Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Marvin Austin
Posted on: July 27, 2011 5:47 pm
Edited on: July 28, 2011 9:32 am
 

Butch Davis fired as UNC football coach

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE: Quotes from the official university release.

Chancellor Holden Thorp

"To restore confidence in the University of North Carolina and our football program, it's time to make a change," said Thorp. "What started as a purely athletic issue has begun to chip away at this University's reputation. I have been deliberate in my approach to understanding this situation fully, and I have worked to be fair to everyone involved. However, I have lost confidence in our ability to come through this without harming the way people think of this institution. Our academic integrity is paramount and we must work diligently to protect it. The only way to move forward and put this behind us is to make a change."

Thorp said the decision was not related to any change in the NCAA investigation, but that it was the result of the cumulative damage to the University's reputation over the past year.

"Athletics and football are an important part of this University, and a successful football program is essential to the overall health of our athletic program," Thorp continued. "That's why we have to put this behind us and move forward."

Athletic Director Dick Baddour

"I want to thank Butch Davis and his family for their four-plus years of service and dedication to the University and the Chapel Hill community," said Baddour. "My staff and I will work with Chancellor Thorp to transition to an interim head coach as soon as possible. It is critical that we do all we can to help our students and other staff members on the football team since preseason training camp begins in just eight days."

The timing of the dismissal comes after a change in leadership and the induction of new members to the school's Board of Trustees.  Below are some details of the new BOT members, via InsideCarolina.com

According to a source, Davis, athletic director Dick Baddour and chancellor Holden Thorp held a closed door meeting on Tuesday afternoon.

The Board of Trustees had a regularly scheduled 1 p.m. meeting on Wednesday at the Carolina Inn in Chapel Hill, including a session that was closed.

The Board of Trustees, a 13-member board that governs the University welcomed new leadership and new members on Wednesday. Wade H. Hargrove, a Raleigh a corporate and national media lawyer and partner with Brooks, Pierce, McLendon, Humphrey & Leonard LLP, was elected chairman. W. Lowry Caudill of Durham, co-founder of Magellan Laboratories and retired president of Pharmaceutical Development for Cardinal Health, and Steven J. Lerner of Chapel Hill, founder and chairman of the Board of Directors of both Capstrat and FGI and managing partner of the Blue Hill Group, were also sworn into office.

------------------------

Butch Davis has been fired as head coach of the North Carolina football team, according to CBSSports.com sources.

The termination comes after the new Board of Trustees met in a closed session today to discuss the future of the football program. Davis remained employed for over a year as North Carolina has undergone NCAA investigation for both impermissible benefits and academic improprieties. Earlier this summer, North Carolina received their Notice of Allegations from the NCAA - which detailed 9 different violations being alleged against the football program.

Posted on: July 14, 2011 9:42 am
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Austin backs Tar Heel teammate on Twitter

Posted by Chip Patterson

On Wednesday, former North Carolina defensive end Michael McAdoo was in Durham County Courts petitioning for reinstatement after being ruled permanently ineligible and having his appeal denied by the NCAA. When Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson denied McAdoo's petition, the 6-foot-7, 245-pound lineman saw his chances of seeing the field as a Tar Heel once again fade away.

The result obviously disappointed McAdoo and his family, but the ruling enraged former teammate Marvin Austin, who took to Twitter to vent his frustration.

(Tweets in chronological order, presented as they appear)
I'm so heated right now..justice will prevail..even if I have to spill the beans

This is so frustrating right now..I can't rap my head around it..I wish I could understand but maybe its not logical enough to understand

Twitter I'm not bitter I just don't like the way my friend, teammate, brother was mislead, misused, and ostracized from the program for the

Same reasons that others got suspended and are able to play for because I know exactly the details in each case and its noway that this young

Man should have his dram snatched from him like the #ncaa has done. I can tell you so many stories that would be mind boggling in comparison

I swear it is simply disheartning that the people our parents put there trust in to protect us really only care there gain solely

Trust me I know…I love my school..I chose to come here when nobody thought it was smart to do..but I just wish the administration stood

And stop the cowardly acts when the are in front of the ncaa and just tell them what you told us…don't turn and twist your story to look

Appealing to the Ncaa and pressure the 21 year old athlete to say and do things that aren't in there best interest…its so much that's not

Said it stings when I think about it Unc true fans understand how we as players love this place it tatted in blood for most guys on the team.

