Tag:Ohio State suspensions
Posted on: September 13, 2011 6:03 pm
Edited on: September 13, 2011 6:49 pm
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NCAA reinstates three suspended Buckeyes

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Ohio State may not be at full strength in terms of getting players back on the field, but it's getting there. The NCAA has officially reinstated RB Jordan Hall, CB Travis Howard and S Corey Brown as of today, ending the three Buckeyes' two-week suspension for accepting money from a booster at a recent fundraiser. 

According to the NCAA, whose full statement on the reinstatement is linked here, the three players will be forced to repay the money they received from the booster, with the money going to an undisclosed charity.

The reinstatement means that the players have finally gotten their stories straight about where the money came from, which was not the case last week when two different people (a former player and a booster) were named as sources for the money in Ohio State documents. That clearly didn't sit well with the NCAA, and the suspensions continued through the Toledo game.

Nonetheless, Ohio State didn't have any public gripe about the length of the investigation and suspensions. “The university appreciates the NCAA’s expeditious response in reinstating these three student athletes,” said Gene Smith, Ohio State Director of Athletics. 

The NCAA's statement ends on this well-known, but still ominous note (emphasis ours):

Reinstatement decisions are independent of the NCAA enforcement process and typically are made once the facts of the student-athlete’s involvement are determined. This is typically well in advance of infractions decisions. The enforcement investigation into the Ohio State University is ongoing.

In other words, this situation isn't fully resolved in the NCAA's eyes, but at the very least the three players involved can get back on the field.

One must wonder when the boosters in Columbus are going to stop providing benefits to players. It may be a noble gesture and the rules may be illegitimate in the boosters' eyes, but they are still the rules, and the more those rules are broken the worse off Ohio State is going to be. It seems very counterintuitive that a "booster" would take such destructive action, then, but such is the world we live in.



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Posted on: September 9, 2011 6:26 pm
Edited on: September 9, 2011 6:33 pm
 

NCAA hasn't reinstated three Ohio State players

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Last week, Ohio State suspended RB Jordan Hall, CB Travis Howard and S Corey Brown for the Akron game after learning the three players had accepted $200 for their presence at a Cleveland charity event. Ohio State expected its three suspended players to be reinstated by the NCAA for this week's game at Toledo following the conclusion of the NCAA's investigation.

Problem: the NCAA never agreed to a one-game suspension. As a result, all three players will be sitting out their second straight game.

Here's the official statement from Ohio State:

The three Ohio State University football players suspended for last week's game have not been reinstated by the NCAA and will not participate in the game Saturday against the University of Toledo. The university continues to work with the NCAA on the reinstatement process and is hopeful that the student-athletes will be reinstated soon. The university will have no further comment. 

On its face, this appears to run counter to the NCAA's speedy reinstatement of several suspended Miami players who had accepted much more than $200 from disgraced booster Nevin Shapiro. The problem for Ohio State is that this is more than an issue of just punishment; the NCAA is not satisfied with the results of its investigation, and the fact that the three players gave conflicting reports to officials and investigators about why they were at the fundraiser and who paid them cannot possibly help their case for an expedited reinstatement.

To that end, here is the official statement from the NCAA (emphasis ours):

Contrary to recent media reports, Ohio State football student-athletes Corey Brown, Jordan Hall and Travis Howard are not cleared to compete in the game on Saturday with University of Toledo. The nature and scope of their violations merit a minimum two-game suspension. In addition, the facts submitted by the university have raised further questions that need to be answered before the reinstatement process is complete. 

Two of the three suspended players named a former Buckeye as the source of the money, and the third named a "representative of athletics interests." All names were redacted by Ohio State on the documents acquired by the Columbus Dispatch.

It is strange that we live in a world where athletes in a multi-billion dollar sport/industry can be taken out of competition for something as insignificant as accepting a $200 gift, and it's been made clear recently that Ohio State has a few boosters who don't have much respect for those rules, but they are still the rules. So as long as giving money to players is still illegal, as long as the NCAA's sniffing around Columbus because of previous violations, and as long as the NCAA won't reinstate players who are being evasive with an investigation, it strongly behooves everybody involved with the Ohio State program to follow the NCAA's rules to a T. To do anything less is demonstrably harmful to the program, and it's strange that so many people around the team -- from Jim Tressel to everyone else who evidently wants to give these players an extra little something -- don't seem to realize this.

