Tag:Tom Osborne
Posted on: January 22, 2012 4:53 pm
 

The Big Ten responds to Joe Paterno's death

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Legendary former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno died early Sunday morning at the age of 85, leaving behind a football legacy that is simply unmatched. Here are some reactions from coaches and other notable figures in the Big Ten, which Penn State joined 19 years ago.

Penn State head coach Bill O'Brien: "It is with great sadness that I am compelled to deliver this message of condolence and tribute to a great man, husband, father and someone who is more than just a coach, Joe Paterno. First, on behalf of Penn State Football, we offer our sincerest condolences to the Paterno family for their loss. We also offer our condolences to the Penn State community and, in particular, to those who wore the Penn State colors, our Nittany Lion football players and alumni. Today they lost a great man, coach, mentor and, in many cases, a father figure, and we extend our deepest sympathies. The Penn State Football program is one of college football's iconic programs because it was led by an icon in the coaching profession in Joe Paterno. There are no words to express my respect for him as a man and as a coach. To be following in his footsteps at Penn State is an honor. Our families, our football program, our university and all of college football have suffered a great loss, and we will be eternally grateful for Coach Paterno's immeasurable contributions." 

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of Joe Paterno. His passing marks a tremendous loss for Penn State, college football and for countless fans, coaches and student-athletes. Our condolences go out to the Paterno family and to the entire Penn State community."

Nebraska athletic director and former head coach Tom Osborne: "I am saddened to hear the news of Joe Paterno's passing. Joe was a genuinely good person. Whenever you recruited or played against Joe you knew how he operated and that he always stood for the right things. Of course, his longevity over time and his impact on college football is remarkable. Anybody who knew Joe feels badly about the circumstances. I suspect the emotional turmoil of the last few weeks might have played into it. We offer our condolences to his family and wish them the very best." 

Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer: "I am deeply saddened to learn about the passing of Coach Joe Paterno. He was a man who I have deep respect for as a human being, as a husband and father, as a leader and as a football coach. I was very fortunate to have been able to develop a personal relationship with him, especially over the course of the last several years, and it is something that I will always cherish.

"My prayers and thoughts go out to his wife, Sue, and to their family, and also to the family he had at Penn State University. We have lost a remarkable person and someone who affected the lives of so many people in so many positive ways. His presence will be dearly missed. His legacy as a coach, as a winner and as a champion will carry on forever."

Michigan head coach Brady Hoke: "I am certainly saddened by the news today of Coach Paterno's passing. College football has lost one of its greatest, a coaching icon. Even though I was just an assistant when our teams faced one another, I feel honored to have shared the field with Joe. His players' love for him, it shows how he touched their lives and it tells who he was as a man. He will be missed. His mark on Penn State and college football will never be forgotten. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Joe's family and friends and the entire Penn State community."

Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill: "I got home last night from recruiting and my oldest daughter said she had just heard. Fifteen minutes later, my youngest daughter at Murray State called. That's two girls from a coach's family reacting to it. That really sums up his impact. It hits home. He coached for 60 years with more than 100 players per year. Think about how many lives he touched, how many good things he has done.

"From my family to the Paterno family, our prayers go out to them. It's a sad day for football, but a good day for the man upstairs.

"I would tell people not to forget what that guy has done. To coach for 60 years in one place, that just won't ever happen again. I didn't get to coach against him. But I got to coach in the Big Ten, sit next to him at a meeting and have my picture taken with him. That's something I will never forget."

Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald: "The legacy of Joe Paterno will be long lasting — not only as a football coach and mentor, but as a family man. For 62 years, Coach Paterno poured his heart and soul into a football program and university, helping countless young men reach their dreams and goals on the football field before moving on to successful careers and lives as adults. It's hard to fathom the impact that Coach Paterno has had on college football and at Penn State. His insight and wisdom will be missed. We at Northwestern send our condolences to Sue and the Paterno family." 

Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio: "On behalf of my immediate family and the Michigan State football family, we express our deepest sympathy to Joe Paterno’s wife Sue, his five children and 17 grandchildren, as well as his extended family, the Penn State football family and the entire State College community.