Of all of the players involved in the North Carolina investigation, Austin might have the loudest voice of them all. Not only because he has the largest personality (remember he wants to be a sportscaster one day), but because he has been the highest-profile player involved with the largest dollar signs attached to his improper benefits.

It was also interesting that Austin took this rant to Twitter. After all, wasn't it his account that kick-started things in the first place? When North Carolina began to gather information internally, a decision was made at some point that trying to fight for Austin's eligibility was a lost cause.

Declared permanently ineligible, and now a second-round draft pick of the New York Giants, Austin has a story that certainly would interest the college football world. As the "most guilty" of North Carolina's suspended players, he could cause quite a stir if he does decide to "spill the beans."

Posted on: June 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 9:41 pm
 

Records show Blake spoke to players during trip

Posted by Chip Patterson

A whopping $13,000 in parking tickets wasn't the only interesting revelation from North Carolina's release of documents on Thursday. Phone records show communication between former assistant John Blake and former players Marvin Austin and Cam Thomas during their trip to a California training facility before the 2009 season, J.P. Giglio of the News & Observer in Raleigh reported.

Cellphone records were obtained as part of the lawsuit filed by several local media outlets to release information withheld by the university. They show that Blake contacted numbers tied to Austin while he and Thomas were training with former UNC teammate Kentwan Balmer at Proactive Sports Performance in Westlake Village, Calif. -- a location frequently used by Gary Wichard and Pro Tect Management.

If Blake, or anyone else at UNC had knowledge of Austin and Thomas being with Balmer in California, it would be the responsibility of the North Carolina compliance office to investigate whether the trip was permissible.

Austin has contended as recently as March that no one at UNC knew about his trip with Thomas, but the communication between Blake, Wichard, Austin and Thomas suggests otherwise. Hotel receipts financially link Austin to Wichard's agency and show the dates of the players' stay as July 23 to Aug 1. From July 20 to Aug. 3, Blake's records show 20 calls or texts to Wichard's cellphone, 10 to Austin's and eight to Thomas.

While some have argued that these potential violations can be pinned on Blake, who resigned from the program one game into the 2010 season, the reality is that we may be far from the end of these allegations. Local media has a lot to gain from drawing dots together to try and find something that the NCAA may have missed in their investigation. North Carolina received their Notice of Inquiry from the NCAA on June 7, and sources have reported that the Notice of Allegations could come as soon as this week.

Once North Carolina receives their notice from the NCAA, the closure process can finally begin. It has been reported that the school is expecting the notice to highlight nine different infractions, including failure to monitor charges in relation to Blake, tutor Jennifer Wiley, and former player/runner Chris Hawkins. The notice will also include a suggestion of punishments for the allegations, which could include the loss of scholarships, probation or even a postseason and/or television ban. Once the notice is received, the school will have 90 days to respond and then there will be a date set for the school to appear in front of the Committee on Infractions.

For Tar Heel fans, the hope is that no additional allegations can be drawn from the information released as a result of the lawsuit. The faster that notice comes, the faster the hearing can be set and the entire process can finally be settled.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 2:58 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 9:42 am
 

CBSSports.com College Football 100: 20-11

By the Eye on College Football bloggers

To celebrate the (now fewer than) 100 days remaining until the first Saturday of the new college football season, this is the CBSSports.com College Football 100: our countdown of the 2011 season's 100 most influential players, coaches, administrators, venues, or any other related
things in college football. It's like that other "most influential" list, but, you know, more important. Also: it's supposed to be fun.

We're now down to the nitty-gritty: Nos. 20-11 below, 10-3 tomorrow, then No. 2 Thursday and our No. 1 unveiled Friday. Stay tuned.

