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Tag:Radio Interviews
Posted on: June 28, 2011 2:42 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 4:10 pm
 

Calipari: Need superconferences to pay players

Posted by Chip Patterson

College football and college basketball are big money sports. As more and more financial transparency is demanded from the public, we are learning exactly how profitable amateur athletics can get. One person with plenty of knowledge of the cash you can stack in college sports is Kentucky head basketball coach John Calipari. Calipari recently became the proud recipient of a new contract extension that ties him to the college basketball superpower through 2019. The new deal will earn Calipari roughly $4.56 million/year, putting him just behind Nick Saban and Mack Brown when it comes to big-time college coaches. So who better to speak on the topic of collegiate athletics finances than Calipari?

That's exactly what he did when speaking to Mike Lupica on ESPN Radio. Lupica asked Calipari if he ever thought student athletes would get paid. Calipari's answer was particularly interesting, especially because it focused on needing changes to college football. (transcription via Sports Radio Interviews)
“The only way [paying student-athletes] can happen is you do the four superconferences, and those 64 or 72 schools have their own football playoff in each conference and then those four winners are semifinalists for the national title and then you have the title game and you have bowl games and all that revenue is shared between the 72 or 64 schools and then you do the same in basketball. You have their own tournament. … All the revenue from television to tournaments comes back. You get Title IX square, you get money back to the general fund … you give money to intramurals and you take care of this expense of cost-of-living expense.”
The superconference proposal has been on the table since realignment discussions got serious in the last few years. Though with five of the six BCS conferences securing new media deals (and the Big East's upcoming renegotiation in 2013), it does not appear that the formation of superconferences would be probable in the near future.

Additionally, the model loosely proposed by Calipari virtually guarantees that no mid-major school could ever win a national championship. Even in a 72-team "superconference" model, there are only 5 open spots to be filled by teams not affiliated with a current BCS conference (counting TCU as part of the Big East). Despite his previous tenures at UMass and Memphis, Calipari apparently foresees only the big-time schools being able handle the financial burden of paying student-athletes.

READ MORE: Calipari has been on this superconference kick for a while.  CLICK HERE for more from Calipari on the Eye on College Basketball 
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You know who really likes the superconference idea?  Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott.  He's very pleased with Cal's proposal. (artwork:BryanDFischer, Recruiting Guru and Pro Bono Photoshopper)
Posted on: December 14, 2010 11:26 am
Edited on: December 14, 2010 11:36 am
 

JoePa can't hear a word you're saying

Posted by Tom Fornelli

You know, it's no secret that Joe Paterno isn't exactly the youngest coach out there.  In fact, he's the complete and total opposite of that.  So it's easy to make fun of him, because it's easy to make fun of old people.  Sure, some cultures respect and revere their elders, but this is America, and unless you're between the ages of 18 and 34, nobody gives a damn about you here.

Still, maybe we should show our senior citizens more respect.  They did help lay the foundation of this great country of ours, and have forgotten more about life than most of us have learned.  That is what we should do.  What we shouldn't do?  Let's not have them no our radio shows.



Isn't he precious?

Hat tip: SB Nation
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com