Posted on: May 18, 2011 9:01 am
Edited on: May 18, 2011 9:04 am
 

Delany: Ohio State interest is 'not positive'

Posted by Chip Patterson

Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany found himself in Seattle last August, standing beside Michigan as they faced the NCAA Committee on Infractions for violations under former head coach Rich Rodriguez. However, it is not hard to figure out that the pressure on the conference is much more substantial as Ohio State prepares for their meeting with the COI on Aug. 12 in Indianapolis. Delaney spoke to AnnArbor.com at the Big Ten spring meetings on Tuesday, only mentioning that the Ohio State scandal has generated "a lot of interest," and not the positive kind of interest.

“It’s a difficult set of facts and a difficult circumstance,” Delany said. “In due respect, I think the facts are known and we have a hearing date and we’ll go to a hearing and we’ll answer the questions and present the case and the NCAA will make a determination. And that’s the juncture at which time you’ll be able to absorb sort of exactly what it means in the short and the long term.

“Right now, to me, it’s just talking about something well in advance.”

That difficult set of facts and circumstances are ones that leave very little room for reasonable doubt when it comes to Jim Tressel's negligence in reporting potential violations. Tressel has been present at the Big Ten meetings, but has not spoken with the media since his arrival. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith is also present at the meetings, but he too has steered clear of the media. Since the NCAA sent their notice of allegations in April, the future of Ohio State football has been murky, at best, for Tressel and Co. I think if you Buckeye fans for their opinion on the situation, their response will likely be very similar to Delany.
Posted on: May 2, 2011 12:11 pm
 

Report: Buckeyes' Bell suspended for season

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The longest offseason in recent Ohio State memory just got a tiniest bit longer.

According to 247Sports affiliate Bucknuts, redshirt sophomore linebacker Dorian Bell has been suspended for the duration of the 2011 season "for a third violation of the same team rule." Bell had already missed last year's Sugar Bowl victory through suspension and would have missed the season opener against Akron, but will now join head coach Jim Tressel and the "Buckeye Five" on the sidelines for the both the first five games of 2011 and longer.

Bell's suspension won't be quite as damaging as those to Tressel or Terrelle Pryor -- he has nine career total tackles -- but it's not exactly like losing the second-string waterboy, either. Bell had enjoyed a strong spring, putting himself into the mix to potentially start at one outside linebacker position and all-but sealing himself a spot in the regular playing rotation. A former five-star recruit out of Monroeville (Pa.), Bell seemed like a strong candidate to have a breakout season.

That breakout would have been a huge help to his team, too, who saw multi-year linebacker starters Brian Rolle and Ross Homan both drafted Saturday; the unit could use both the depth and star potential Bell represented.

But unless Bell is reinstated, it looks like that Depth and potential will have to wait until 2012 at the earliest.



Posted on: April 27, 2011 9:59 am
Edited on: April 27, 2011 10:25 am
 

Jim Tressel could lose $3.7M if fired

Posted by Chip Patterson

Ever since the release of the NCAA's Notice of Allegations to Ohio State, much of the focus of Tattoogate has shifted from the program and directly on head coach Jim Tressel.  The NCAA said Tressel "failed to deport himself in accordance with the honesty and integrity normally associated with the conduct and administration of intercollegiate athletics" when he did not notify school officials of the possible violations associated with the tattoo parlor.  

The heat on Tressel has raised a question of whether he might be fired, or resign because of these new developments.  According to the Dayton Business Journal, Tressel getting fired or resigning could cost him $3.7 million a year.  Tressel is contracted at that salary through 2014, but the termination-for-cause provisions in his contract would release Ohio State from that financial responsibility.

