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Tag:NCAA violations
Posted on: February 20, 2012 1:25 pm
 

Gee says NCAA had no precedent for bowl ban

Posted by Tom Fornelli

In an interview with the Ohio State student newspaper, The Lantern, school president Gordon Gee took exception to the bowl ban Ohio State received from the NCAA following "Tattoogate." Gee said that the NCAA was essentially out to get Ohio State because it's Ohio State, and that there had been no precedent for such a decision.

"First of all, the NCAA — if we would have given up five bowl games, they would have imposed the sixth on us because they were going to impose a bowl ban," Gee told the paper. "This was Ohio State. This was (the NCAA's) moment in time, and they were going to impose a bowl ban no matter what we did.

"I'm a lawyer. I take a look at precedent. There's no precedent for a bowl ban for us." 

I feel like this is where I should point out that never in the history of college football has a university president been fired by a football coach, yet Gee was still worried that it would happen to him, right?

Now, Gee may be right that there is no precedent for the NCAA's decision in this case, but that doesn't mean what the NCAA did is wrong either. Maybe the NCAA did want to send a message to the rest of college football saying "if we'll do this to Ohio State, we'll do this to you too."

Or maybe the NCAA just saw a case in which Ohio State played a bowl game using players that should not have been eligible after Jim Tressel failed to report anything about what he knew for so long, and decided it's only fair to take a bowl game away from Ohio State in return.

The fact is whether you agree with the decision or not -- and I'm guessing Ohio State fans reading this don't, and everyone else does -- there's nothing that can be done about it now. You just accept the punishment and move on.

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Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:31 pm
 

PODCAST: Bowl Previews (Dec. 30) w/Dennis Dodd

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We've been posting podcasts with bowl previews all week, and that won't be changing today. Our own Dennis Dodd joins Adam Aizer on the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast to discuss the matchups in the Armed Forces, Pinstripe, Music City and Insight Bowls. Also, if those games aren't enough to whet your appetite, they talk about other things as well.

In particular, the latest at Ohio State following the NCAA's decision on Tuesday. Did the NCAA do enough? Is a bowl ban worse than reduced scholarships? Answers to these questions and more, so be sure to listen.

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.


You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.

Posted on: December 9, 2011 2:21 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 2:46 pm
 

Larry Fedora introduced at North Carolina

Posted by Chip Patterson


While the news has been official for a few days now, North Carolina was proud to tie up their loose ends and announce former Southern Miss head coach Larry Fedora as their next football coach.

On Friday morning the Board of Trustees approved a seven-year deal with Fedora earning more than $1.7 million annually, with more bonuses for division or conference championships as well as high graduation rates. With the specifics settled, Fedora was officially introduced to the media in a press conference on Friday afternoon.

"Today is the first day in a new era of UNC football," Fedora said as he took the podium for the first time. "It's going to be exciting. You better buckle your seat belts and hold on, because it's going to be a wild ride"

The last two seasons have already been a wild ride for North Carolina football, under the cloud of an NCAA investigation into the football program that began in the Summer of 2010.

Fedora steps into the position with a two-year probation and scholarship reductions already self-imposed by the school, and possibly more sanctions coming from the NCAA in the coming weeks. The scandal, especially the dismissal of head coach Butch Davis just days before the opening of training camp for the 2011 season, has divided the North Carolina football fan base over the last few months. The idea of unifying the North Carolina fans was mentioned by Chancellor Holden Thorp, new athletic director Bubba Cunningham, and driven home by Fedora himself. He described the "UNC brand" as being recognized nationwide, and needed the support of "everyone who bleeds Carolina blue" to build a successful program.

Fedora was fiery and energetic throughout his first meeting with the North Carolina media. While he has no experience recruiting in the area, he pointed to his wife as an example of what kind of recruiter he is - even using the expression "I out-kicked my coverage" The off-field troubles and discontent within the fan base resulted in some disappointing attendance during the 2011 season, and Fedora offered a message for the fans.

"We need our students and fans to make game day an unbelievable experience in Chapel Hill," Fedora exclaimed. "We need you to pack Kenan Stadium, we need to be here early, and we need you to stay late. You need to understand, if you get up to get a drink - you just missed a Tar Heel touchdown."

