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Tag:North Carolina Football
Posted on: July 14, 2011 9:42 am
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Austin backs Tar Heel teammate on Twitter

Posted by Chip Patterson

On Wednesday, former North Carolina defensive end Michael McAdoo was in Durham County Courts petitioning for reinstatement after being ruled permanently ineligible and having his appeal denied by the NCAA. When Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson denied McAdoo's petition, the 6-foot-7, 245-pound lineman saw his chances of seeing the field as a Tar Heel once again fade away.

The result obviously disappointed McAdoo and his family, but the ruling enraged former teammate Marvin Austin, who took to Twitter to vent his frustration.

(Tweets in chronological order, presented as they appear)
I'm so heated right now..justice will prevail..even if I have to spill the beans

This is so frustrating right now..I can't rap my head around it..I wish I could understand but maybe its not logical enough to understand

Twitter I'm not bitter I just don't like the way my friend, teammate, brother was mislead, misused, and ostracized from the program for the

Same reasons that others got suspended and are able to play for because I know exactly the details in each case and its noway that this young

Man should have his dram snatched from him like the #ncaa has done. I can tell you so many stories that would be mind boggling in comparison

I swear it is simply disheartning that the people our parents put there trust in to protect us really only care there gain solely

Trust me I know…I love my school..I chose to come here when nobody thought it was smart to do..but I just wish the administration stood

And stop the cowardly acts when the are in front of the ncaa and just tell them what you told us…don't turn and twist your story to look

Appealing to the Ncaa and pressure the 21 year old athlete to say and do things that aren't in there best interest…its so much that's not

Said it stings when I think about it Unc true fans understand how we as players love this place it tatted in blood for most guys on the team.

Of all of the players involved in the North Carolina investigation, Austin might have the loudest voice of them all. Not only because he has the largest personality (remember he wants to be a sportscaster one day), but because he has been the highest-profile player involved with the largest dollar signs attached to his improper benefits.

It was also interesting that Austin took this rant to Twitter. After all, wasn't it his account that kick-started things in the first place? When North Carolina began to gather information internally, a decision was made at some point that trying to fight for Austin's eligibility was a lost cause.

Declared permanently ineligible, and now a second-round draft pick of the New York Giants, Austin has a story that certainly would interest the college football world. As the "most guilty" of North Carolina's suspended players, he could cause quite a stir if he does decide to "spill the beans."

Posted on: June 22, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:56 pm
 

PODCAST: Talking UNC Notice of Allegations

Posted by Chip Patterson

Earlier today, I hopped on the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast with Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst to talk a little UNC Notice of Allegations.

"Should Butch Davis be fired?" That's the question being asked by many people after scanning the collection of charges detailed in the 42-page report from the NCAA. In reality, there was very little in the notice that was not already known thanks to some aggressive reporting by both national and local media. But the report does bring together a year of investigations into potentially major violations in several different categories involving a fair share of the most notable names on the roster.

So yes, it does look bad. On the surface, it looks very bad.

But the picture that has been painted for the NCAA by North Carolina is one of an institution struggling to deal with "rogue" members. Since John Blake did not tell UNC about the money from Gary Wichard, and Jennifer Wiley continued to provide services after no longer being employed by the school; North Carolina (and more importantly Butch Davis) can say they are sorry and try to cooperate. In fact, it is their cooperation which the institution will argue demonstrates the feeling of responsibility among those in oversight of the program.

Many people would argue that Davis, who has known Blake for "at least 30 years," should have known his reputation around coaching circles. It will be argued for years to come, that no matter what the NCAA can or cannot prove: Davis knew what Blake and Wiley were doing.

But as of Tuesday, it does not appear that the NCAA is prepared to allege wrongdoing directly against Butch Davis. Enraged fans will scream that Davis is guilty, and demand what they consider "justice." But the NCAA, similar to our own justice system, does not act based on assumption or reputation. With no evidence, it cannot be proven that Davis knew of any wrongdoing during which he did not act on as a head coach.

As you'll hear in the podcast below, a decision was made when the NCAA set foot on campus. North Carolina either had to jump ship and get rid of Davis when the scandal broke, or ride out the storm with him at the helm. If Davis has made it this long, there will be no changes to his employment AT LEAST until this process is complete.