20. OLIVER LUCK, athletic director, West Virginia. Luck's influence on college football is two-fold. The first (and most important) has been his effect as the athletic director of West Virginia. Recently, his role as the face of this athletic department has become much more challenging due to the ongoing Bill Stewart/Dana Holgorsen soap opera. In the next few weeks, Luck will have to clean up a he-said/she-said that could end up defining West Virginia football -- and the entire "coach-in-waiting" strategy -- significantly for the near future. If Luck decides that Stewart was trying to convince reporters to dig up dirt on Holgorsen after his hiring in December, he may be faced with the decision of promoting Holgorsen early or -- as some have suggested i- bringing in an entirely new head coach. Somehow, Luck will have to find a way to juggle all of this responsibility while instituting the first year of beer sales at West Virginia athletic events. Despite a negative reaction from many fans, Luck is convinced that the selling beer at the games is going to be the best way to discourage binge drinking before the games and at halftime. It is not entirely uncommon for schools to make this decision, but the logic is often difficult to explain to fans who disapprove of alcohol at college events entirely.

Oliver is also the father of Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. The overwhelming favorite to be the No. 1 pick in the 2012 NFL Draft, Luck shocked the professional ranks with his decision to return to Stanford for (at least) another season. His return shakes up the entire Pac-12 race, and with Terrelle Pryor's off-field issues has made him the frontrunner for next year's Heisman Trophy. The decision for a college player to come back almost always is a family one, and while the elder Luck has kept himself out of his son's affairs for the most part, his influence on Andrew's decision has no doubt changed the football landscape for next season. -- CP

19. THE NFL LOCKOUT, potential season-dissolver, NFL. Think the NFL lockout isn't hugely important to the college game? Watch what happens if/when college games are the only games in town. Watch what happens when all the "Monday morning quarterbacks" are still talking about Saturday instead of Sunday. The fact is that college football is uniquely positioned to siphon tens of millions of football fans from the NFL, even if it's just on a temporary basis. And unlike college basketball and the NBA, where the pro version is a vastly superior product to the amateur version (sorry, but it's true), college football can be every bit as enjoyable as the NFL.

Of course, the lockout situation is still fluid, and there's certainly a possibility that pro football will be "back" well before the college football season starts. And yet, the antitrust lawsuit filed by Tom Brady and friends has a hearing that's scheduled for September 12... four days after the NFL's regular season is supposed to start. The NFL is gearing up for a long work stoppage; college football teams should take full advantage. That means courting the newly disenfranchised fans and filling as many stadiums as possible with them, even if it means dropping ticket prices. That means openly promoting celebrating the fact that college football is never going anywhere, never relocating to another city 1,000 miles away, never locking players out and threatening to cancel a season, and never treating fans half as poorly as the NFL is treating its own right now. -- AJ

18. VONTAZE BURFICT, linebacker/eater of souls, Arizona State. Burfict has developed a bit of a reputation for being a cheap shot artist. It's not exactly an unfair label, as any search of his name on YouTube will provide the evidence of his work. Yet, having a linebacker on your defense that plays with a chip on his shoulder isn't exactly a bad thing, especially when that chip complements the heap of talent that comes with it. Through his first two seasons with the Sun Devils, Burfict has made 151 tackles, leading Arizona State with 90 last season.

Entering the season, Arizona State seems to be a trendy pick in a lot of preseason top-25 polls, and Burfict is one of the reasons why. (Our colleague Dennis Dodd named him the national Preseason Defensive Player of the Year.) While Arizona State's defense was middle of the Pac last season, the rush defense was third best in the conference, and an even better Burfict could make for even better numbers this season. If the Sun Devils are going to live up to the preseason and make some real noise in the Pac-12, the defense is going to have to do its part. And that defense will be led by Vontaze Burfict. -- TF

17. BUTCH DAVIS, head coach, North Carolina. When Davis arrived in Chapel Hill, his charge was to make North Carolina football relevant on a national level. In 2010 North Carolina football has had as many headlines as all the perennial powers--just for many of the wrong reasons. In a year that has been filled with NCAA-related scandal, the Tar Heels are preparing to finally wrap up an investigation on impermissible benefits and academic impropriety that began last summer with Marvin Austin and Greg Little. Throughout this entire process, Davis has remained steady and confident in his team and his job. One year later, Davis has dodged all of the attacks and still stands as the head coach in Chapel Hill.

