Tag:North Carolina suspensions
Posted on: June 22, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:56 pm
 

PODCAST: Talking UNC Notice of Allegations

Posted by Chip Patterson

Earlier today, I hopped on the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast with Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst to talk a little UNC Notice of Allegations.

"Should Butch Davis be fired?" That's the question being asked by many people after scanning the collection of charges detailed in the 42-page report from the NCAA. In reality, there was very little in the notice that was not already known thanks to some aggressive reporting by both national and local media. But the report does bring together a year of investigations into potentially major violations in several different categories involving a fair share of the most notable names on the roster.

So yes, it does look bad. On the surface, it looks very bad.

But the picture that has been painted for the NCAA by North Carolina is one of an institution struggling to deal with "rogue" members. Since John Blake did not tell UNC about the money from Gary Wichard, and Jennifer Wiley continued to provide services after no longer being employed by the school; North Carolina (and more importantly Butch Davis) can say they are sorry and try to cooperate. In fact, it is their cooperation which the institution will argue demonstrates the feeling of responsibility among those in oversight of the program.

Many people would argue that Davis, who has known Blake for "at least 30 years," should have known his reputation around coaching circles. It will be argued for years to come, that no matter what the NCAA can or cannot prove: Davis knew what Blake and Wiley were doing.

But as of Tuesday, it does not appear that the NCAA is prepared to allege wrongdoing directly against Butch Davis. Enraged fans will scream that Davis is guilty, and demand what they consider "justice." But the NCAA, similar to our own justice system, does not act based on assumption or reputation. With no evidence, it cannot be proven that Davis knew of any wrongdoing during which he did not act on as a head coach.

As you'll hear in the podcast below, a decision was made when the NCAA set foot on campus. North Carolina either had to jump ship and get rid of Davis when the scandal broke, or ride out the storm with him at the helm. If Davis has made it this long, there will be no changes to his employment AT LEAST until this process is complete.

Okay, after all that serious talk I should probably warn you that we also discuss Mascots, Adam's plan for Wolvie the Wolverine, and my early crush on college cheerleaders.


Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:13 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:57 pm
 

UNC receives Notice of Allegations from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

In June 2010 the NCAA began to investigate the North Carolina football program in regards to possible violations regarding players receiving impermissible benefits. After a tumultuous season that saw 14 players miss at least one game (with seven missing the entire season), the first steps of closure can begin with this multi-pronged investigation into the North Carolina football program.

The official Notice of Allegations (you can see the full letter here on TarHeelBlue.com), includes nine different allegations.

Three (3) of the allegations are against former North Carolina assistant coach John Blake:

- Unethical conduct for providing false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution and for failure to cooperate with the investigation.
- Blake marketed athletic abilities of student-athletes to agent Gary Wichard
- Blake received outside income that he did not report to the institution

Two (2) of the allegations are against former North Carolina tutor Jennifer Wiley:

- Unethical conduct for refusing to provide information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution
- Wiley provided extra benefits to student-athletes in the form of ravel and parking expenses, and tutoring.

The rest of the allegations: - Allegations of fraud against student-athletes and the tutor
- Allegations that student-athletes received preferential treatment and accepted impermissible benefits
- Allegations against a former student-athlete for unethical conduct
- Failure by the institution to adequately monitor the conduct of Chris Hawkins, an individual triggering NCAA agent legislation; the social media activity of the football team for a period in 2010; and possible extra benefits triggered by agent legislation.

The notice of allegations tells the school the alleged NCAA violations the enforcement staff found during the investigation process. The school has 90 days to respond, though they may request more time. After the school issues their response, a hearing date is set with the Committee on Infractions. The Committee on Infractions meets about six times a year, usually lasting for two to three days over a weekend. Most recently the committee heard cases related to Boise State and Tennessee. Ohio State, the grandaddy of NCAA cases these days, is currently scheduled to go before the committee on Aug. 12.

The NCAA requested that the school limit public comments on the details of the investigation and the Notice of Allegations until the hearing before the Committee on Infractions, which has been set for Oct. 28. However, head coach Butch Davis did offer a statement in the official release.

“I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch," Davis said. "I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously."

Chancellor Holden Thorp also took responsibility for the allegations, but also credited the football program's cooperation with the NCAA during this year-long process.

“I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position," Thorp said. "We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football.”