"Joe dedicated his life to Penn State and college football. He had unparalleled success during his 46 seasons as the head coach at Penn State. Joe was a major player who helped revolutionize the game of college football. In his six-plus decades at Penn State, he influenced and impacted countless numbers of players and people at a championship level.

"Over the past five years, my wife and I have had the privilege of spending time with both Joe and his wife Sue. We appreciated and enjoyed the time spent at our various functions together and will forever remember him as a steward of our profession."

Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema: "Coach Paterno obviously did so many wonderful things for a number of years, not only with the success of his teams on the field but the number of lives he shaped. I hope people remember his lifetime achievements. From day one, when I joined the head coaching ranks and was fortunate enough to cross paths with him at coaches meetings and various functions, he was always very engaging and complimentary of the way we did things at Wisconsin and how we played. I enjoyed competing with him at every level. Our Badger football family sends our condolences and deepest sympathies to the Penn State community and the Paterno family."

Wisconsin athletic director and former head coach Barry Alvarez: "Today is a sad day. Joe made a difference. He impacted a lot of people. He made a difference in a community, in a college and in college football. He was truly special and an icon. For someone to continue to do what he did through different generations and for such a long period of time and be effective was amazing. I’ve considered Joe a friend and a mentor. This is sad day for college football and the Penn State community. Our thoughts and prayers go out to them and the Paterno family."

For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.
Posted on: January 22, 2012 12:25 pm
Edited on: January 22, 2012 4:43 pm
 

The Big 12 responds to Paterno's death

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Though Joe Paterno spent his entire coaching career at Penn State, his impact on the world of college football is one that has been felt all over the country. After all, Penn State didn't begin playing in the Big Ten until 1990.

That impact includes the Big 12 conference, where Paterno's presence was felt all over. Former Nebraska head coach and current athletic director Tom Osborne, who spent his coaching career at Nebraska as a member of the Big 8 and Big 12, released a statement about Paterno on Sunday.

"I am saddened to hear the news of Joe Paterno’s passing," said Osborne. "Joe was a genuinely good person. Whenever you recruited or played against Joe you knew how he operated and that he always stood for the right things. Of course, his longevity over time and his impact on college football is remarkable. Anybody who knew Joe feels badly about the circumstances. I suspect the emotional turmoil of the last few weeks might have played into it. We offer our condolences to his family and wish them the very best." 

Current Texas Tech head coach Tommy Tuberville released a statement as well.

"When you think of college football and its tradition, you can't help but picture those dark glasses, black shoes and plain uniforms that were his style and mark on Penn State University," said Tuberville. "I have had the great fortune to coach against Coach Paterno four times during my career and each time I came away from those contests with a greater understanding of the game of football. A true highlight of my career, has been a 30-year relationship with Coach and his wife Sue.

"Like many coaches, I grew up watching and learning from one of the greatest tutors and mentors of the game. I am deeply saddened to learn of his passing and wish to extend my condolences to Sue and the rest of the Paterno family." 

"I've known Coach Paterno since I started coaching," said Texas head coach Mack Brown in a statement. "Sally and I built a great relationship with him and Sue over the last 10 to 15 years, and we shared many great times. I know our lives are better because we had the opportunity to spend time with them. He was a gift to us, and when we heard the sad news today, we both openly wept, not only because college football lost a great man, but we lost a great friend. I appreciate all of the advice, the attention and the time he's given us over the years. We will miss him dearly and will always cherish the wonderful memories. College football will be left with a major void because he has done so much for our game and for Penn State. It's a very sad day, and with his passing, we have lost one of the greatest coaches our game, and all sports, will ever have. He leaves us with great stories, memories and records that may never be broken. There will never be another Joe Paterno. Our thoughts and prayers are with Sue and the family."

Even former President and Texas resident George H.W. Bush knew Paterno, as the Penn State coach was one of the men who seconded Bush's presidential nomination at the 1988 Republican National Convention. 

"I was deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Joe Paterno," the former president said in a statement released Sunday. "He was an outstanding American who was respected not only on the field of play but in life generally — and he was, without a doubt, a true icon in the world of sports. I was proud that he was a friend of mine. Barbara and I send our condolences to his devoted wife Suzanne and to his wonderful family."