Okay, after all that serious talk I should probably warn you that we also discuss Mascots, Adam's plan for Wolvie the Wolverine, and my early crush on college cheerleaders.


Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:13 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:57 pm
 

UNC receives Notice of Allegations from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

In June 2010 the NCAA began to investigate the North Carolina football program in regards to possible violations regarding players receiving impermissible benefits. After a tumultuous season that saw 14 players miss at least one game (with seven missing the entire season), the first steps of closure can begin with this multi-pronged investigation into the North Carolina football program.

The official Notice of Allegations (you can see the full letter here on TarHeelBlue.com), includes nine different allegations.

Three (3) of the allegations are against former North Carolina assistant coach John Blake:

- Unethical conduct for providing false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution and for failure to cooperate with the investigation.
- Blake marketed athletic abilities of student-athletes to agent Gary Wichard
- Blake received outside income that he did not report to the institution

Two (2) of the allegations are against former North Carolina tutor Jennifer Wiley:

- Unethical conduct for refusing to provide information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution
- Wiley provided extra benefits to student-athletes in the form of ravel and parking expenses, and tutoring.

The rest of the allegations: - Allegations of fraud against student-athletes and the tutor
- Allegations that student-athletes received preferential treatment and accepted impermissible benefits
- Allegations against a former student-athlete for unethical conduct
- Failure by the institution to adequately monitor the conduct of Chris Hawkins, an individual triggering NCAA agent legislation; the social media activity of the football team for a period in 2010; and possible extra benefits triggered by agent legislation.

The notice of allegations tells the school the alleged NCAA violations the enforcement staff found during the investigation process. The school has 90 days to respond, though they may request more time. After the school issues their response, a hearing date is set with the Committee on Infractions. The Committee on Infractions meets about six times a year, usually lasting for two to three days over a weekend. Most recently the committee heard cases related to Boise State and Tennessee. Ohio State, the grandaddy of NCAA cases these days, is currently scheduled to go before the committee on Aug. 12.

The NCAA requested that the school limit public comments on the details of the investigation and the Notice of Allegations until the hearing before the Committee on Infractions, which has been set for Oct. 28. However, head coach Butch Davis did offer a statement in the official release.

“I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch," Davis said. "I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously."

Chancellor Holden Thorp also took responsibility for the allegations, but also credited the football program's cooperation with the NCAA during this year-long process.

“I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position," Thorp said. "We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football.”

It is not until after the hearing the Committee on Infractions will put together their final report, which will include the penalties for the violations. Different forms of NCAA sanctions include reduced scholarships, postseason bans, vacated wins, recruiting restrictions, and television bans. In recent cases Michigan. USC, Florida State, Texas Tech, and Alabama have received some form of NCAA sanctions.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 5:01 pm
 

UNC receives Letter of Inquiry from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Last week, InsideCarolina.com reported that UNC was expecting to receive their Notice of Allegations from the NCAA sometime around the end of the this week. As we learned in the Ohio State case, the Notice of Allegations gives the school an idea of what charges they are facing for different violations. On Tuesday, UNC received their official Letter of Inquiry from the NCAA.

According to NCAA Enforcement Procedures, the Letter of Inquiry is sent to tell the university that the enforcement staff will be investigating the school. After the letter of inquiry is set, a notice of allegations must be sent within six months.

For the Tar Heels' football program, they did not need any notice to realize they are currently under investigation. This is merely the next official step in advancing the official process. The Notice of Allegations could come on Thursday or Friday, as InsideCarolina.com reported last week. Or the inquiry could be extended, and the notice may not be issued for 5-6 months from now. With the NCAA, you can never be sure on timetable - so we will sit and wait with the rest of the college football community as North Carolina waits to hear a definitive word on the eventual allegations.
Posted on: June 4, 2011 12:15 pm
Edited on: June 4, 2011 12:18 pm
 

Report: UNC to receive notice of allegations soon

Posted by Chip Patterson

With every NCAA investigation there are different pivotal steps in the process, one of the most relevant in regards to possible punishments is the notice of allegations. According to a report on InsideCarolina.com, the NCAA has told UNC officials to expect a notice of allegations "on or around June 10" as a result from the investigation into improper benefits and academic misconduct within the football program.

