Tag:NCAA Rules
Posted on: March 6, 2012 11:21 am
 

Embree: new kickoff rules could be dangerous

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The NCAA adopted rule changes on kickoffs for the 2012 season with the hope of reducing injuries, but not everybody thinks that will be the case. Colorado head coach Jon Embree can see a situation where the new rules may lead to even more injuries on kickoffs than before.

The new rule has kickoffs coming from the 35-yard line rather than the 30, in hopes that more kicks will go through the end zone and lead to a touchback. Coverage teams will only be allowed a 5-yard head start in 2012 as well. Rules that, theoretically, should reduce injuries.

However, it's the fact that touchbacks on kickoffs have been moved from the 20-yard line to the 25 that Embree believes may lead to trouble. He told the Daily Camera that it will lead to coaches kicking short on purpose

"I think you high pooch it and cover it," Embree said. "What I think will happen is if you get effective at that, you're putting the other team even more at risk than what the rule intended because unless he fair catches it, he can really take a shot because everyone is closer obviously.

"It will be interesting to see how that plays out. If you get a guy who can kick it to the 7-yard line every time, you can mishandle it and then you will have collisions. It will be interesting to see if they tweak this rule over time. The returner has to have good judgment and a good feel. You're never used to fair catching kickoffs, even though that is something you can do. There are a lot of timing issues that go into a kickoff return that now you're going to have to figure out as a return guy."

It will be interesting to see if Embree's theory is right this fall, and whether or not coaches will adapt to the rule as he suggests they will, or if they prefer booting the ball through the end zone and taking the risk of a touchdown return out of play. 

Whatever the new kickoff rules lead to, we won't know for sure until, well, kickoff.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 2:35 pm
 

VIDEO: Brett McMurphy talks playoff system

Posted by Chip Patterson

CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy and Dennis Dodd have been reporting from the BCS meetings this week in Dallas, as many of the decision-makers in college football debate the best postseason format for the sport.

The 11 conference commissioners, Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, two BCS officials and a BCS attorney have begun discussing the possibility of a plus-one format to determine the BCS National Champion. The current BCS contract ends after the 2013-14 season, allowing for a new format beginning with the 2014 regular season.

On Friday, Brett McMurphy joined Tim Brando to discuss the momentum behind the BCS plus-one format.



For more from Brett on the BCS meetings, check out his blog, McMurphy's Law.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 12:33 pm
Edited on: February 24, 2012 12:39 pm
 

NCAA approves new kickoff rules, other changes

Posted by Chip Patterson

The NCAA announced on Friday the approval of rules changes in college football, including moving the kick off from the 30-yard line to the 35.

While the ball will be kicked from the 35, players on the kicking team can't line up for the play behind the 30-yard line. According to the NCAA, this is intended to limit the running start kicking teams used to have during the play.

Also, touchbacks on free kicks (kickoffs and punts after a safety) will be moved to the 25-yard line instead of the 20. Touchbacks on all other plays will remain at the 20-yard line. According to the Football Rules Committee, this change is meant to encourage more touchbacks from the receiving team.

These changes are a result from examining NCAA data that showed injuries occur more often on kickoffs than in any other phase of the game. By encouraging touchbacks they will limit the amount of times the play is used, especially as higher scoring (see: Big 12) has resulted in more kickoffs.

Another rule change announced Friday could end up affecting games, possibly even more so than the kickoff rules. According to the NCAA, if a player loses his helmet on the play - facemasks and fouls don't count - he must sit out the next play.

Here is the wording from the NCAA release:

Another new rule that goes into effect next season is if a player loses his helmet (other than as the result of a foul by the opponent, such as a facemask), it will be treated like an injury. The player must leave the game and is not allowed to participate for the next play.

Current injury timeout rules guard against using this rule to gain an advantage from stopping the clock. Additionally, if a player loses his helmet, he must not continue to participate in the play, in order to protect him from injury.

