Tag:Big Ten
Posted on: December 13, 2011 8:21 pm
Edited on: December 13, 2011 8:21 pm
 

Michigan unveils new uniforms for Sugar Bowl

Posted by Adam Jacobi

In the Big Ten, there's no more tradition-obsessed (read: change-averse) football program than Michigan. where fans react with consternation toward things most programs take for granted: luxury boxes, piped-in music, and uniform changes, for some examples.

So it must have been some sort of comfort when adidas unveiled its alternate home uniforms for Michigan against Notre Dame in the second week of the season, and the uniforms were still quite obviously Michigan uniforms at first glance -- unlike, say, the Georgia Pro Combat uniform. Notre Dame, also an adidas school, wore a uniform that was also quintessentially its own in that game. Hey, there's something to be said for familiarity.

Similarly, Michigan fans must have been relieved to see that the team's alternate road uniforms it's busting out for the 2012 Sugar Bowl against Virginia Tech are, again, quite obviously Michigan uniforms. The "new" threads, seen at right and courtesy of the Michigan athletic department on WhoSay.com, were the result of teamwork between adidas and the football players themselves.

“We met with our seniors and showed them some concepts that were proposed by adidas and the mock-up is what they chose,” said Michigan coach Brady Hoke in a special news release. “This is a something the players enjoy and we thought it would be a nice way to commemorate our appearance in the Sugar Bowl.”

In addition, according to Michigan, the players decided to wear the grey face mask on the famed winged helmet. Player numbers will also continue to appear on the helmet.

The uniform is being modeled by a computer simulation of UNIDENTIFIED RANDOM STUDENT-ATHLETE NUMBER 16, and is in no way meant to be thought of as anything resembling Denard Robinson

Virginia Tech will not be wearing a special uniform for the game.

Anyway, kudos to adidas for again opting not to engage in the excesses of other companies' alternate uniforms (take a look at Ohio State's scarlet mess from this year and tell me, I dare you to tell me Nike didn't only give them to OSU because Rutgers passed on them first) and sticking to the same colors and relatively similar color proportions as usual. If it ain't broke, don't fix it, sure, but a little tweak never hurt anybody either.

We did, however, wonder what would happen if, like most of its other uniform providers, adidas had absolutely no regard for tradition and instead went for the flashiest design possible. We have obtained an EXCLUSIVE ALTERNATE UNIVERSE SNEAK PEEK at exactly that scenario, and we're happy to share it with you here. Enjoy:

  • First of all, the cumbersome title Wolverines has been shortened to the much more economical and efficient "'Rines," much in the same way that Miami has come to be known as "the 'Canes" or Boise State is now referred to simply as "the 'Cos."
  • Second, the winged helmet has given way to the winged shoulders, which seems more in line with the way animals fly anyway (Can you imagine if birds' wings were on their heads? Ridiculous!).
  • The colors are more eye-catching than before, and that's always a plus, right?
  • And lastly, according to the uniform patch, Michigan would be in the Pac-12. Yeah, conference realignment got weird in this alternate universe.


Anyway, feel free to show that version of the Michigan uniform to any Wolverine fan if you want to give them an aneurysm. 

Posted on: December 13, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Roundtable: Highlights, lowlights of bowl season

Posted by Eye on College Football



Occasionally the Eye on CFB team gathers, Voltron-style, to answer a pressing question from the world of college football. Today's question is:

What game are you most excited to watch this bowl season? Which game would you rather repair a leaky faucet than be forced to watch? And what under-the-radar bowl do you think will prove surprisingly enjoyable?

Tom Fornelli: There's three games that stand out to me as must-watches. The Fiesta and Rose Bowls present a couple of interesting matchups--a battle between Andrew Luck and Brandon Weeden should be a good time, and in the Rose we have two drastically different approaches to the run game. It's a classic Speed vs Strength showdown we see a lot when the Big Ten is involved.

Then there's the Alamo Bowl and what could be our last chance to see RG3 play in a Baylor uniform. Plus a game between Baylor and Washingtonshould give us plenty of points.
When it comes to games I'd like to avoid like the plague, I have to go with the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl. Two 6-win teams playing under interim head coaches? HOO BOY. Gotta get some of that! As for the game most people probably don't care about, but could make for a very entertaining four hours, I have to go with the next-to-last game of the season: The GoDaddy.com Bowl between Arkansas State and Northern Illinois. Not exactly a glamourous matchup, but a matchup that could feature so many points and big plays, and it's likely going to come down to who has the ball last. It'll be a great way to get my last offensive fix of the season before tuning in to see LSU and Alabama trade punts.

Bryan FischerEven though it's not on New Year's Day this year, no game gets me excited like the Rose Bowl does. The pageantry, the setting, and -- of course -- the game itself are just fantastic. This year in particular is a very interesting matchup, the speed and quickness of Oregon against the smash-mouth sytle of Wisconsin. Both have something to prove: the Ducks need to win a BCS game under Chip Kelly and the Badgers are looking to forget last year's loss. It should be another great BCS game out in Pasadena.

At the complete opposite end of the scale is the Little Caesars Bowl. Detroit in the middle of winter with a 6-6 Purdue team and 7-5 Western Michigan team is not exactly glamorous. If you want an example of why we have too many bowls, this is it. The blandness of the game would be too much for anybody to sit through if there weren't a MAC team involved. The Interim Head Coach Bo... excuse me, the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl isn't must-watch either.