During Paterno's long career as a head coach at Penn State, he faced teams currently in the Big 12 in nine different bowl games -- including four of his first five -- going 7-2. In his tenure as the head coach at Penn State, the ten schools currently in the Big 12 hired 88 new head coaches -- 86 coaches total as Bill Snyder was hired twice at Kansas State, and Don Fambrough was hired twice at Kansas --whether interim or permanent.

For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.

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Posted on: October 14, 2011 4:19 pm
Edited on: October 15, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Bielema to students: No more potty-mouth, please

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

No one any younger than Joe Paterno (and not even JoePa himself) will be surprised to learn that the student sections at major college football stadiums are not the place to be if one wants to hear clean, polite, sportsmanlike King's English. But the language at Wisconsin's Camp Randall Stadium has now become so foul that no less an authority than Badger head coach Bret Bielema himself has stepped in to try and clean it up.

Bielema and Badger athletic director Barry Alvarez co-signed a letter sent to student ticket holders Thursday "asking you to end the vulgar chants at our home football games." While praising the students for helping create the loud, intimidating atmosphere that contributed to the Badgers' 48-17 throttling of Nebraska, the letter -- available in its entirety here -- also shares a number of written complaints (from both Badger and Husker fans) sent to the Wisconsin athletics office:
"During the course of the game, the student body was led in a very obscene cheer consisting of echoing 'Eat [bleep]' and '[bleep] you'. I was pretty appalled considering that not all the spectators were 18 years or older. It was not the sort of thing children should be hearing."

“I recorded the game at home. You can hear the students chant 'You [bleep]ed up' when another player commits a penalty. I can’t imagine that’s the image we want for UW.”

“I was absolutely appalled by your students. I have been to about 15 other campuses, and I have never experienced worse students than I did at Wisconsin. In all of the venues I’ve been to, I’ve never dealt with students with less class than I did at your school.”
Bielema discussed the problems further at his Thursday meeting with reporters, saying that visiting recruits and their families have been moved away from the student section in order to distance them from the stream of profanities.

“If you come into the stadium for the first time and you've never heard it, it's kind of shocking,” Bielema said, adding that "the ones that get me are when it's a parent who has a small child that now has to explain what's being said or try not to explain what's being said."

Nebraska legend (and athletic director) Tom Osborne also weighed in on the Wisconsin students on his radio call-in show this week, saying they fell short of being "decent." And by way of explanation, Osborne sent a not-so-subtle shot across the bow at the Badgers' historical fortunes vis a vis his Huskers' (emphasis added):

"I was on a golf cart with three folks who were over 90 years old," Osborne said. "We were trying to get them up to some seats. We had some rather unpleasant names called."

Osborne said he hopes Nebraska fans set the bar higher.

"I think there are probably some venues in the Big Ten that will treat people pretty well, and there are some we've been to before, and it isn't necessarily going to be that way," he said ... "I think, usually, schools with good tradition, that have won a lot in the past, are fairly tolerant. The ones that have won just lately sometimes don't know how to handle it very well."

But of course, those Wisconsin students aren't going to give the first [bleep] what Osborne thinks. Could it be different with Bielema? Will hearing directly from the man who -- after a Rose Bowl season and dominating 5-0 start -- is likely now more hero than coach in that Camp Randall student section actually bring about change?

Knowing these are 18-22 year-old college students we're talking about here: [bleep] no.


Posted on: July 5, 2011 10:55 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:48 pm
 

Nebraska self-reports textbook violations to NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Nebraska announced on Tuesday that it has self-reported NCAA violations regarding student-athletes receiving impermissible textbooks. Under NCAA rules players can receive required textbooks, but are not able to receive the benefit of the ones recommended for the course.

The university's compliance department found 248 student-athletes received impermissible textbooks between the spring of 2007 and the fall of 2010. The total value of the textbooks reportedly comes to $27,869.47. The school said 181 of the student-athletes received less than $100 worth of benefits, while the total value for the remaining 57 was more.

If this sounds like "not big a deal," then welcome to the new world of compliance in college football. With the Ohio State's, North Carolina's, USC's, and possibly Oregon's finding themselves in the headlines for all the wrong reasons, school's across the nation have taken note. A new era of pro-actively watching and investigating the activities of the department is necessary for schools to guarantee they do not suffer a similar fate as other violators. Athletic director Tom Osborne spoke on the issue Tuesday.

