Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Notice of Allegations
Posted on: June 23, 2011 1:59 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:55 pm
 

Welcome to Compliance 2.0

Posted by Chip Patterson

North Carolina's Notice of Allegations, delivered to the school earlier this week by the NCAA, is certainly stocked with all kinds of facts, figures, and redacted information to be discussed and debated between now and the Oct. 28 hearing with Committee on Infractions. The case will end up being a standard for NCAA enforcement in modern college football history. It may be buried well below the lede on Sportscenter, but trust me: we will remember this case.

One aspect of the case that is particularly notable is in alleged violation 9b.
In February through June 2010, the institution did not adequately and consistently monitor social networking activity that visibly illustrated potential amateurism violations within the football program, which delayed the institution's discovery and compounded the provision of impermissible benefits provided in Allegation Nos. 4-a, 4-c, 4-d and 4-e.
This is where the entire investigation started. All 42 pages of letters and allegations can be summed up in a series of 140-character tweets from Greg Little and Marvin Austin. Well, technically, it was a combination of tweeting some Rick Ross lyrics, TwitPic'ing pool parties and expensive dinner bills, along with some other loose evidence of misconduct.

So the NCAA is wondering how North Carolina's compliance office did not see a red flag when their star student athletes were living a lavish lifestyle in big cities the summer before their senior season. Now, being charged with Failure To Monitor, this case becomes the NCAA's official acknowledgement of social networking in collegiate sports.

Unfortunately, they are probably entering the game a little too late. Acting reactively, as usual, the NCAA has essentially let compliance offices all over the country know that this is something they should be monitoring closely. Here's the thing: it's really not that hard.

Make Twitter lists, download Tweetdeck, organize the accounts however you choose -- there of plenty of options. If the "search" function is too difficult to figure out, then require athletes to include their Twitter handle at the same time you get the rest of their contact information. Most of these student-athletes (particularly the ones most at-risk of impermissible benefits) will want as many people as possible to have unprotected access to their Twitter accounts. Amateurism rules prevent an athlete from benefiting off their own likeness financially, but Twitter allows a pro prospect to begin marketing themselves while in school. Certain athletes enjoy building their brand, interacting with fans and getting a more hands-on approach to shaping people's perception.

All the compliance office has to do is watch, and ask questions.

Recently Maryland defensive lineman and Twitter extraodinaire A.J. Francis (@The_Franchyze) tweeted a lyrics from a song by Rick Ross (surprise!) and Kanye West -- "Live Fast, Die Young."
Seems like we getting' money for the wrong things,
Look around Maseratis for the whole team.
Now, someone with a common knowledge of the lyrics on Ross' 2010 release Teflon Don might recognize that quote. But none of those people are in Maryland's compliance office. To them, this seemed like a questionable Twitter-post that could possibly be dealing with impermissible benefits. No need to launch an investigation, but the office took action.



Now Francis was asked to remove the post, but I think once Compliance explained the situation he understood. There could be a discussion about free speech, but we have yet to see a Chad Ochocinco-type character challenge the authority of his school on those grounds. But the point of the matter is that if North Carolina's compliance office had been keeping an eye on the profiles of its star athletes, there could have been more immediate action to nip the wrongdoing in the bud.

So the message has been sent to compliance offices everywhere. It's time to wake up and follow your student-athletes on their social networking sites. The fans are, most of the media is, and for both of those groups to find out about a potential violations well before the compliance office is unacceptable.

Go ahead, just follow them. Trust me, most student-athletes will be happy to raise their follower/friend count.

(Image Credit: Twitter)
Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:13 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:57 pm
 

UNC receives Notice of Allegations from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

In June 2010 the NCAA began to investigate the North Carolina football program in regards to possible violations regarding players receiving impermissible benefits. After a tumultuous season that saw 14 players miss at least one game (with seven missing the entire season), the first steps of closure can begin with this multi-pronged investigation into the North Carolina football program.

The official Notice of Allegations (you can see the full letter here on TarHeelBlue.com), includes nine different allegations.

