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Tag:NCAA Committee On Infractions
Posted on: November 30, 2011 4:52 pm
Edited on: November 30, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Sorry, Akron: Jim Tressel's not interested

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

You can't really blame Akron fans for getting their hopes up, can you? 

Jim Tressel was once a graduate assistant for the Zips, and he is more-or-less available, and he may have even been at an Akron basketball game recently. (Possibly. Maybe. Though probably not.) Given the hopeless mess the Akron program finds itself in after the recently dimissed Rob Ianello's two-year, 2-22 tenure, if we were Zips fans, we'd start a Facebook page asking the Vest to come coach our team, too.

But alas, it's not to be. Zips athletic director Tom Wistrcill said in a statement released Tuesday evening that while he had at least spoken to the former wildly successful Ohio State head coach, Tressel had told him thanks-but-no-thanks.

“While Coach Tressel has shared with us that he is not interested in coaching at Akron," Wistrcill said, "he has graciously volunteered to help his alma mater however he can during the search for our next football coach."

As reported by the Akron Beacon-JournalWistrcill had originally stated he would not be making any public statements following Ianello's firing, but that the widespread nature of the Tressel-to-Akron rumors within the Zips community had demanded a response.

Even if Tressel had been interested, however, the odds the Zips could have actually hired him were awfully long to begin with. Though not yet official, it remains highly likely that the NCAA's Committee on Infractions will punish Tressel for his role in the recent Buckeye scandals and cover-ups with a show-cause order, one that would make him all but unemployable at the NCAA level. Tressel will not be hired by anyone, Akron or otherwise, this 2011 offseason.

So where will the Zips turn instead? Paul Winters, former Zip and Akron assistant and current head coach at Division II Wayne State, is currently considered the most likely choice. Another name floated has been Toledo offensive coordinator Matt Campbell.

Photoshop of Tressel in Akron regalia via "We Want Jim Tressel for Akron Zips Football" Facebook page. Your optimism is sincerely saluted and admired, gentlemen.

For a full, updating team-by-team overview of 2011's coaching changes, check out (and bookmark) the Eye on CFB Coaching Carousel One-Stop Shop. And voice your opinion for the Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year by voting HERE. 
Posted on: August 24, 2011 3:27 pm
Edited on: August 24, 2011 3:33 pm
 

COI: "Evidence insufficient" for Vol violations

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The NCAA Committee on Infractions has released its findings from the organization's investigation into Tennessee athletics and former Volunteer head coach Lane Kiffin. And as reported yesterday, neither Kiffin nor the Tennessee football program will face any additional sanctions as a result of the investigation.

But that doesn't mean either Kiffin or the Vols didn't draw the notice of the COI. The report had this to say:

While the investigation included allegations of major violations in the football program, the committee concluded that the evidence was insufficient to support findings of major violations.

However, the committee stated it was "troubled by the number and nature of the secondary infractions by the football coaching staff during its one-year tenure at the institution."

The football staff committed 12 secondary violations over 10 months, all of which were related to recruiting.

The full public report from the COI added this condemnation as well:

Some of the violations received nationwide publicity and brought the football program into public controversy. This is not a record of which to be proud.

Clearly, the COI is not a happy body when it comes to Kiffin's tenure in Knoxville. But without the major violation to hang its punishin' hat on, apparently sanctions weren't an option. For a breakdown of some of the violations contained in the report, check our Tennessee RapidReports. (We were under the impression that suspensions were now on the table for serial secondary violators, but perhaps not.)

So happy body or not, it's nothing but good news for Kiffin, who had this to say: "I’m pleased that the NCAA based its decision on the facts and not on perception."

As for the perception the NCAA has lost its teeth since the USC penalties, however, expect that one to be as pervasive as ever.

For reaction on the show-cause order against Bruce Pearl and the rest of the Vol hoops fallout, stay tuned our sister blog Eye on College Basketball.

Posted on: August 18, 2011 2:54 pm
 

Mark Emmert says he's 'fine with' death penalty

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

NCAA
vice president of enforcement Julie Roe Lach said Wednesday the "majority of ... support" she encounters within the organization is for sanctions like bowl bans and scholarship reductions that stop short of the death penalty--even in the event of mammoth scandals like the one unfolding at Miami. But apparently, she didn't talk to the NCAA's own president.