It is not until after the hearing the Committee on Infractions will put together their final report, which will include the penalties for the violations. Different forms of NCAA sanctions include reduced scholarships, postseason bans, vacated wins, recruiting restrictions, and television bans. In recent cases Michigan. USC, Florida State, Texas Tech, and Alabama have received some form of NCAA sanctions.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 5:01 pm
 

UNC receives Letter of Inquiry from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Last week, InsideCarolina.com reported that UNC was expecting to receive their Notice of Allegations from the NCAA sometime around the end of the this week. As we learned in the Ohio State case, the Notice of Allegations gives the school an idea of what charges they are facing for different violations. On Tuesday, UNC received their official Letter of Inquiry from the NCAA.

According to NCAA Enforcement Procedures, the Letter of Inquiry is sent to tell the university that the enforcement staff will be investigating the school. After the letter of inquiry is set, a notice of allegations must be sent within six months.

For the Tar Heels' football program, they did not need any notice to realize they are currently under investigation. This is merely the next official step in advancing the official process. The Notice of Allegations could come on Thursday or Friday, as InsideCarolina.com reported last week. Or the inquiry could be extended, and the notice may not be issued for 5-6 months from now. With the NCAA, you can never be sure on timetable - so we will sit and wait with the rest of the college football community as North Carolina waits to hear a definitive word on the eventual allegations.
Posted on: November 18, 2010 4:59 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2010 5:03 pm
 

UNC Chancellor: No reason to make staff changes

Posted by Chip Patterson

At Thursday morning's Board of Trustees meeting in Chapel Hill, North Carolina chancellor Holden Thorp and athletic director Dick Baddour gave an update on the state of the football program.  With the NCAA's ruling on the final two players, the ineligibility of Devon Ramsey and Michael McAdoo, the ongoing investigation conducted by the NCAA and the university is coming to a close.  Chancellor Thorp also informed the board that the University is planning no self-imposed sanctions on the football program.  The school's investigators will turn over all of their findings to the NCAA enforcement staff, at which point they will learn what, if any, sanctions will be issued.

Thorp also took the opportunity to make a statement on the future of head coach Butch Davis.  Throughout the ongoing investigation, Davis has caught a lot of heat letting these improprieties go unnoticed for as long as they did, and earlier in the season many fans were calling for a mid-season resignation.  According to Chancellor Thorp, the University has "found no reason to make any more changes" to the coaching staff.  The "more changes" phrase of course being a reference to the resignation of assistant coach John Blake, who has been connected with the improper benefits and ties to agents, and left Chapel Hill "for the better of the program."
Posted on: October 11, 2010 11:11 am
Edited on: October 11, 2010 11:24 am
 

UNC: Austin dismissed. Little, Quinn ineligible

Posted by Chip Patterson

Two days after climbing over the .500 mark with a 21-16 victory over the Clemson Tigers, the tone quickly changed in Chapel Hill with the news that three of the Tar Heels' suspended stars will never again take the field in a North Carolina uniform.

Defensive tackle Marvin Austin has been suspended indefinitely from the team since September 1 for violating team rules.  A university release on Monday announced that Austin has been dismissed from the program for "violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules."  The basis for the dismissal was information gathered from the join NCAA investigation into improper contact with agents.  One interesting part of the announcement: the release states that Austin's case was never considered by the NCAA's reinstatement committee.  Making it appear as though this fate has been known for some time.

Additionally, the university announced that running back Greg Little and defensive end Robert Quinn have been ruled permanently ineligible by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff.  According to the details of the release, the two players not only accepted gifts and benefits, but also were not entirely truthful with the NCAA during the investigation process.

(via UNC release)
The university declared both student-athletes ineligible for violations of NCAA agent benefits, preferential treatment and ethical conduct rules. According to the facts submitted by the university, the total value of the benefits is approximately $4,952 for Little and $5,642 for Quinn.

Little accepted diamond earrings, as well as travel accommodations for the Bahamas, Washington D.C. and two trips to Miami, among other benefits. Quinn accepted two black diamond watches, a pair of matching earrings and travel accommodations for a trip to Miami, among other benefits.

Based upon information gathered by the institution and the NCAA Agent, Gambling and Amateurism staff during its joint investigation, unethical conduct charges were found against both student-athletes for providing false and misleading information. According to the facts submitted by the university, each student-athlete was not truthful during three separate interviews with university and NCAA enforcement staff members. Further, Little and Quinn only provided more accurate information when presented with evidence that was contrary to their assertions.
If there is anything we have learned from the recent cases of Bruce Pearl and Dez Bryant, it is that the NCAA does not appreciate dishonesty.  While UNC AD Dick Baddour and head coach Butch Davis have openly boasted their "full cooperation" with the NCAA investigation, it appears as though the players in question were not as helpful.  It does not come as a huge surprise to those near the program that the three players will not see any action in 2010, but the football program's image continues to be scarred as more details emerge from the investigation.  