Three (3) of the allegations are against former North Carolina assistant coach John Blake:

- Unethical conduct for providing false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution and for failure to cooperate with the investigation.
- Blake marketed athletic abilities of student-athletes to agent Gary Wichard
- Blake received outside income that he did not report to the institution

Two (2) of the allegations are against former North Carolina tutor Jennifer Wiley:

- Unethical conduct for refusing to provide information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution
- Wiley provided extra benefits to student-athletes in the form of ravel and parking expenses, and tutoring.

The rest of the allegations: - Allegations of fraud against student-athletes and the tutor
- Allegations that student-athletes received preferential treatment and accepted impermissible benefits
- Allegations against a former student-athlete for unethical conduct
- Failure by the institution to adequately monitor the conduct of Chris Hawkins, an individual triggering NCAA agent legislation; the social media activity of the football team for a period in 2010; and possible extra benefits triggered by agent legislation.

The notice of allegations tells the school the alleged NCAA violations the enforcement staff found during the investigation process. The school has 90 days to respond, though they may request more time. After the school issues their response, a hearing date is set with the Committee on Infractions. The Committee on Infractions meets about six times a year, usually lasting for two to three days over a weekend. Most recently the committee heard cases related to Boise State and Tennessee. Ohio State, the grandaddy of NCAA cases these days, is currently scheduled to go before the committee on Aug. 12.

The NCAA requested that the school limit public comments on the details of the investigation and the Notice of Allegations until the hearing before the Committee on Infractions, which has been set for Oct. 28. However, head coach Butch Davis did offer a statement in the official release.

“I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch," Davis said. "I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously."

Chancellor Holden Thorp also took responsibility for the allegations, but also credited the football program's cooperation with the NCAA during this year-long process.

“I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position," Thorp said. "We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football.”

It is not until after the hearing the Committee on Infractions will put together their final report, which will include the penalties for the violations. Different forms of NCAA sanctions include reduced scholarships, postseason bans, vacated wins, recruiting restrictions, and television bans. In recent cases Michigan. USC, Florida State, Texas Tech, and Alabama have received some form of NCAA sanctions.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 5:01 pm
 

UNC receives Letter of Inquiry from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Last week, InsideCarolina.com reported that UNC was expecting to receive their Notice of Allegations from the NCAA sometime around the end of the this week. As we learned in the Ohio State case, the Notice of Allegations gives the school an idea of what charges they are facing for different violations. On Tuesday, UNC received their official Letter of Inquiry from the NCAA.

According to NCAA Enforcement Procedures, the Letter of Inquiry is sent to tell the university that the enforcement staff will be investigating the school. After the letter of inquiry is set, a notice of allegations must be sent within six months.

For the Tar Heels' football program, they did not need any notice to realize they are currently under investigation. This is merely the next official step in advancing the official process. The Notice of Allegations could come on Thursday or Friday, as InsideCarolina.com reported last week. Or the inquiry could be extended, and the notice may not be issued for 5-6 months from now. With the NCAA, you can never be sure on timetable - so we will sit and wait with the rest of the college football community as North Carolina waits to hear a definitive word on the eventual allegations.
Posted on: June 4, 2011 12:15 pm
Edited on: June 4, 2011 12:18 pm
 

Report: UNC to receive notice of allegations soon

Posted by Chip Patterson

With every NCAA investigation there are different pivotal steps in the process, one of the most relevant in regards to possible punishments is the notice of allegations. According to a report on InsideCarolina.com, the NCAA has told UNC officials to expect a notice of allegations "on or around June 10" as a result from the investigation into improper benefits and academic misconduct within the football program.

The report cites sources who believe that the notice of allegations will highlight nine different infractions, mostly stemming from previous relationships with assistant coach John Blake, tutor Jennifer Wiley, and former player Chris Hawkins. The loss of scholarships and probation is expected, and some close to the program believe forfeiting wins is a possibility. It is widely assumed at this point that North Carolina will avoid the "lack of institutional control" charge.

Keep it here at the Eye on College Football for more on this story as it develops.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com