The report cites sources who believe that the notice of allegations will highlight nine different infractions, mostly stemming from previous relationships with assistant coach John Blake, tutor Jennifer Wiley, and former player Chris Hawkins. The loss of scholarships and probation is expected, and some close to the program believe forfeiting wins is a possibility. It is widely assumed at this point that North Carolina will avoid the "lack of institutional control" charge.

Keep it here at the Eye on College Football for more on this story as it develops.
Posted on: March 21, 2011 4:37 pm
Edited on: March 21, 2011 4:39 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: North Carolina

Posted by Chip Patterson

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice . So we here at the Eye on College Football  will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at North Carolina , who started spring practice last Wednesday
.

Is it possible that the suspensions of 2010 better prepared the Tar Heels for 2011?

With how publicized the program has been in the last 12 months, it is easy to forget that North Carolina head coach Butch Davis is only entering his fifth year in Chapel Hill. Davis had plans of bringing top notch talent to North Carolina, and the records show that it has worked. After going 4-8 in year one, Davis has rattled off three straight 8-5 seasons and in 2010 delivered the first bowl win for North Carolina since 2001.

But the dark cloud has not completely been lifted off the North Carolina football program. After finishing with that Music Bowl victory, too many Tar Heel fans were left saying "what if?" What if North Carolina had all of their suspended players for the whole season? Bruce Feldman of ESPN.com wrote that if all of North Carolina's suspended players had played the Tar Heels might have contended for a national championship. Obviously this claim is a little far-fetched, but with 12 Tar Heels showing their stuff in the NFL combine, it is easy to see why fans are asking the "what ifs'."

With all that talent at the NFL combine, you would think that there would be a drop-off for North Carolina coming into 2011. But the players, and those close to the program do not expect a drop-off at all. When you have a recruiter like Butch Davis you don't need to rebuild, you just reload.

With all of those players missing action early in the season (and some for the entire year), a crop of young talent got to see the field much earlier than expected. Those players are back for 2011, and are ready to form their own impressive combine group. At least 12 backups saw much more action than they ever expected in last year's season opener against LSU. The game, played in the Georgia Dome, was a real taste of big-time southern football for those players. They will take those experiences on the field, and enter spring practice hungry.

On the defensive side of the ball the Tar Heels only return six starters, but many of the reserves saw significant action on the field due to suspension and/or injury. The playmaking ability of Bruce Carter and Quan Sturdivant will be missed, but look this spring for significant changes in the attitudes of Zach Brown and Kevin Reddick. It will be their duty to carry on the torch from the previous two star linebackers. The line is back with even more depth, and most of the secondary got to see the field during the suspensions of Deuntae Williams (4 games) and Kendrick Burney (6 games).

Things are less certain for the offense. Most important for the Tar Heels offense will be seeing how Bryn Renner does stepping into the starting role. In his four years on the field, Yates set the school records for career and single-season passing yards, as well as single season total offense. Now he passes the torch to Renner, who has been taking notes for the last two years.

"I learned everything I knew to be a college quarterback from him," Renner said after his first practice as the starting signal-caller. "Just the way he handled himself on and off the field, and the way he conducted himself on the field, so I learned a lot from him."

Renner enters spring practice as the starter, but he will be pushed for the job. With A.J. Blue healthy, there will be an open competition for the backup spot with Braden Hanson and the highly sought-after Marquise Williams, who enrolled early. The hope being that the competition will only improve all of the quarterbacks, giving offensive coordinator John Shoop some comfortable depth at the quarterback position.

One thing that Renner does have going for him from the beginning is a talented crop of returning wide receivers. Dwight Jones, Erik Highsmith, and Jheranie Boyd are all familiar with Renner from practice in previous years and should waste no time getting their timing back. Ryan Houston, who led the Tar Heels in rushing TD's in 2009, is back after redshirting a year ago and should help take the pressure off the first-time starter.

"We are really excited to get Ryan back, that was a big help," Renner explained. "I'm really excited to see Giovanni [Bernard], I think he's going to be a great player and has great upside. I'm really looking forward to handing the ball off to those two guys."

