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Tag:Roger Goodell
Posted on: August 15, 2011 6:08 pm
Edited on: August 15, 2011 6:09 pm
 

Terrelle Pryor still not in supplemental draft

Posted by Adam Jacobi

As the fine gentlemen at Eye On Football reported Sunday evening, Former Ohio State QB Terrelle Pryor's status for the 2011 NFL supplemental draft is still in limbo, and he's still trying to meet with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and get a definitive answer. The supplemental draft is scheduled for Wednesday, August 17, so there's clearly not a whole lot of time to be wasted here.

According to NFL rules, Pryor wouldn't be eligible for the supplemental draft unless he was kicked out of school or ruled academically ineligible. Pryor was indeed ruled permanently ineligible by Ohio State for not complying with the NCAA investigation he was involved in, so one would think that's enough to satisfy the NFL's requirements.

Now, it's plenty obvious that Pryor belongs in the NFL as soon as possible. He is clearly not going to be a member of Ohio State's football team ever again, we're already almost halfway through the CFL's 2011 season, and let's not even entertain the idea of "Terrelle Pryor, UFL rookie." However, if for whatever reason, Goodell decides that Pryor's circumstances aren't currently worthy of NFL supplemental draft inclusion, we may get the first instance in NCAA history where a student-athlete petitions to have his previous semester's grades lowered. "No no, you've got to give me an F instead of a C! I promise I cheated! Please believe me!"

But seriously. Let's let Terrelle Pryor in the NFL already, Mr. Goodell.

Posted on: July 7, 2011 12:20 pm
Edited on: July 7, 2011 12:40 pm
 

John Mackey passes away

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Former Syracuse and Baltimore Colts tight end John Mackey died Wednesday night. He was 69.

Mackey, a member of the NFL Hall of Fame, was also a former NFLPA president and helped fight for health care rights for NFL players, especially those who suffered from dementia as Mackey did during the latter years of his life.

"John Mackey was one of the great leaders in NFL history, on and off the field," NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement. "He was a Hall of Fame player who redefined the tight end position. He was a courageous advocate for his fellow NFL players as head of the NFL Players Association. He worked closely with our office on many issues through the years, including serving as the first president of the NFL Youth Football Fund. He never stopped fighting the good fight."

“John Mackey's passing is extremely difficult news for all of us," added Syracuse Director of Athletics Dr. Daryl Gross. "John was a true hero, an icon, and a leader in the world. Our hearts go out to his lovely wife, Sylvia, and his family. His impact on Syracuse will never be forgotten as his legacy will last forever. We salute and celebrate John's amazing life, as he has touched us all. God bless John Mackey.”

Mackey was also the inspiration for college football's John Mackey Award, which is given out by the Nassau County Sports Commission every season to the best tight end in college football. The watch list for the 2011 Mackey Award was released Wednesday

Posted on: February 12, 2011 12:28 pm
Edited on: February 12, 2011 12:28 pm
 

Meyer tired of the 'garbage' in college football

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Now that Urban Meyer has retired -- for now -- from coaching and begun work as a studio analyst, the question that every one seems to be asking is when he's going to be found on a sideline again. When he stepped down as head coach at Florida, he said it was to spend more time with his family. Still, you have to think that a coach who has had so much success, and is still incredibly young, is going to return.

Though in an interview with 1070 The Fan in Indianapolis, Urban said he wasn't sure. He said that there's too much "garbage" that a head coach has to deal with in the game today.

“I don’t know.  I don’t know that but everybody keeps asking me that," said Meyer. "I was watching that Super Bowl and sitting there, if you could just do the part of coaching that is allowed and not have to worry about all of that nonsense that has really developed in the college game, that is what I am familiar with.  It is out of control with that stuff right now and we have got to get that back on track.  25 years ago, and I am sure you know, if you had to deal with some of the stuff you are dealing with the off-the-field, the agent issues, the violation issues and all the garbage that is out there right now I certainly would not have gotten into coaching.  Hopefully with the powers that be and all the right people, I know one thing the NFL Commissioner has got a great outlook the way he is attacking the NFL right now and trying to bring respect and order, and I just love the way he is approaching it.  If college football gets that we will have a chance to get back to that great game we all love.”

Considering all the arrests that Meyer had to deal with during his tenure in Gainesville, you can be sure that Meyer has dealt with his fair share of the "garbage." Unfortunately for Meyer, or the game, I don't see much of anything changing in the future. College football's popularity only seems to grow every season, and with an NFL lockout looming, the game could see a huge spike in popularity in 2011.

With the growth in popularity comes more money, and as Biggie Smalls once told us, the more money you come across, the more problems you see. Though at least we won't have to deal with Puffy dancing in college football. It'd be an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty if he did.

Also, though I'm only 30 years old and can't really speak for what the game was like 25 years ago, from what I've been told, things weren't all that different in 1985. Heck, they may have been worse than they are now, it's just that there are a lot more discerning eyes keeping tabs on the sport these days. 
 
 
 
 
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