But despite promises to right the culture of wrongdoing, Davis continues to catch criticism for his ignorance. Defensive lineman Quintin Coples is already a topic of interest after being spotted at a DC-based NFL Draft Party. Considering the "sign-out sheet" that was going to help keep tabs on players, Coples' misstep in judgement reflects poorly on Davis and the program leadership.

But unlike other head coaches in charge of troubled programs, there has been no hard evidence to show any kind of cover-up by Davis. When a player's eligibility has been put in question, the school has pulled the player from the active roster and relied on a "next man up" mentality until NCAA clearance. Not only have Davis and athletic director Dick Baddour been cooperative with the NCAA, but North Carolina won their first bowl game since 2001. With no hard evidence yet to surface, Butch Davis continues to avoid the pressures of investigation with ignorance and wins. As long as both factors continue, Davis will be on the sideline in Chapel Hill. -- CP

16. JIM DELANY, commissioner, Big Ten. The man who stands atop college football's most prosperous conference is back again, and he's got quite a production to unveil this year. The new-look Big Ten has a slew of changes, and all of them--from newcomer Nebraska to the newly named trophies and division names--have Delany's fingerprints all over them. As such, the success or failure of these changes are going to be laid directly at Delany's feet, for better or worse. We're banking on "better."

More CFB 100
Related Links
So why is he only 16th on this list? Because when push came to shove and Ohio State (Delany's flagship football program) started to melt down in the wake of Jim Tressel's transgressions, Delany was nowhere to be found. Sure, he held a teleconference last Sunday, after Tressel was already gone, but remember that it took five months for the Ohio State brass to go from "notified of Tressel's problem" to encouraging him to resign. If Delany was truly upset about what happened in Columbus, shouldn't he have at least put a little public pressure on OSU to move on? Yes, Ohio State should be encouraged to deal with its own problems, but this is the conference of Legends and Leaders, right? Do those names actually stand for anything, or are they just meaningless labels? And if they do stand for something, shouldn't the commissioner enforce them a little more actively than Delany did with OSU? -- AJ

15. MACK BROWN, head coach, Texas. Since becoming the head coach in Austin in 1998, Brown's teams have gone 133-34, won a national title, and earned two Big 12 championships and six division championships. Brown has won the Bear Bryant Award, Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award, and has been the Big 12 coach of the year twice. That's a lot of notches in the belt, but those accolades don't mean much in Austin right now, as a lot of Longhorns fans can't see past 5-7, Texas' record last season. It's hard to believe that a coach who has had as much success at Texas as Brown has could be considered on the hot seat, but if Brown doesn't turn things around this season, he will be.

Brown made the changes he felt were needed after 2010, firing Greg Davis and hiring Bryan Harsin, but he also lost the man who was supposed to replace Brown himself, Will Muschamp, to Florida. So in 2011 Brown will not only have to lead Texas back to its winning ways, but do so with two new coordinators. If he can, Texas will be back in the national title picture. If not, there may even be a job opening in Austin this winter--one that would have a seismic impact on the rest of the college football world. -- TF

14. RUSSELL WILSON, quarterback, free agent. Wilson is worth paying attention to, first and foremost, because he's a quality quarterback whose addition could single-handedly change the fortunes of whatever team he happens to join. But his situation is also worth watching because -- like some sort of sci-fi superhero experiment -- Wilson is the first and possibly last of his kind. Never before has a player of Wilson's impeccable on- and off-field credentials been available as a no-strings-attached, one-year free agent. And judging by the SEC's decision last week to eliminate single-season transfers like Wilson's and Jeremiah Masoli's, one may never be available again.