According to a copy of his contract obtained by the Journal, one of the termination-for-cause provisions is "fraud or dishonesty in preparing, falsifying, submitting or altering documents or records of Ohio State, NCAA or the Big Ten."
More on the Ohio State investigation

After receiving information regarding possible violations and the tattoo parlor (not to mention forwarding the emails), Tressel knowingly signed a routine compliance form stating he was not aware of any possible violations.  If Ohio State is looking for a reason to get Tressel out, the "fraud or dishonesty" clause might be a good place to start.
Posted on: April 25, 2011 10:19 am
Edited on: April 25, 2011 4:17 pm
 

Report: NCAA hands OSU "notice of allegations"

Posted by Chip Patterson

As Ohio State prepares for an eventual ruling from the NCAA regarding knowledge of players receiving improper benefits, college football's governing body issued the school an official "Notice of Allegations" letter on Monday.  The document detailed the potential violations committed both by the football program and individually by head coach Jim Tressel.  The Columbus Dispatch, which also received a copy of the letter, reported that Ohio State could face "the most severe NCAA penalties to its storied football program."

The official wording in the letter was that the Buckeyes, and Tressel in particular, faced charges that are being considered "potential major violations."  The 13-page document also points a very stern finger at the iconic head coach, claiming Tressel "permitted football student-athletes to participate in intercollegiate athletics while ineligible" and declaring that he "failed to deport himself ... (with) honesty and integrity".  That last "honesty" part is where things get particularly difficult for Tressel, who signed and dated a compliance form last September that acknowledged he was unaware any possible NCAA violations.  

As more details continue to be released from the NCAA investigation as well as efforts by the local media, that "honesty" bit gets tougher for Tressel.  Earlier Monday the Dispatch reported the findings from an email request that reveal much more contact between the head coach and other people involved in the accusations.  University president Gordon Gee, athletic director Gene Smith, and most importantly Ohio State's compliance office, were not included in the series of phone calls and emails around the time of Tressel receiving the tip.

The trouble began for the Buckeyes' head coach when he received an email from a former Ohio State player and current Columbus lawyer, Christopher Cicero. Cicero informed Tressel that a Federal raid of a local tattoo parlor turned up several thousands of dollars worth of Ohio State memorabillia.  Tressel responded to the lawyer that he would "get on it ASAP," and then proceeded to contact Ted Sarniak - a local Pennsylvania businessman and advisor/mentor to Terrelle Pryor.  

The notice from the NCAA did say the case is closed against the five players who exchanged memorabillia for cash, free/discounted tattoos, and discounts/loans towards the purchase of a used vehicle. The NCAA has said that the players (Pryor, Dan Herron, DeVier Posey, Mike Adams, Solomon Thomas and Jordan Whiting) will not face further punishment. They have been suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season.  However, the program could still receive punishment for fielding ineligible players, and obviously Tressel faces much more serious charges invidually.

Another thing that the letter included was a notice that Ohio State could be treated as a repeat-offender by the NCAA because of violations stemming from Troy Smith and former basketball coach Jim O'Brien.  Both instances involved improper benefits as well, however neither was damning enough to warrant severe punishment by itself.  If the Buckeyes' program is treated as a repeat offender, they could be looking at the possibility of a postseason ban or the loss of scholarships.

The one piece of good news for Ohio State fans fearful of the future is the lack of the phrase "institutional control."  Those phrases, which normally lead to violations with the harshest penalties, are designed for programs which have insufficient compliance offices.  For a program like Ohio State to get hit with such a violations would rock the college football world, but thankfully for their fans and alumni it looks like they will dodge that bullet.

READ MORE: CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd asks "What's next for Ohio State?"

Click here for the full "Notice of Allegations" from the NCAA to Ohio State President Gordon Gee [via Columbus Dispatch]

Keep it here at CBSSports.com and the Eye on College Football for more on the Ohio State investigation as it develops. 