"The important thing to understand is that opposed to as some other NCAA cases involving books, no student-athletes received any money. In other words, they didn't sell their books and pocket the money," Osborne said. "There was no scam of that type. No one knowingly violated any rules. The student-athletes simply did what they were told they could do. The extra benefit was really simply the use of some books they probably normally would not have bought. ... There was no athletic competitive advantage. In other words, there was no recruit that came here, nobody that was given a leg up in terms of competitive ability and certainly no coaches were involved at all in this.

"The error that we made was we simply did not monitor the situation as we should have. We probably should have had regular communication with the bookstore from our compliance office, and in turn, it would have been very helpful had the bookstore at some point have given us a call and said, "Is this something we can do?"

In addition to each of the student-athletes donating the value of the textbooks received to a charity of their choice, the school imposed a $28,000.00 fine on the athletic department. Nebraska has not received any official response from the NCAA, though the violations will likely fall under the "failure to monitor" allegations. In many cases the athletes were provided benefits by the book store staff, who did not know the recommended books were not permitted to be given along with the required materials.

Posted on: May 24, 2011 1:36 am
 

Big Ten coaches worry over AAU-type 'nightmare'

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's long been a given that as big an ethical and regulatory minefield as college football recruiting is, it could be worse; it could be college basketball recruiting, an area frequently viewed as a sleaze-filled maze of AAU coaches, shoe representatives, and assorted other hangers-on all looking for their own say in their chosen recruit's recruitment.

So it's no surprise that, as the Omaha World-Herald reports, the Big Ten is looking to stem the tide of similar issues in football that might arise out of 7-on-7 tournaments:

“This is an issue that isn't very visible to the general public,'' Nebraska coach Bo Pelini said. “But it was the biggest concern that came out of our coaches meeting.

“Everyone is starting to see some of the nightmares that have gone on with AAU basketball. As coaches, we want to prevent going down that road in football ... As a conference, we want to take the lead in doing so... it's a pretty complicated issue on how to get it done. But we're all pretty unified that that's what we want to see happen.''

Penn State coach Joe Paterno said he'll do what he can to help.

“There are ‘in-between' people getting involved in starting 7-on-7 camps,'' Paterno said, “and they are literally putting kids up on auction blocks so people can get a look at them.

“And there are guys who are soliciting kids to go to a camp and getting paid to bring certain kids to camps. You don't want those people involved in our game.''

Pelini wasn't the only Big Ten representative to raise the specter of AAU hoops when discussing college football's problems. In fact, he wasn't even the only official from Nebraska to do so:

“I don't know that any legislation has been passed to keep anyone from doing it,'' Nebraska Athletic Director Tom Osborne said.

“Paying attention to it is about all we can do right now. But it looks like it could turn into AAU basketball all over again.''

Clearly, the league's football coaches and administrators are not fans of the Amateur Athletic Union's basketball efforts.

But then again, who in college athletics is? While Jim Delany's efforts in the arena of "full cost of attendance" scholarships will likely meet with some resistance, if his conference can find a way to legislate college football away from big-time basketball's recruiting morass, no one will have an unkind word to say about that.

Posted on: May 18, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: May 18, 2011 1:06 pm
 

Gene Smith supports Jim Tressel

Posted by Tom Fornelli

There are plenty of people out there who don't feel as if Jim Tressel should keep his job at Ohio State following everything that we've learned about the Buckeyes in recent months, myself included. The thing is, no matter how strongly anybody feels about Tressel's job, there are only a couple people who actually have the ability to relieve him of his post. One of those people is Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith, and it doesn't exactly sound like the thought of firing Tressel is something he's considered. 

The Big Ten held its spring meeting on Tuesday in Chicago, and Smith was asked if he still supported his beleaguered head coach.

"Oh, definitely, no question," Smith told Adam Rittenberg. "I haven't changed, I haven't changed. But I'm not talking about the case beyond that."

Tressel also received support from fellow Big Ten head coaches Pat Fitzgerald and Mark Dantonio during the spring meetings, as well as the newest Big Ten athletic director Tom Osborne. In fact, Osborne found no shortage of words when it came to praising his old friend.