That alone makes Wilson one of the year's biggest stories. But the impact he makes on the field could be just as key. Wilson has already visited Auburn (reportedly) and is due to visit Wisconsin soon (reportedly). Given the ample (if unproven) offensive talent that would surround Wilson in either location, both teams would suddenly see their expectations rise another rung up the ladder and would become dramatically more dangerous threats to the favorites in their respective divisions. Wilson's free agent adventure might still come to nothing (returning to football from the minor leagues means giving back a huge portion of his Colorado Rockies signing bonus), but until it reaches its conclusion, we're going to be riveted all the same. -- JH

13. TRENT RICHARDSON, running back, Alabama. There's no polite way to say it, so we'll just say it: the state of Alabama has dominated the sport of college football for the past two years. Each of the last two Heisman Trophies are sitting in Cotton State trophy cases. They just happen to be a stone's throw away from each of the last two BCS championship trophies, also in those same cases. In 2009, Alabama gave us the sport's most complete, dominant defense in years. In 2010, Auburn gave us the sport's most dynamic, polarizing player in years. So what are they going to do for an encore?

Thanks to Trent Richardson, they might just make it three-for-three on both the BCS title and Heisman Trophy fronts. Even as Mark Ingram took home the famous stiff-armer in 2009, Richardson was bullying his way into the backfield (as a true freshman) all the same; he finished the season with 144 carries, many of them coming in critical situations in the season-saving comeback against Auburn and the national title tilt against Texas (where he topped the 100-yard mark). After a productive 2010, Richardson now has the starter's job to himself, one of the best offensive lines in the country opening holes for him, and a defense on the other side of the ball that could be the equals of 2009 (and should give Richardson ample opportunity to close out nationally-televised wins). Deja vu all over again, for both Alabama the team, and Alabama the state? Definitely possible ... and possibly even likely. -- JH

12. CHIP KELLY, head coach, Oregon. Chip Kelly hasn't been a head coach for long but he's already accomplished quite a bit. He's taken a program with only recent success and turned the Ducks into the Pac-12's flagship program after a couple of off-years from USC. With back-to-back BCS bowls under his belt and a high flying offense that he gets the lion's share of credit for, it's no wonder he was recognized by Fast Company and several other organizations for his creativity and genius on and off the football field.

2011 will put Kelly's coaching abilities to the test, though, as the Ducks look to finish what they couldn't last season. Oregon has to replace several starters along the offensive and defensive lines but returns starting quarterback Darron Thomas and Heisman Trophy finalist LaMichael James at running back. This will be the first year for the Pac-12 and Kelly would like nothing more than to have his name on the inaugural trophy. His reputation has taken a hit this offseason after allegations regarding payments to Will Lyles for his scouting service, and the head coach would like nothing more than to put those things behind them--with the same quickness with which Kelly attacks everything he does. -- BF

11. MARK EMMERT, president, NCAA. Since taking over less than a year ago as the NCAA's new president, Mark Emmert has barely had time to catch his breath. He walked right into a widening agent scandal at North Carolina, had to deal with the fallout from the severe sanctions at USC, and handled the controversial reinstatement cases involving Kentucky basketball's Enes Kanter and eventual Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton. Needless to say, Emmert has had a lot on his plate ... and that's not even getting to the mess at Ohio State.

Emmert has been criss-crossing the country lately, meeting with administrators, student-athletes and others to get a sense of what is going on in college athletics since he took over. He has a big year upcoming as he looks to finally make an imprint with a new NCAA legislative cycle. Emmert has constantly said the organization won't pay athletes under his watch but he has talked with the SEC, Pac-12, Big Ten and others about full cost of attendance scholarships, so that could be a significant push he makes this year. On top of that, he'll have to deal with an inquiry from the Department of Justice into why the organization doesn't run an FBS football playoff. With all that is on his plate, Emmert will continue to have a regular presence in the headlines. -- BF

The 100 will continue here on Eye on CFB tomorrow. Until then, check out Nos. 100-91, 90-81, 80-71, 70-61, 60-51, 50-41, 40-31 and 30-21. You can also keep up with the 100 by following us on Twitter.