Posted on: March 17, 2011 8:40 pm
Edited on: March 17, 2011 8:46 pm
 

NCAA upholds OSU suspensions, Tressel to sit too

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The chances that the Ohio State Buckeyes will be contending for a Big Ten title or a national title in 2011 have just taken a hit. The suspensions of the five Ohio State players from TattooGate, the mess that got Ohio State in all this hot water in the first place, have been upheld by the NCAA.
According to this decision, Mike Adams, Daniel Herron, DeVier Posey, Terrelle Pryor and Solomon Thomas must sit out the first five games of the 2011 season for selling awards, gifts and university apparel, as well as receiving improper benefits in 2009. These student-athletes must also repay money and benefits ranging from $1,000 to $2,500.
“While we are disappointed that our appeal request was denied, we respect the NCAA and accept its ruling,” said Gene Smith, Ohio State associate vice president and athletics director. “The players are sorry for the disappointment they have caused, will learn from their mistakes, and will strive to earn the confidence and support of everyone associated with the university through their future conduct.”
“The university remains steadfast in its commitment to continually improve the compliance education process,” said Dr. John Bruno, faculty athletics representative to the Big Ten and NCAA and Ohio State professor of psychology. “We believe that we do a good job in educating our more than 900 student-athletes, but we strive to do better to help them make good decisions.
There will be no further appeals from this point, and all five players will sit out the first five games of the 2011 season. And guess what?

Jim Tressel will be joining them. For all five games. From the Columbus Dispatch:
Ohio State and football coach Jim Tressel announced tonight that he would accept a five-game suspension for his role in the scandal that brought major NCAA violations to OSU's door.
The announcement came moments after the NCAA denied Ohio State's appeal to reduce the five-game suspensions of five football players for selling memorabilia and accepting discounts on tattoos, a violation of the NCAA extra benefits rule.
Tressel had been suspended for two games and fined $250,000 by the university for his own violations, which came to light last week. A source told The Dispatch that it was his decision to increase his suspension to five games; his fine will remain the same.
The five games that Tressel and his players will miss are against Akron, Toledo, Miami, Colorado and Michigan State. While I wouldn't worry much about Akron and Toledo if I were a Buckeye fan, those games against Miami and Michigan State could pose quite a problem to a team without it's starting quarterback, running back, wide receiver and head coach.
Posted on: January 18, 2011 12:14 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2011 2:36 pm
 

A reminder: the Buckeye Five are coming back

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The Columbus Dispatch issued a kind of update this morning on the appeals process with the "Buckeye Five," the five Ohio State players -- including star juniors Terrelle Pryor, DeVier Posey and Daniel "Boom" Herron -- suspended by the NCAA for the first five games of 2011 for receiving improper benefits at a Columbus tattoo parlor (among other offenses). The appeal should begin soon, though based on the precedents set by the NCAA when reviewing similar appeals last season, it seems unlikely any of the five will have their suspensions reduced.

But the simple fact that the appeal is moving forward as planned, even after the deadline for early draft declarations, means it's worth making note of another fact: all five suspended players will return for their senior seasons.

That's not an insignificant deal. Yes, all five players reportedly promised Jim Tressel they'd return before getting the controversial OK to play in the Sugar Bowl, but it's one thing to make that promise. It's another to keep it with hundreds of thousands of dollars available in the draft and a five-game suspension waiting on the other side of the offseason.

Obviously, it's terrific news for the Buckeyes, who with their Pryor-Herron-Posey "triplets" intact should be able to make a run at yet another Big Ten championship down the 2011 stretch. But it's also a huge rebuttal to the many, many critics of the NCAA's (and Tressel's) decision to allow the players to play in the bowl game. Much of that criticism was centered around the assumption that faced with the suspensions, many of the Buckeye Five would simply declare for the draft instead, thereby avoiding punishment altogether.

We know now that's not going to happen. Pryor, Posey and Herron will "do their time," so to speak. The NCAA's form of justice, whatever you think of it, will be served.

There are still valid reasons to criticize the NCAA and Tressel for allowing the Buckeye Five to take the field in New Orleans. But "they won't get punished at all" is no longer one of them, and as frequently as that charge was levied in December, more than a few critics owe the parties involved here a retraction.

HT: DocSat .


 
 
 
 
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