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Tag:Michigan Stadium
Posted on: May 26, 2011 6:10 pm
 

Michigan AD: 120,000-seat stadium a possibility

Posted by Adam Jacobi

One would not normally look at Michigan Stadium, home of 109,901 Wolverine fans on fall Saturdays, and think "this needs to be considerably bigger." It's already the biggest stadium in North America, after all, and renovations were just completed there last year. Time to leave the Big House alone for a few decades, yes?

Well, maybe, but maybe not. Michigan athletic director Dave Brandon was on WTKA-AM in Ann Arbor this morning, and as the Detroit Free Press reports, he shared a vision that would accommodate perhaps 10,000 or more fans in the hallowed stadium:

"One of the things that I’ve said publicly I’d love to do at some point is close in at least one of the ends, and that’s all part of the master plan for growth. The south end of the stadium would be the place that we would start, and if we were to take the bleacher system up to the top of the scoreboards, which would be even with the elevation of the East and the West towers, create a concourse that would afford fans the ability to get from one side to the other, both indoors and outdoors, both in the concourse and additional bleacher capacity.

"It would take the total capacity up close to 119,000, maybe even 120,000. I would love to do that at some point under my watch."

 Now, this wouldn't be building for the sake of building; Brandon reiterated multiple times during the interview that the expansion would need to be precipitated by fan demand; the extra seats would have to be sold immediately in order to actually pay for any new construction, so they're not driving the heavy construction equipment to the Big House just yet. Still, Brandon specifically mentioned doing the expansion under his watch, and he's already almost 60 years old, so this probably isn't a 2050 project either.

Of course, it should also be mentioned that Michigan is coming off its worst three-year stretch in program history, and unless Brady Hoke turns the program around quickly, we may never see the extra demand for season tickets that the project requires. So there is that tiny little detail too. Nonetheless, should the Good Ship Wolverine be righted soon, we may soon see the Big House get even Bigger once again.

Posted on: May 20, 2011 11:45 am
 

'Model' for Michigan throwbacks unveiled

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

They're not officially official just yet. But according to the Detroit Free-Press, the throwback uniforms Michigan will wear for this year's primetime extravaganza against Notre Dame -- the first night game in Michigan Stadium history -- "will be modeled" on the sample image here:



Between this look and the Irish's planned 1960s throwbacks, on national television, with the Big House history being made, the game is shaping up to be quite the event for a matchup of teams that won a combined 15 games a year ago.

The only problem: assuming Michigan's jerseys do look more-or-less like the mockup above, this MVictors Wolverine uniform history tour shows that they won't actually be throwing back to any specific former look; they'll be wearing what the uniform designers at Adidas seem to think a Michigan throwback ought to look like.

Not a big deal if the uniforms come out looking snazzy anyway, but this is college football. A little more effort at authenticity would be nice.
Posted on: April 1, 2011 3:42 pm
Edited on: April 1, 2011 3:45 pm
 

Kelly: UM and ND to don throwbacks for matchup

Posted by Chip Patterson

The Michigan - Notre Dame matchup has gotten some extra hype this year, with the recent announcement that their Sept. 10 meeting in Michigan Stadium will be moved to primetime. It will be the first night game in the history of the storied rivalry, and the first true night game in the history of the Big House. Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly recently divulged some even more juicy details about the matchup, telling the media that both schools will be wearing throwback jerseys for the game. He stayed pretty mum on the look of the Irish (the report says Kelly hinted to the Joe Kuharich era -- 1959-62), but gave a pretty good description of how the Wolverines will look for the showdown.

"I'm just trying to help you guys piece together what it's going to look like, without me saying and then getting yelled at by our adidas people that we blew the surprise for them," Kelly told Brian Hamilton of the Chicago Tribune. "But yeah, we're going to have throwback uniforms. As they will. I can tell you what theirs look like: They have a block 'M' on them, and a number, and a number on their helmet. How's that? The adidas people at Michigan are going to be (ticked) at me."

The primetime matchup will be a endorsement dream for adidas, who has largely missed out on the publicity of alternate uniforms in the last couple of seasons. Tennessee made some noise with their Halloween uniforms, but few other examples come to mind from recent history. But there will only be a handful of regular season games in 2011 that will get the treatment of Michigan-Notre Dame. For the last couple seasons Nike has trotted out trendy alternate uniforms for their biggest programs on the biggest stage. Now adidas will get to join the fun for this clash of past, present, and future.