There will be a press conference held at 11:30 a.m. ET to address the punishments, and there will no doubt be questions related to the dreaded "lack of institutional control."  The dishonesty from Little and Quinn to the NCAA not only killed their chances of getting back on the field, but reflected poorly on Butch Davis and the leadership in the program.  

Stay tuned to CBSSports.com for more as this story develops.

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Posted on: September 28, 2010 10:44 am
 

Tar Heels could lose two more starters to injury

Posted by Chip Patterson

The Tar Heels have dealt with serious personnel issues the entire season, arguably an issue that has cost them at least one victory out of their 1-2 start.  With the status of ten players still undetermined, and defensive backs Kendric Burney and Deunta Williams suspended for at least another week (Burney is out for three more games), the last thing North Carolina wants to hear is the word "injury."

But with running back Johnny White and starting linebacker Quan Sturdivant both suffering injuries in the Tar Heels 17-13 victory at Rutgers, an already weakened starting lineup looks like it could be even thinner.

White turned his right ankle in the third quarter, and Sturdivant tweaked his left hamstring tackling quarterback Tom Savage in the fourth.  Neither starter returned the game, and head coach Butch Davis is unsure whether if they will be available against ECU on Saturday.  

"We'll get a much better, clearer picture as to their availability probably by Thursday," Davis said Monday. "They'll get all the treatment that they can and we'll have a better idea later on in the week."  

With 12 players still sidelined by an NCAA investigation, UNC can't afford to lose any available starters, not ones as valuable as White and Sturdivant, senior quarterback T.J. Yates said.  

"To not have one of those guys would be big for us, especially Quan on defense," Yates said. "He's the guy that gets everybody going; he's the quarterback over there."

"I'm pretty confident Johnny will be back," Yates said. "We would be fine rolling with Shaun, but I think the defense would struggle without Quan."

Sturdivant was cleared to join the team just hours before they kicked off the season against LSU in Atlanta, so North Carolina has not had to play without the team's leading tackler yet this season.  He will likely be replaced by Zach Brown if he is not cleared to play.  Brown saw significant time against LSU and has been a frequent contributor on special teams.

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Posted on: September 18, 2010 11:23 am
 

UNC will miss 12 players against Georgia Tech

Posted by Chip Patterson

North Carolina has had two weeks since playing their last game against LSU in their season opener.  The off week provided time for North Carolina to continue to deal with their off-field issues, and try to clear more players for Saturday's matchup against division rival, Georgia Tech.  

The Tar Heels received good news with starting running back Shaun Draughn being cleared to play, but that's about where the good news ends.  Not only has North Carolina come under fire for their association with Chris Hawkins, but they were not able to clear any of the remaining 12 players for Saturday's game.

The Tar Heels were able to clear starting linebackers Bruce Carter and Quan Sturdivant the day before the LSU game, and there was some speculation that they may be able to replicate that before Georgia Tech.  But with the news today that no other players would be cleared, North Carolina must try to pick up a much-needed win against Paul Johnson's offense without two starting defensive lineman and most of their starting secondary.



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Posted on: September 3, 2010 10:02 am
 

12-15 Tar Heels will not play against LSU

Posted by Chip Patterson

When North Carolina departed for Atlanta on Friday morning, there a few faces missing from the group.  

Head Coach Butch Davis had already announced that Marvin Austin was suspended indefinitely and sources revealed late Thursday that Greg Little also would not make the trip.  Austin and Little were both central figures in the NCAA's initial agent-related investigation earlier this summer.

But the worst-case scenario for North Carolina came true on Friday morning, with the official announcement from the university that a minimum of 12 and potentially 15 players would not be playing against LSU.

The University of North Carolina has declared six student-athletes on the football team ineligible for Saturday's season-opening game for violating school and/or NCAA rules. The University is also withholding at least six other student-athletes from Saturday's game while the investigation continues.

The six ineligible student-athletes include: defensive tackle Marvin Austin, cornerback Charles Brown, cornerback Kendric Burney, wide receiver Greg Little, defensive end Michael McAdoo and defensive end Robert Quinn.

Six other student-athletes who will be withheld from Saturday's game include: tailback Shaun Draughn, defensive end Linwan Euwell, safety Brian Gupton, tailback Ryan Houston, safety Da'Norris Searcy and safety Jonathan Smith.

The number of games that those 12 student-athletes may miss has not been determined at this time. The investigation continues to include both agent-related and academic issues.

The University also continues to work today with the NCAA to determine the eligibility status of three other student-athletes. Those three will not accompany the team to Atlanta on Friday morning. Further information will be announced when a decision on their status for the game is reached. 



   
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com