Mark Emmert, having already taken the unusual step of commenting on an ongoing NCAA investigation with his initial statement on the Hurricane allegations, told the USA Today Thursday that the death penalty ought to be one "tool" at the Committee on Infractions' disposal:
"We need to make sure that we've got, for the committee on infractions, all the tools they need to create those kinds of deterrents. If that includes the death penalty, I'm fine with that."
Emmert said those deterrents should "provide serious second thoughts for anybody who thinks they can engage in this kind of behavior with impunity." He also commented on the Miami case directly again, saying that "if these allegations are true," they are "very troubling, and ... point out the real need for us to make changes and to make them thoughtfully and aggressively."

All of that certainly sounds noble enough. But Emmert's tough talk of change and nuclear-option sanctions won't mean much in the public eye if his organization doesn't back it up with legitimate reform, and penalties with teeth in cases of wanton rule-breaking (like, say, Jim Tressel's cover-up at Ohio State).

Discussing the death penalty is one thing, and it's fine as far as it goes. (Though the seemingly contradictory statements from Emmert and Roe Lach don't exactly portray the NCAA as an entity whose left hand knows what its right is doing.) But all the talk in the world won't do as much for Emmert's crusdade as one sensibly firm decision in a case like Miami's--and that decision doesn't have to be death penalty-caliber to prove the NCAA is serious.

Posted on: July 22, 2011 5:11 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 5:27 pm
 

Tennessee self-imposes two years' probation

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Given the craziness breaking out in Columbus, Tennessee picked an awfully nice time to make a little announcement of their own: the Volunteers are self-imposing two years' worth of probation following violations committed under Lane Kiffin and former men's basketball coach Bruce Pearl.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions could still set stiffer penalties at their meeting with the Vols, a meeting that at this time remains unscheduled but which should occur in the next eight weeks. But the university feels "the penalties imposed during the course of its investigation, coupled with its corrective measures, adequately address the violations that occurred."

Besides the probation, the school also imposed some minor recruiting restrictions on Derek Dooley's (as well as new hoops coach Cuonzo Martin's) staff. Their 168 "recruiting days" for the spring 2011 evaluation period were cut to 162, and only five members of Dooley's 10-member staff are allowed to make telephone calls to recruits on Nov. 1 of this year, the first day of the "recruiting "contact period."

The penalties come in addition to a number of other penalties issued by Tennessee compliance earlier this year. As the story from the Knoxville News-Sentinel reports:
As noted in the response [to the NCAA], all individuals associated with the violations, with the exception of football Director of Player Personnel Steve Rubio, are no longer employed by the university. That includes former athletic director Mike Hamilton, who resigned days before the June hearing, and former men's basketball coach Bruce Pearl and his three assistants, who all collectively misled NCAA investigators during June 2010 interviews.
The NCAA may slap on another year of probation or offer a few more (more substantial) recruiting restrictions. But unless another violation is uncovered during the two-year probation period, the worst for Tennessee athletics is now probably over.

Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:33 am
Edited on: July 19, 2011 11:50 am
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Yesterday LSU head coach Les Miles talked about how important it is to cooperate with the NCAA in any investigation, saying that it was "fundamental" and "necessary." Miles said that when asked about LSU's recent discussion with the NCAA regarding its relationship with Will Lyles. While that's a situation that likely won't be resolved for some time, LSU may find out shortly how cooperating with the NCAA can be beneficial to a program when it comes to possible penalties.

In 2010 LSU self-reported recruiting violations that took place in 2009 to the NCAA and had a hearing in front of the Committee on Infractions this past April. Now, according to a tweet from Yahoo's Charles Robinson, the NCAA has a conference call this afternoon to discuss the committee's decision in regards to LSU's case.



The violations LSU reported stem from the recruitment of former defensive tackle signee Akiem Hicks and former assistant coach D.J. McCarthy.  LSU found that McCarthy's recruitment of Hicks included improper phone contact, transportation and housing. Hicks never attended LSU and McCarthy was relieved of his duties after the violations were found. LSU also self-imposed recruiting sanctions on the program by docking two scholarships in its 2011 recruiting class along with its 2012 class.