Posted on: March 3, 2011 3:09 pm
Edited on: March 3, 2011 8:34 pm
 

Hinnen's Favorite Stadiums

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

In college football, more than any other sport, the stadiums can be just as memorable as the games played within them. So as CBS Sports takes a look at the best stadiums that college football has to offer, the bloggers here at Eye On College Football share their three favorite stadiums in the country.




1. Rose Bowl (Pasadena, Calif., capacity 92, 452). It's simple: if College Football Nation ever decided to name one stadium its Capitol building, there would really be only one choice. No venue boasts more college football history, reflects more college football history (remember that the Rose Bowl is the most famous of many imitators of the original Yale Bowl, arguably the most architecturally-influential stadium in all of football), or is more immediately synonymous with the college game. There's a reason that Super Bowls and World Cup finals stop by from time to time to borrow what the Rose Bowl gives college football on the regular.

If you'd agree with the statement that college football's biggest games are the ones played in its biggest bowls -- and why wouldn't you? -- the importance of the Rose Bowl becomes even more obvious. Because as great a game as the Sugar Bowl is, how much, really, does the Superdome add to it? The University of Phoenix Stadium to the Fiesta? The Orange Bowl isn't even played in the Orange Bowl any more. The Rose Bowl, on the other hand, is the Rose Bowl in very large part because it's played at the Rose Bowl. It's a stadium that deserves to host national championships, rather than one that simply does. And what higher compliment can you pay a college football venue than that?




2. Sanford Stadium (University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., capacity 92,746). It's impossible to make a list of college football's greatest stadiums without relying heavily on candidates from the SEC; it doesn't get any louder than in Florida Field or Jordan-Hare, there's no atmosphere more intense than at Bryant-Denny or Tiger Stadium, there's no venue more exhilarating than Neyland or the underrated Williams-Brice. 

But for this blogger's money, there's no more unique SEC stadium experience than that at Sanford. Whereas most of the classic SEC stadiums tower like concrete monoliths over their surrounding campuses, Sanford -- nestled into a former creek bed between gentle slopes on either side -- feels more integrated with what's already one of the most picturesque campuses in the South. Add in the mystique of the Hedges and the perennially rabid Dawg fans, and walking down to Sanford with 92,000 other fans for an evening kickoff is one of the special atmospheres in college football. It's splitting hairs picking one SEC stadium -- ask em again tomorrow and you'll get a different answer -- but this hair is split in Athen's favor.




3. Michigan Stadium (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., capacity 109,901). "The Big House" is, hands-down, the greatest optical illusion in football; viewed from the outside (particularly for those raised on the above-mentioned SEC sky-scrapers, and particularly before the recent renovations), the deep-set stadium appears nondescript, unintimidating even. But then you enter, and the rows and rows and rows just keep going and going and going. You look from one corner to its opposite and realize that even as the proverbial crow flies, it's a long, long way. You know you are in the largest football stadium ever built in America. And you are impressed.

Of course, that size has had its drawbacks; with that much wide-open space and a crowd whose less-than-rowdy reputation isn't entirely undeserved, the Big House hasn't always been the loudest venue for opposing teams. But the new luxury suite/press box structure has helped that problem, and a lively student section (silly third-down key waving excepted) does its part as well. The bottom line is that if you come away disappointed in a stadium that's as quintessentially college football as it is big -- and the Big House is both -- that's your problem.
Posted on: October 21, 2010 12:31 pm
Edited on: October 21, 2010 12:37 pm
 

Who needs a ticket when you have a gun?

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As we went over here a few weeks ago, tickets to the game between Michigan and Michigan State at the Big House were tough to get this year, and the ones you could get were incredibly expensive.  There were plenty of people who would have liked to go to the game but never got the chance, but those poor souls didn't have the ingenuity of one fan.

He was smart enough to get his M16 rifles.

A 42-year old man from southeast Michigan not only got himself into the stadium for the game, but on to the field.  See, he's a full-time member of the National Guard, so he put on his uniform, grabbed his rifle and headed to Michigan Stadium in military vehicle.  Once he was there he explained to security that he was a member of the honor guard, and after having his weapons examined to make sure they weren't loaded, was granted access to the stadium.

He was there until an actual member of the honor guard explained to security that the man wasn't actually a member, and he was escorted from the stadium.  He was then arrested and released without being charged for anything.

A brilliant plan, if I do say so myself.  One that could only have been topped had the man entered the stadium by jumping out of an airplane.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com