If a quarterback or running back loses his helmet late in the fourth quarter of a close game, you can bet coaches will be screaming for flags. Sometimes helmets just pop off, and there could be cases where there is no threat of injury. Regardless, that player must sit out the next play.

Two more adjustments announced on Friday:

The rules panel also approved new wording in the football rules book regarding blocking below the waist. Offensive players in the tackle box at the snap who are not in motion are allowed to block below the waist legally without restriction. All other players are restricted from blocking below the waist with a few exceptions (for example, straight-ahead blocks).

There will also be a new rule prohibiting players from leaping over blockers in an attempt to block a punt. Receiving-team players trying to jump over a shield-blocking scheme has become popular for teams in punt formation. Receiving-team players try to defeat this scheme by rushing into the backfield to block a punt. In some cases, these players are contacted and end up flipping in the air and landing on their head or shoulders.
 
At the core, all of these changes are meant with the intent of improving player safety. As more medical research reveals dangerous aspects of the sport, changes such as these will be necessary to keep football thriving.

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Posted on: June 21, 2011 12:13 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 1:08 pm
 

UConn's Pasqualoni speaks on player stipends

Posted by Chip Patterson

After spending six seasons on the NFL sideline, Connecticut's Paul Pasqualoni has been getting back into the groove of being a head coach in college football. A big part of that in the offseason is the public relations grind. Pasqualoni made the short trip to Bristol this week spend time at ESPN participating in various programming for the network. In his appearance on First Take, Pasqualoni weighed in on the challenges of creating more money for scholarship athletes.

"I think we would all like to see the players be able to receive a stipend," Pasqualoni told First Take's Dana Jacobson. "Now having said that, it's a very difficult thing to do. If you do it for a I-A football player then to be fair you have to do it for all scholarship players. Of all the I-A teams in the country, and there's probably over 120 of them, maybe 40 of them are operating at a level of profit. I don't know exactly how you fund it, when you start talking about every student athlete and giving them a stipend."

Pasqualoni spent 17 years with the Syracuse football program, with 13 of them as a head coach. At 61, he is one of the more seasoned coaches in the game and it is refreshing to hear an even-keeled look at the situation. When Mike Slive or Jim Delany give their opinion on the issue, it always feels loaded (because it is). Many people would like to see scholarship athletes receive a stipend for their hours put into college athletics, which often leaves barely enough time for academics and no chance of a part-time job. But the logistics of creating, managing, and regulating that money is still something that needs to be agreed on before any additional stipends are put in place. Change, in general, can take a long time with issues involving money. But with the NCAA, there is no telling how long it will take for those discussions to take place in a serious manner.
Posted on: April 4, 2011 10:58 am
Edited on: April 4, 2011 11:07 am
 

Maryland loses three scholarships for the fall

Posted by Chip Patterson

As Maryland's new head football coach, Randy Edsall is trying to put in place new standards and practices that will mark his era as the face of the Terps' program.  Unfortunately, he will still have to deal with some of the consequences from the old regime.  Maryland's football program will lose three scholarships for the 2011-2012 season for failure to meet the NCAA standards on Academic Progress Rate (APR).  Maryland's football APR score from 2009-2010 will be 922, three points below the 925 mark for avoiding penalties.

"We already have a system in place to deal with and rectify the situation," Edsall said in an official release.  The APR was created by the NCAA to measure real-time academic progress over a four year span.  The numbers are calculated annually, and Maryland's score will reflect the performance from 2006-2007 to 2009-2010.

"The APR gives us a four-year look at past performance, which unfortunately was not as good as we would have liked," said athletic director Kevin Anderson. "We do feel, though, that with changes in our staffs and processes, we will get a fresh perspective on how best to ensure we reach and surpass our goals academically in the future."

Edsall has already made headlines for his conduct and appearance changes to the football program. Gone are baseball caps, do-rags, and earrings from the Gossett Football Team House. Players may have facial hair, but only if it is neatly trimmed. It is all part of a stricter approach that includes a strong focus on academics.

 
 
 
 
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