"I don't really know enough about [Ohio State's situation]," Osborne said. "I do know Jim Tressel, and I believe that Jim's an honorable person. There will be those who will criticize me for saying that, but I think I know Jim's character. What happened, I don't know a lot about the details. I certainly hope for his sake that things turn out OK, and for Ohio State."

It seems pretty obvious at this point that if things don't turn out all right for Jim Tressel, it won't be because Ohio State decided to punish him.
Posted on: April 23, 2011 8:30 pm
Edited on: April 23, 2011 8:31 pm
 

Bo Pelini has a new contract

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Nebraska will be making the move to the Big Ten in 2011, and it looks like head coach Bo Pelini will be making the move with a brand new contract. According to the Lincoln Journal Star, Pelini is now working under a new deal that begain on March 1. While the new contract only adds one year to the deal Pelini had been coaching under it also sees Pelini getting a bump in pay.

In fact, with the new raise, Pelini will now be the third-highest paid head coach in the Big Ten, trailing only Ohio State's Jim Tressel and Iowa's Kirk Ferentz.

Under terms of a deal that became effective March 1, the fourth-year Nebraska head coach's annual base salary increased to $2.775 million, a raise of $425,000 from his 2010 contract. Under the new five-year deal, Pelini's base salary will escalate $100,000 annually, reaching $3.175 million in 2015.

The length of Pelini's contract was extended one year, and his performance bonuses increased significantly. The new deal also more than doubles the amount NU would owe Pelini if he is fired.

Pelini also had a clause removed from his former contract that would have seen him receive a $500,000 bonus should he still be coaching the team in 2015. Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne pointed out that due to a new law, schools can no longer give head coaches bonuses based on a team's academic performance. So Osborne said that the new deal makes up for the income lost there, and that Nebraska also just wanted to reward Pelini for the job he's done since taking over the program.

Pelini can also earn performance bonuses for winning the Legends Division without appearing in the Big 10 title game ($100,000), reaching the Big 10 Championship Game ($200,000), or winning the title game ($350,000). Should Nebraska reach the BCS title game, Pelini would get a $350,000 bonus, but that would go up to $650,000 if Nebraska won the BCS title game.

If that's not enough, Pelini also gets use of a private jet for 16 hours a year for personal travel.

If Pelini is fired before the contract ends, he'll get $1.8 million annually for the remainder of the deal.

Posted on: January 26, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Nebraska ends merchandise deal with Martinez

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Nebraska had a license deal with a merchandising company called Corn Fed Apparel that is owned by Casey Martinez. The same Casey Martinez that happens to be the father of Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez. While the agreement between the Martinez's and Nebraska didn't exactly make either side rich, the fact that the school had struck a deal with the father of its starting quarterback did strike some as fishy. Which is why instead of dealing with any possible headaches over nothing, both Nebraska and Martinez decided it was best to just end the relationship.

Here's the release from athletic director Tom Osborne:

“The licensing relationship with Corn Fed began in the summer of 2007 before our football program had initiated any recruiting contact with Taylor and his family, or had any knowledge of Taylor as a prospective student-athlete. Corn Fed is a solid company which has demonstrated success in the apparel business, and has been a licensee not only of Nebraska, but several other schools around the country. There is nothing in the licensing agreement between the two parties that is in any way non-compliant with NCAA rules.

“We have recently learned that while Taylor Martinez has no ownership in Corn Fed Apparel, Inc., he is registered as the owner of the Corn Fed trademark, and also the CornFed.com domain name. Again, this arrangement does not violate any NCAA rules.

“However, because of the attention this agreement has caused, Casey Martinez recently initiated a conversation with Nebraska about ending the licensing relationship. Both parties agreed that it would be prudent to no longer have a licensing relationship between the University of Nebraska and Corn Fed. Both the Martinez family and the University of Nebraska feel this decision is best for all parties, and specifically in helping limit distractions for Taylor and the football program.”

How much money did Nebraska make off of this deal? Well, while we can't be entirely sure of the numbers, according to an article in the Omaha World Herald in December, Nebraska has made a whopping $500 from the deal since it was reached four years ago. So I suppose we can call off the dime-sniffing dogs.
 
 
 
 
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