Posted on: May 19, 2011 7:22 pm
 

Report: NCAA interviews UNC DE Quinton Coples

Posted by Adam Jacobi

A report by Joe Schad of ESPN today indicated that North Carolina defensive end Quinton Coples is gaining unwanted attention from the NCAA after he was seen in online pictures from a post-draft party earlier this month. Coples is with former North Carolina players Marvin Austin and Robert Quinn in the pictures, and a man the NCAA has investigated as a possible runner for agents is also visible in some pictures.

The issue here is that the party was held in Washington D.C., and that Austin and Quinn were both barred from playing in 2010 after having taken illegal benefits from agents. That Coples would show up at such a party is enough to garner the NCAA's attention, though there's no indication as yet that his eligibility is in doubt. Still, he's got some questions to answer:

Photographs of Coples with Austin and Quinn that appeared on Facebook and the web site EliteDCMag.com prompted the inquiry. The party is labeled as taking place at "Ultrabar" nightclub. Also seen in photos with players is at least one alleged runner the NCAA has investigated.

The NCAA wants to know how Coples paid for his travel to the party, who paid for his admission and his hotel, and if he accepted any free food or drink. 

This sort of controversy is the last thing North Carolina needs after the massive scandal of illegal benefits cost 13 players (mostly high-profile starters) their eligibility, UNC assistant John Blake his job, and agent Gary Wichard his license. Head coach Butch Davis saved his job by acting swiftly once the illegal benefits were discovered and not participating in any objectionable behavior, but if this type of problem continues to cost North Carolina's top players their eligibility, UNC administration officials may have significantly less patience for Davis this time around.

Posted on: October 11, 2010 11:11 am
Edited on: October 11, 2010 11:24 am
 

UNC: Austin dismissed. Little, Quinn ineligible

Posted by Chip Patterson

Two days after climbing over the .500 mark with a 21-16 victory over the Clemson Tigers, the tone quickly changed in Chapel Hill with the news that three of the Tar Heels' suspended stars will never again take the field in a North Carolina uniform.

Defensive tackle Marvin Austin has been suspended indefinitely from the team since September 1 for violating team rules.  A university release on Monday announced that Austin has been dismissed from the program for "violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules."  The basis for the dismissal was information gathered from the join NCAA investigation into improper contact with agents.  One interesting part of the announcement: the release states that Austin's case was never considered by the NCAA's reinstatement committee.  Making it appear as though this fate has been known for some time.

Additionally, the university announced that running back Greg Little and defensive end Robert Quinn have been ruled permanently ineligible by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff.  According to the details of the release, the two players not only accepted gifts and benefits, but also were not entirely truthful with the NCAA during the investigation process.

(via UNC release)
The university declared both student-athletes ineligible for violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules. According to the facts submitted by the university, the total value of the benefits is approximately $4,952 for Little and $5,642 for Quinn.

Little accepted diamond earrings, as well as travel accommodations for the Bahamas, Washington D.C. and two trips to Miami, among other benefits. Quinn accepted two black diamond watches, a pair of matching earrings and travel accommodations for a trip to Miami, among other benefits.

Based upon information gathered by the institution and the NCAA Agent, Gambling and Amateurism staff during its joint investigation, unethical conduct charges were found against both student-athletes for providing false and misleading information. According to the facts submitted by the university, each student-athlete was not truthful during three separate interviews with university and NCAA enforcement staff members. Further, Little and Quinn only provided more accurate information when presented with evidence that was contrary to their assertions.
If there is anything we have learned from the recent cases of Bruce Pearl and Dez Bryant, it is that the NCAA does not appreciate dishonesty.  While UNC AD Dick Baddour and head coach Butch Davis have openly boasted their "full cooperation" with the NCAA investigation, it appears as though the players in question were not as helpful.  It does not come as a huge surprise to those near the program that the three players will not see any action in 2010, but the football program's image continues to be scarred as more details emerge from the investigation.  

There will be a press conference held at 11:30 a.m. ET to address the punishments, and there will no doubt be questions related to the dreaded "lack of institutional control."  The dishonesty from Little and Quinn to the NCAA not only killed their chances of getting back on the field, but reflected poorly on Butch Davis and the leadership in the program.  