Fedora's arrival brings arguably the most dramatic on-field change to North Carolina football in more than a decade. The former Oklahoma State offensive coordinator plans to make North Carolina's offense a no-huddle, single back spread. He said he plans to sit in on every offensive meeting, and joked that the plays that work will be the ones that he had called. Defensively, he plans to use multiple looks as well as disguised blitzes and coverages. Fedora promised the fans a unit that will be known for "flying to the ball" and "knocking the tar out of people."

He acknowledged the adversity the team has overcome already, and credited interim head coach Everett Withers for leading North Carolina to their fourth consecutive bowl appearance. No decisions have been made regarding Fedora's staff, but he indicated that both members of his staff at Southern Miss and currently in Chapel Hill will be considered.

Fedora also plans to coach the Golden Eagles in the Hawaii Bowl on Dec. 24, his final game with the Conference USA Champions.

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Posted on: October 19, 2011 1:19 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Boise's Tjong-a-Tjoe reinstated

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The NCAA announced on Wednesday that Boise State defensive tackle Ricky Tjong-A-Tjoe, who may just be the owner of the greatest name ever, has been reinstated to the Boise State football team. Tjong-A-Tjoe will be eligible to play for Boise this weekend against Air Force.

He had been forced to sit out the first six games of the season after receiving impermissible benefits that totaled $13,600 from a host family. Tjong-A-Tjoe, one of three Boise State players from Amsterdam who were ineligible to start the season, received benefits that included "housing, meals, gifts, school supplies, travel, vacation, among other items" according to the NCAA.

Tjong-A-Tjoe still has to repay the value of the benefits he received, which shouldn't be a problem at all for a kid from another country that doesn't have a job since he's playing college football.

He's the last of the three Boise State players from Amsterdam, Cedric Febis and Geraldo Boldewjin being the other two, to be reinstated.
Posted on: October 7, 2011 8:02 pm
Edited on: October 7, 2011 8:03 pm
 

More suspensions for the Buckeyes

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The NCAA announced on Friday that four Ohio State football players were to be suspended for accepting improper benefits from boosters. The players are DeVier Posey, Dan Herron, Marcus Hall and Daniel Fellow.

"Ohio State University football student-athlete Devier Posey must sit five games and repay benefits after receiving approximately $720 from a booster for work not performed, according to a decision today by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff," said the statement on the NCAA website. "Posey also accepted approximately $100 in golf fees from another individual, which is a preferential treatment violation.

"Three additional Ohio State football student-athletes – Marcus Hall, Melvin Fellows and Daniel Herron – will miss one game and must repay benefits after receiving pay for work not performed from the booster. Herron and Fellows both accepted approximately $290 in excess pay while Hall received $230 in overpayment. In its decision, the staff noted the overpayment occurred over an extended period of time."

As you'll likely recall, both Posey and Herron were already serving suspensions due to benefits they already received, including free tattoos, that caused Ohio State to vacate its entire 2010 season. These new suspensions will be added on to those old suspensions, so for DeVier Posey, that means he'll be forced to sit out 10 of Ohio State's 12 regular season games this year.

"This penalty is harsh considering the nature of the violation and the five game suspension already served by this student athlete," said Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith regarding Posey's latest suspension.

He's right, too, the penalty is harsh, but that's what happens when you're a repeat offender: the punishment gets worse. You'd think the poster child for compliance would know that.
Posted on: October 3, 2011 11:39 am
Edited on: October 3, 2011 11:40 am
 

Status of Herron, Posey in doubt for Ohio State

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Ohio State has now played five games this season, which means that the suspensions that players like Mike Adams, Solomon Thomas, Dan Herron and DeVier Posey for their involvement in Tattoogate is over. However, that doesn't mean that every single one of them will be able to play when the Buckeyes take on Nebraska on Saturday.

According to a report in the Columbus Dispatch, the status of both Posey and Herron is still in question.
A separate probe by the NCAA into Herron and Posey apparently showed they may have received improper benefits in terms of alleged inflated remuneration while working summer jobs in the Cleveland area. It could mean at least one more game of suspension for Herron, for whom the benefits was said to be in the $200 to $400 range, and perhaps multiple games for Posey, for whom the benefit was said to be about $500.