Whether the NCAA will impose any further sanctions against LSU, well, we'll find out soon enough it seems. Though since LSU self-reported the issue, imposed its own sanctions and cooperated with the NCAA, I wouldn't expect any possible further punishment to be too severe.
Posted on: July 8, 2011 12:55 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 4:31 pm
 

Ohio State to vacate wins from 2010

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Ohio State submitted its reply to NCAA charges Friday, and according to the Associated Press, the school is going to wipe its 2010 season from the record books. Though the school did not mention any plans to lose scholarships or impose a bowl ban.

Ohio State says it's vacating its wins from the 2010 football season, including the Buckeyes' victory over Arkansas in the 2011 Sugar Bowl.

Responding to NCAA allegations over a memorabilia-for-cash scandal that cost former coach Jim Tressel his job, Ohio State says Friday it also is waiving a $250,000 fine it had imposed on Tressel and changing his resignation to a retirement. Through the school, the ex-Buckeyes coach says that he is taking responsibility for the NCAA inquiry, which developed after it was learned Tressel failed to report players receiving improper benefits.

The university also is imposing a two-year probation period on the program, which means there would be harsher penalties if any further wrongdoing is discovered..

Of course, while vacating its entire 2010 season is a good first step for Ohio State, this does not mean the school will escape the loss of scholarships or a postseason ban. After the school's date in front of the NCAA's Committee on Infractions next month, the NCAA could decide to institute both punishments, if not more.

And speaking of that meeting next month, word also came today that Jim Tressel will be appearing in front of the Committee on Infractions as well. My guess is that any further punishment that may come Ohio State's way could have a lot to do with whether Tressel is willing to fall on his sword as the school seems to hope he will by saying he was the only school official who was aware of any violations.

You can read more about my thoughts, along with Jerry Hinnen's, about Ohio State's decision here

Posted on: June 11, 2011 2:55 pm
Edited on: June 11, 2011 5:55 pm
 

Kiffin 'glad' COI hearing is over

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The NCAA's Committee on Infractions has been busy lately, meeting with Boise State for 13 hours on Friday. On Saturday it was Tennessee's turn, which meant Lane Kiffin was back in his old stomping grounds. Kiffin spoke with reporters after the hearing, and while he wouldn't go into specifics over what was discussed during the meeting, he did express relief that it was over.

“It was a very fair process,” Kiffin told the Knoxville News Sentinel. “I’m glad that it’s over, and I can get back to LA, and get back to our camps that are going on right now. Under the direction of the NCAA, we can’t comment about (specifics) at all.

“It was a lot shorter than the last one. I sat through three days of USC’s (hearing). I’m just happy that it’s over. I’m happy we got to get the truth presented, and so we’re going from here.”

Of course, just because the hearing is over, that doesn't mean Tennessee's problems are. After Kiffin's turn with the COI, attention was turned to Tennessee's men's basketball program and the disgressions under Bruce Pearl. As for the football team, though it's not exactly Kiffin's concern any longer as to what will happen at Tennessee, there's no time table as to when the NCAA will come to a decision on the school's hearing.
Posted on: June 10, 2011 12:22 pm
 

Tressel still has to pay his fine

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Resigning as head coach at Ohio State doesn't mean Jim Tressel will escape the fine the school gave him.

On Thursday Ohio State president Gordon Gee let the world know that Jim Tressel and Terrelle Pryor weren't the only people who had left the school in recent weeks, saying that the NCAA investigators who were around left Columbus a week ago. Of course, just because the investigators have left, that doesn't mean the investigation is over. As for Jim Tressel, just because he's no longer the head coach of Ohio State, that doesn't men he's allowed to stop paying for his mistakes.

While Tressel is no longer required to meet with the NCAA Committee on Infractions on August 12th, if he hopes to coach again on the college level, it's a move he should make. Still, that's a choice he's allowed to make. A choice he doesn't have, according to Gee, is whether or not he'll pay the $250,000 fine the school originally gave him -- along with the five-game suspension -- in an effort to ease any future punishment from the NCAA. Gee said on Thursday that Tressel will pay the fine, and the school said the details of the payment are still being worked out.

Which is a pretty big dent in Tressel's wallet, especially now that he won't have the regular income as Ohio State's head coach. So even though he won't have to deal with any penalties likely coming Ohio State's way in the future, Tressel will still feel hit in his bank account. 
 
 
 
 
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