Stay tuned to CBSSports.com for more as this story develops.

For more breaking news and analysis follow us on Twitter @CBSSportsNCAAF or subscribe to our RSS Feed.

Posted on: September 17, 2010 11:24 am
Edited on: September 17, 2010 11:47 am
 

Report: Marvin Austin giving testimony Friday

Posted by Chip Patterson

The NCAA may have claimed one of their first true victims in the agent-scandal when Weslye Saunders was dismissed from the South Carolina football team earlier this week.  While no official ruling had been made from the NCAA, it is assumed that the allegations directly led to his dismissal.

But it's not just the NCAA that can get involved in agent-related scandals in college athletics.  There are 36 states which have passed the Uniform Athlete Agent Act, which prohibits, among other things, agents from supplying anything of value to an athlete before a contractual negotiation is reached.  Any violation of the act can leave the agent subject to civil or criminal charges.  In some cases, violation of the act can be ruled a felony.

North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall announced early in the scandal that her office would launch an investigation of their own, to determine whether or not there were any violations of the Uniform Athlete Agent Act.  Weeks later there were reports that North Carolina defensive tackle Marvin Austin had been subpoenaed to testify in the investigation.

According to an ESPN.com report, Austin is appearing Friday morning before the Secretary of State's office to give testimony about allegations into whether agents and financial advisors violated the Uniform Athletes Agents Act.  

Austin began testifying at 9:30 a.m. ET Friday, the source said. A representative from the North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State's office was not immediately available for comment.

The office of the North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State subpoenaed Austin earlier this month as part of its investigation into the alleged involvement of some sports agents and financial advisors with UNC student athletes.  

When reached by telephone, Austin's attorney, Christopher Lyons, would not confirm whether Austin is testifying, but added, "Marvin Austin is fully cooperating in their investigation and we'll have no further comment until the investigation is concluded.  

A source told ESPN that Blake has already been subpoenaed by the Secretary of State's office and may testify as early as next week. Blake has not returned messages left on his cell phone.

The biggest development in these testimonies would be any additional information that could be revealed that could affect the current state of the North Carolina football team.  There could be details that were either misunderstood, or omitted entirely from NCAA investigations that would be made clearer when testifying under oath.  

North Carolina has only been able to clear one more player, starting running back Shaun Draughn, since their season-opening 30-24 loss to LSU in the Chick Fil-A Kickoff Game in Atlanta.  However, all of the remaining suspended players have been going through full practice and team activities except for Austin.  This could suggest that North Carolina plans on seeing most of their suspended players back on the field at some point, but have little faith that Austin will get a chance to suit up for the Tar Heels this season.
Posted on: September 15, 2010 2:57 pm
Edited on: September 15, 2010 3:30 pm
 

Gamecocks dismiss Weslye Saunders from team

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It looks like the NCAA's investigation about football players and their involvement with agents has claimed another victim.

Word broke on Wednesday afternoon that the South Carolina Gamecocks had dismissed the previously suspended tight end Weslye Saunders from the team. Saunders had been suspended indefinitely by Steve Spurrier for a "violation of team rules," though Spurrier also said at the time that it had nothing to do with Saunders' alleged residence at the Whitney Hotel in Miami or the NCAA's investigation.

“Weslye Saunders is no longer part of our football program,” said South Carolina AD Eric Hyman in a release. “Beyond that I will have no further comment.”

Whitney, along with other players like North Carolina 's Marvin Austin and Alabama 's Marcell Dareus , came under scrutiny for living in the Whitney Hotel with questions about how they were paying for their stay. The players were all asked to vacate the hotel in August and pay off any outstanding balances--something Whitney reportedly did with the help of a loan -- but Saunders and a number of teammates reportedly still reside there.

Whitney, a native of Durham, North Carolina has also admitted to being a long time friend of Marvin Austin.

Updates on this developing story as they come.

For more breaking news and analysis follow us on Twitter @CBSSportsNCAAF or Subscribe to our RSS Feed






 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com