Sources said both refuted the charges. Herron, a source said, produced evidence that he thought showed he had received no improper benefit.
The NCAA started a separate probe into Herron and Posey earlier this season while looking into the benefits Jordan Hall, Travis Howard and Corey Brown received from booster Robert DiGeronimo for attending a charity event. Those three were all suspended for the first two games of the season for accepting $200 from DiGeronimo.

Ohio State is scheduled to make an announcement at 3:30pm Eastern on Monday.

If Herron and Posey can't play this weekend against Nebraska, it would be a big blow to the Buckeyes. The Ohio State offense has been pretty dreadful this season, so getting two playmakers like Herron and Posey back would be a nice boost.

Both Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas are expected to be cleared to play.
Posted on: September 27, 2011 2:16 am
 

Report: Former Vols assistant wired cash to Lyles

Posted by Adam Jacobi

USC fans wondering why former assistant Willie Mack Garza resigned so abruptly two days before the start of this season now have an answer -- and that answer has a paper trail. According to a report by Yahoo Sports, Willie Lyles informed NCAA investigators that Garza had wired him $1,500 in 2009 to get coveted tailback Lache Seastrunk onto the Tennessee campus for an unofficial visit; Garza had been an assistant of Lane Kiffin at UT at that point, before Kiffin brought Garza with him to USC's staff in 2010.

On unofficial visits, recruits and their families are responsible for all costs incurred, so if Garza supplied that money to Lyles for the purposes of getting Seastrunk to campus, that's a serious violation of NCAA rules. Whether Garza gave money to Lyles is not in question, though; Yahoo Sports has a copy of the Moneygram record of that transaction, and sure enough, there's $1,500 going from Garza to Lyles. Being that Lyles himself told the NCAA that the money was to pay for Seastrunk's plane tickets, which totaled $1,446.80 in a purchase two weeks prior to the Moneygram transaction, there doesn't appear to be much wiggle room for Garza.

CBSSports.com first reported that Garza's departure from USC was related to an NCAA probe of Tennessee's recruiting practices on the day that Garza resigned, on September 1. That report has now been proven accurate by this Yahoo story. 

For Garza's efforts above and beyond the NCAA guidelines, Tennessee didn't get much; not only did Seastrunk not commit to the Volunteers, of course, he didn't even take an official visit to Knoxville once it was time to make those choices. Seastrunk famously chose Oregon over Auburn in a recruiting process that still leaves a sour taste in Tigers fans' mouths to this day, and once the reports surfaced of Lyles maintaining close relationship with recruits even while getting paid large sums of money by the schools recruiting them, Seastrunk ended up transferring to Baylor.

For as bad as this report makes Garza look in the eyes of the NCAA, however, the real entity in danger here is Tennessee; that athletic department was hit with a failure to monitor charge in August among various major infractions perpetrated by then-head basketball coach Bruce Pearl, and the program is nowhere near completing its two years of probation handed down by the NCAA. If the NCAA finds this to be another egregious flouting of recruiting regulations, Tennessee is liable to be considered a "repeat offender" by the Committee on Infractions, and that easily could mean serious, long-lasting consequences for the entire athletic department.
Posted on: August 20, 2011 12:50 pm
Edited on: August 20, 2011 12:53 pm
 

Larry Coker not distracted by Miami scandal

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As the University of Texas-San Antonio prepares to play the first football game in school's history, a lot of the attention being paid to the team right now has to do with the school its head coach used to coach at. Larry Coker spent 12 years coaching at Miami, and won a national title with the Hurricanes as head coach in 2001.

The five years Coker spent as head coach at Miami coincided with the time that Nevin Shapiro claims he was lavishing the team with all sorts of gifts and perks, and while Coker feels bad for what's going on at Miami right now, he seems more concerned about life at UTSA.

“I'm almost more distraught, because I was there for 12 years,” Coker told the San Antonio Express-News. “(It's) not a distraction, because I haven't done anything. But the people there, the players ... it's very hurtful, it really is.” 

What Coker didn't do was say whether or not he knew of the things Shapiro was doing at Miami, saying in a report earlier in the week that he knew Shapiro by name only.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com