Tag:Ted Sarniak
Posted on: August 17, 2011 9:59 am
Edited on: August 17, 2011 10:00 am
 

Report: NCAA investigating Pryor's trip to Miami

Posted by Chip Patterson

The NCAA has reportedly expanded their Ohio State investigation to include a trip Terrelle Pryor took to the Miami area in March, according to a report in the Columbus Dispatch.

The findings that left left Pryor suspended for five games and lost head coach Jim Tressel his job were in connection with improper benefits regarding a tattoo parlor owner and the sale of memorabilia. When the NCAA's investigation began to focus more on Pryor directly, the star quarterback abruptly left school in June and declared his intentions to participate in the NFL's supplemental draft.

The Dispatch cites two sources who claim that the NCAA was checking into Pryor's trip to South Beach over spring break in March, a trip that may have been arranged by Jeannette, Pa. businessman Ted Sarniak.

Sarniak, if you recall, was one of the people that Tressel turned to after receiving an email tip regarding possible wrongdoing in his football program. The former Buckeyes coach defended himself saying he was looking out for Pryor's safety, and Sarniak has been a mentor to Pryor since the quarterback was in high school. But Sarniak's mentor status was addressed already by Ohio State's compliance director in 2008 when Pryor began his freshman year. The school determined that the businessman may continue his relationship with Pryor, but "the relationship must change."

The NFL was supposed to hold the supplemental draft on Wednesday, but they have decided to postpone to a later date. Pryor is one of six players hoping to get picked up in the unique player acquisition event that allows a team to trade a future pick for the opportunity to draft a player who has become ineligible for collegiate play since the January deadline.
Posted on: July 22, 2011 4:34 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 5:13 pm
 

Ohio State won't be hit with failure to monitor

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Ohio State got some good news on Friday when the NCAA announced that it had not found any new violations to charge Ohio State with, and would not be hitting the school with a "failure to monitor" charge. From the report in the Columbus Dispatch:
The NCAA has notified Ohio State University that it will not face charges of failing to appropriately monitor its football team as part of a memorabilia-sales scandal that brought down former Coach Jim Tressel.

The NCAA has not uncovered any new, unreported violations during its investigation and agrees with Ohio State that Tressel was the only university official aware of violations by his players and that he failed to report them.

"Other than (two redacted player names) and (Ted) Sarniak, there is no indication that Tressel provided or discussed the information he received ... with anyone else, particularly athletics administrators," the NCAA reported in an enforcement staff case summary.
The entire case summary can be read here. You can also read all 139 pages of the NCAA's interview with Jim Tressel here

What does this mean for Ohio State? Well, no school has ever received a postseason or television ban without being hit with the "failure to monitor" charge, and the odds of Ohio State facing such a punishment are now essentially non-existent. This also means that the blame for the entire situation will continue to lie solely at Jim Tressel's feet, and since he's already stepped down as head coach at Ohio State, the rest of the school's athletic department can sleep soundly tonight and in the future.

This news all comes after a report was released by a Columbus-area television station earlier on Friday afternoon saying that Tressel had told the NCAA he informed others at Ohio State about the transgressions of his players in December of 2010. A full month before Ohio State claims it came upon any information regarding the case.

Ohio State "categorically" denied the report, and with this latest announcement from the NCAA, it seems the NCAA felt the same way.
Posted on: June 7, 2011 11:12 am
 

Tressel, Pryor mentors in regular phone contact

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Contrary to previous e-mail releases that suggested their contact had been minimal and over the Internet, records obtained by the Columbus Dispatch and reported this morning show Jim Tressel and Terrelle Pryor's Pennsylvania mentors were in regular phone contact.

How regular?
After Tressel received an April 2, 2010, email from a former player warning him of potential NCAA violations, the coach exchanged 77 calls and text messages with and spent a total of 4 1/2 hours talking on the phone with Ted Sarniak, the hometown mentor of quarterback Terrelle Pryor in Jeannette, Pa. ...

Tressel also sent 91 text messages to Roy Hall, the current Jeannette football coach and another of Pryor's mentors. Hall previously told The Dispatch that he was not aware of the investigation and had not talked with Tressel about it.
As part of its investigation, the NCAA is reviewing the nature of Tressel's relationship with Sarniak, who the university claims does not qualify as an Ohio State booster. But in any case, the regular contact between Tressel and Sarniak and Hall will not look good contrasted with the lack of contact between the former Buckeye coach and the OSU compliance department.

Tressel also exchanged 31 text messages last Christmas Eve with Christopher Cicero, the Columbus lawyer whose original e-mail to Tressel was the coach's first notification that Buckeye players were receiving tattoo discounts and exchanging Buckeye memorabilia.

The school also released a number of phone records -- including to CBSSports.com's Bryan Fischer -- from athletic director Gene Smith, though they show no contact between Smith and Pryor's mentors or Cicero. Fischer reports there is one interesting nugget from the Smith records, however: once the story broke and Smith knew his dpeartment to be facing an NCAA investigation, he put in a call to North Carolina athletic Dick Baddour, whose school will receive its "notice of allegations from the NCAA" as soon as this week.

But as for Tressel, he faces the NCAA in a hearing Aug. 12. Today's revelations won't be the most damning evidence against him--but they won't do a thing to help him avoid NCAA sanctions, either.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com