Despite the optimism and excitement from the players, there still is an unresolved NCAA investigation. While the athletic department remains optimistic that no major sanctions will be placed on the program, there is the possibility that a punishment will be handed down from the NCAA that could hurt the Tar Heels' chances of continuing the postseason streak that Davis has established.

But until then, the expectations are the same in Chapel Hill, and the campaign to return to a bowl in 2011 has already begun.

Click here for more Spring Practice Primers
Posted on: November 18, 2010 4:59 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2010 5:03 pm
 

UNC Chancellor: No reason to make staff changes

Posted by Chip Patterson

At Thursday morning's Board of Trustees meeting in Chapel Hill, North Carolina chancellor Holden Thorp and athletic director Dick Baddour gave an update on the state of the football program.  With the NCAA's ruling on the final two players, the ineligibility of Devon Ramsey and Michael McAdoo, the ongoing investigation conducted by the NCAA and the university is coming to a close.  Chancellor Thorp also informed the board that the University is planning no self-imposed sanctions on the football program.  The school's investigators will turn over all of their findings to the NCAA enforcement staff, at which point they will learn what, if any, sanctions will be issued.

Thorp also took the opportunity to make a statement on the future of head coach Butch Davis.  Throughout the ongoing investigation, Davis has caught a lot of heat letting these improprieties go unnoticed for as long as they did, and earlier in the season many fans were calling for a mid-season resignation.  According to Chancellor Thorp, the University has "found no reason to make any more changes" to the coaching staff.  The "more changes" phrase of course being a reference to the resignation of assistant coach John Blake, who has been connected with the improper benefits and ties to agents, and left Chapel Hill "for the better of the program."
Posted on: October 11, 2010 11:11 am
Edited on: October 11, 2010 11:24 am
 

UNC: Austin dismissed. Little, Quinn ineligible

Posted by Chip Patterson

Two days after climbing over the .500 mark with a 21-16 victory over the Clemson Tigers, the tone quickly changed in Chapel Hill with the news that three of the Tar Heels' suspended stars will never again take the field in a North Carolina uniform.

Defensive tackle Marvin Austin has been suspended indefinitely from the team since September 1 for violating team rules.  A university release on Monday announced that Austin has been dismissed from the program for "violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules."  The basis for the dismissal was information gathered from the join NCAA investigation into improper contact with agents.  One interesting part of the announcement: the release states that Austin's case was never considered by the NCAA's reinstatement committee.  Making it appear as though this fate has been known for some time.

Additionally, the university announced that running back Greg Little and defensive end Robert Quinn have been ruled permanently ineligible by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff.  According to the details of the release, the two players not only accepted gifts and benefits, but also were not entirely truthful with the NCAA during the investigation process.

(via UNC release)
The university declared both student-athletes ineligible for violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules. According to the facts submitted by the university, the total value of the benefits is approximately $4,952 for Little and $5,642 for Quinn.

Little accepted diamond earrings, as well as travel accommodations for the Bahamas, Washington D.C. and two trips to Miami, among other benefits. Quinn accepted two black diamond watches, a pair of matching earrings and travel accommodations for a trip to Miami, among other benefits.

Based upon information gathered by the institution and the NCAA Agent, Gambling and Amateurism staff during its joint investigation, unethical conduct charges were found against both student-athletes for providing false and misleading information. According to the facts submitted by the university, each student-athlete was not truthful during three separate interviews with university and NCAA enforcement staff members. Further, Little and Quinn only provided more accurate information when presented with evidence that was contrary to their assertions.
If there is anything we have learned from the recent cases of Bruce Pearl and Dez Bryant, it is that the NCAA does not appreciate dishonesty.  While UNC AD Dick Baddour and head coach Butch Davis have openly boasted their "full cooperation" with the NCAA investigation, it appears as though the players in question were not as helpful.  It does not come as a huge surprise to those near the program that the three players will not see any action in 2010, but the football program's image continues to be scarred as more details emerge from the investigation.  

There will be a press conference held at 11:30 a.m. ET to address the punishments, and there will no doubt be questions related to the dreaded "lack of institutional control."  The dishonesty from Little and Quinn to the NCAA not only killed their chances of getting back on the field, but reflected poorly on Butch Davis and the leadership in the program.  

Stay tuned to CBSSports.com for more as this story develops.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com