Justin Blackmon and a short-field score following a muffed punt. After three quarters, they still hadn't even cracked 260 total yards, and their final total of 313 fell well below their nation-leading 537-yard average.

But with the Poke defense playing the way it was (and the Arizona offense helping OSU out the way it was), the most important thing for the Cowboy attack was simply to take advantage of its opportunities and not make mistakes, and that they did. Both red zone opportunities were converted into touchdowns, Brandon Weeden (who punctuated a pedestrian-looking stat line with several NFL-quality throws) didn't throw an interception, the Poke ballcarriers never fumbled, and Lou Groza Award finalist Dan Bailey went 3-of-3 with makes from 40, 50, and 44 yards. Combine that with the usual smattering of brilliance from Blackmon -- who finished his sophomore season with 100 yards and at least one touchdown receiving in all 12 games he played, not to mention two more highlight-reel scores in this one -- and it was more than enough to cruise past the bumbling Wildcats. GRADE: A-

Defense:
The book on the Cowboy defense was that it could slow down most running games, but would really struggle against a competent passing game, and between quarterback Nick Foles and All-American receiver Juron Criner that's what Arizona appeared to have.

But that wasn't the way the game played out at all. In the secondary, the much-maligned Poke defensive backs picked off Foles three times, held him to a mediocre 5.6 yards per attempt (that still flatters his performance), and scored as many touchdowns from his passes -- thanks to a Markelle Martin pick-six -- as Arizona did. Criner grabbed nine receptions, but none for longer than 12 yards. Meanwhile, up front, Foles was sacked five times and hurried twice that many times at least. The end result was that a pass defense that appeared to be the most vulnerable part of the Cowboy team was its most vital part in San Antonio.

That's not to say the Cowboys didn't allow their fair share of yards; over a span of six drives in the second and third quarters, Arizona racked up 194 yards and crossed midfield five times. But thanks to the stiffening OSU defense, they scored fewer points on those drives (three) than the Cowboys did (six, thanks to Martin). As defensive performances go, it was just this side of dominating. GRADE: A-

Coaching: The Cowboy staff of head man Mike Gundy, now ex-offensive coordinator Dana Holgorsen, and defensive coordinator Bill Young have a collective reputation for aggressiveness, and they more than lived up to it Wednesday night. Holgorsen tested the 'Cat defense deep and with various misdirection plays, Young dialed up a number of successful blitzes, and Gundy's willingness to go for a 4th-and-2 near midfield up big in the fourth quarter paid off with an Arizona penalty and, eventually, the icing touchdown. The Oklahoma State staff showed by far the more aggressive coaching philosophy, and were rewarded with a far, far more aggressive performance from their team. GRADE: A-

ARIZONA

Offense:
Give the Wildcats some credit: with 369 yards and all the aforementioned forays into OSU territory, it's not like they didn't at least give themselves opportunities. But don't give them much -- or any, if you like -- since they squandered virtually all of them via a variety of mistakes. There was Foles, ruining Arizona's first threatening drive with a one-hopper to an open receiver on 4th-and-5 and throwing all three of his interceptions across midfield. There was the timidity in the running game, with the three Wildcat backs averaging just 3.5 yards on their 28 carries. There were the drops from the receivers, with even Criner joining in. There were the seven penalties, the five sacks, the four total turnovers. There was embattled kicker Alex Zendejas missing from 47 and 34 yards.

In short, there were far more shots aimed at the Wildcats' own feet than at their opponents in the Alamo Dome. When one final consolation touchdown with under five minutes to play -- on Foles' best pass of the night, a long arcing bomb to Richard Morrison -- was called back for a hold along the offensive line, you couldn't have asked for a better single-play summation of the Wildcat offense's night. That kind of sloppiness was simply never going to fly opposite a unit as explosive as Oklahoma State's. GRADE: D+

Defense: Frankly, given the quality of the opposition they were facing, you can't hang the outcome on the Arizona defense. With Weeden playing as well as he was and Blackmon being Blackmon (to say nothing of the likes of Kendall Hunter), to hold the Cowboys to 313 yards and three offensive touchdowns -- one of those coming on a turnover-aided short field -- is quite the accomplishment. A forced turnover somewhere would have been nice, but these Wildcats (active cornerback Joseph Perkins in particular) have nothing to hang their heads about. GRADE: B+

Coaching: Already down 23-7 with less than 10 minutes to play in the third quarter, Mike Stoops faced a decision: go for it on a 4th-and-5 from the Oklahoma State 30, knowing that his team would need all the points they could get given the potency of the OSU offense and the deficit his team faced, or try a 47-yard field goal with a kicker whose confidence had to have been badly shaken from the botched extra points that cost the Wildcats their rivalry game with Arizona State. That Stoops chose the "safe" route of kicking the highly-unlikely field goal (whcih badly missed, of course) tells you all you need to know about the halfhearted, play-not-to-lose, roll-over-and-get-crushed attitude Arizona approached this game with. For all his sideline bluster, Stoops didn't show the kind of actual fieriness and conviction his team needed. (And hey, that's not even mentioning leaving two timeouts on the board at the end of the first half while Stoops raged about a pass interference call.) GRADE: D

FINAL GRADE:
Like so many other bowls this season, the game was firmly in one team's grasp by the end of the first half and entirely out of reach by the time the fourth quarter rolled around. Yawn. Again. At least Weeden-to-Blackmon was worth a look. Grade: C-

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com