Tag:Mike Anderson
Posted on: July 13, 2011 8:32 pm
 

NCAA investigation of Auburn isn't over

Posted by Tom Fornelli

If you thought that the NCAA's investigation of Auburn and its recruitment of Cam Newton was over, then it seems you'd be wrong. At least, that's the impression NCAA Vice President of Enforcement Julie Roe Lach gave Auburn head coach Gene Chizik last month. That's when football and basketball coaches from the SEC were in Destin, Florida where Lach made a presentation to the group.

According to a report in the New York Times, after Lach opened up her presentation for discussion, Chizik had quite a few questions for her and then she dropped a bombshell on him.
[Chizik] peppered Roe Lach with a flurry of questions about the N.C.A.A.’s investigation into Cam Newton and why the N.C.A.A. had not publicly announced that the investigation was over. Chizik complained that the inquiry’s open-ended nature had hurt Auburn’s recruiting and he followed up at least three times, leading to a testy exchange.

“You’ll know when we’re finished,” Roe Lach told Chizik, according to several coaches who were at the meeting. “And we’re not finished.”
Well then!

While neither the NCAA or Auburn would confirm the exchange between Chizik and Roe Lach, according to the New York Times report, four fellow SEC basketball coaches -- Vanderbilt's Kevin Stallings, Arkansas' Mike Anderson, LSU's Trent Johnson and Ole Miss' Andy Kennedy -- did confirm the exchange to the paper.

Of course, just because the investigation isn't over, that doesn't mean the NCAA is going to find any new evidence than what it has already and use it to punish Auburn. Still, the fact that the NCAA is still digging around can't be all that comforting for Auburn faithful.


Posted on: May 26, 2011 12:56 pm
 

Bubba Starling will be at Nebraska in July

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Quarterback Bubba Starling was one of the bigger signings in Nebraska's 2011 recruiting class, and the 6'5 two-sport star out of Gardner, Kansas told the Lincoln Journal Star on Wednesday that he'd be on campus to begin taking classes on July 10th. Of course, the real question with Starling is whether he'll still be in Lincoln after August 15th.

As I said, Starling is a two-sport star, and while he may have been a high-profile signing for Nebraska as a quarterback, his star shines a bit brighter in the other sport he plays - baseball. Starling is widely considered to be the best high school baseball player in the country, and I've seen him compared to the Texas Rangers' Josh Hamilton in overall terms of his ability. Which is why just about every MLB draft expert has Starling going in the top ten of the MLB amatuer draft on June 6th.

Starling has said in the past that it will take a lot to get him to leave Nebraska, and a lot is what he's likely going to get from whichever MLB team drafts him. It's possible that Starling could be offered a signing bonus of $5 million, a possibility that is a lot more likely when you realize his agent is Scott Boras. I don't care how much you like a school, or enjoy playing football, when you're fresh out of high school and somebody offers you $5 million to do something you love like playing baseball, it's not easy to turn that down. Especially when you consider that Nebraska baseball coach Mike Anderson, whom Starling had a good relationship with and was a big reason he chose the school, was fired on Sunday.

Starling told the Lincoln Journal Star that Anderson's firing won't have any influence in his decision, but it's a lot easier to say that than it is to mean it. I can't put myself in Starling's head, but I know that if I were in his shoes and I was offered $5 million to play baseball, I'd take the money and give it my best shot.

After all, if baseball didn't work out for him, Starling wouldn't be the first player in history to give up on it and come back to play college football. You don't have to look any further than current Oklahoma State quarterback Brandon Weeden to find such an example. 

 
 
 
 
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