I feel like a lot of people are overlooking the Outback Bowl this year. Michigan State was thisclose to getting to the Rose Bowl and winning the Big Ten title, but now head out to Florida with so much attention on rival Michigan and newcomer Urban Meyer that everybody has forgotten the Spartans won 10 games this year. Likewise, Georgia ran off 10 straight during the season and are looking to end on a high note after last year's ugly bowl loss. Of the BCS games, I can't wait to see Andrew Luck go against the opportunistic Oklahoma State defense.

Adam JacobiCo-signed on the MSU-Georgia game; I think that's going to be outstanding. One game that completely underwhelms me is Texas-Cal in the Holiday Bowl. I preferred the days of yore, when the Holiday matched up a defense-optional WAC team (usually BYU) against a Big Ten or Big 8/12 team and let the sparks fly. I don't see sparks with Texas or Cal, I see an interminable slog. In fact, the closest thing we've got to an old-fashioned Holiday Bowl is the TicketCity Bowl, which pits pass-crazed Houston and Case Keenum against Penn State's ferocious defense. All year long, fans have groused that Houston wouldn't be able to replicate its aerial assault against a "real" defense, and Ds don't get much realer than Penn State, which has talent up and down the lineup and depth. Of course, with PSU's spotty offense, 20 points might be all the Cougars need to score to secure a win, but even that's not a guarantee. Should be interesting to watch. In terms of fan experiences, Iowa State's Pinstripe Bowl visit to Yankee Stadium to take on Rutgers -- the closest thing to a "home team" possible in NYC -- should be beyond cool. In terms of actual football, it's probably going to be a horror show. Pass.

Chip PattersonThe first attempt at football in new Yankee Stadium was both a dream and nightmare at the same time.  The awkwardly aligned field and another in-state Big East team should make for a unique environment, but the inaugural Pinstripe Bowl will be remembered for the infamous excessive celebration penalty on the final touchdown that likely cost Kansas State a shot at overtime.  Throw two wildly unpredictable teams like Rutgers and Iowa State on the diamond, and who knows what will happen; it might not be that bad.

So in addition to the Kraft Hunger Bowl, I'll pile on with the Independence Bowl as lacking some flavor, because both teams are looking towards the future.  Missouri finished the season with three straight wins to become bowl eligible, but are on their way to the SEC and will be without star running back Henry Josey thanks to a freak knee injury.  Everett Withers will be coaching North Carolina for this one game, but with Larry Fedora already hired as the next head coach there leaves very little inspiration for the Tar Heels' staff to make this a game to build on for the future.  I could be wrong, but the Tar Heels did not show a ton of fight down the stretch, losing four of their final six games.

On the positive side, I'm looking forward to seeing Dabo Swinney and Dana Holgorsen making their first BCS bowl appearances as head coaches, and the showdown of high-octane styles should make for some fireworks in South Beach. The Rose and Cotton Bowls both seem like very intriguing on-field matchups, and I'm setting two DVR's to catch Luck and Weeden dueling in the desert. But I would rather watch the entire Big East regular season on loop for 2 days straight than watch Pittsburgh and SMU in the BBVA Compass Bowl.  Pitt blatantly tried to get out of the bowl and June Jones is fresh off an embarrassing flirtation with Arizona State. No thank you, BBVA Compass. I'll put my money elsewhere. 

Jerry HinnenIt's not surprising that precious few college football fans outside of Tuscaloosa and Baton Rouge seem all that pumped for a rematch of a touchdown-free 9-6 slugfest that (save for the Bryant-Denny atmosphere) played more like a lower-rung NFL game -- in its inferior second half, anyway -- than a battle between two of the best SEC teams of the past decade. If I'd had a vote, I'd have cast it for Oklahoma State, too. 

But I'm still more excited for Tide-Tigers II than any other game on the bowl slate, because this LSU team is maybe the most compelling, fascinating college football team I can remember watching. They produce fewer yards per-game than 74 other teams in the FBS (including such non-must-see attacks as UCLA's and Virginia's), but they still make for riveting viewing because of the anything-can-happen-at-anytime nature of their games. There's Tyrann Mathieu's game-swinging plays, the terror of Mingo and Montgomery off the edge, Jordan Jefferson's capacity to win or lose any game near-singlehandedly, the phenomenon that is Brad Wing and -- oh yeah -- the mad in-game tactics of Les Freaking Miles. And now this bizarre bayou witch's brew of a team takes on its deadliest rival, again, with the opportunity to become not just national champions but -- given their domination of the SEC, nonconference gauntlet, and potential twin victories over Nick Saban's best Alabama team -- one of the game's greatest champions of the past 25 years. Whether it's the "right" title game matchup or not won't make it any less historic, or thrilling.

As for which game I'm least enthused about, at least Bruins-Illini has Nelson Rosario and Whitney Mercilus going for it. Louisville-N.C. State in the Belk Bowl seems like the most average possible matchup between the most average possible teams in the most average possible BCS leagues; I figure I'll need to average a cup of coffee per quarter to make it to the end. (At least, if Victor Anderson doesn't save me). As for an under-the-radar special, Vanderbilt and Cincinnati both come into the Liberty Bowl with plenty to prove, exciting (and balanced) offenses, and one of the hotter young coaches in the game. Show me two evenly-matched up-and-coming teams at programs where bowl wins are still worth their metaphorical weight in gold, and I'll show you what should be an outstanding contest.
Posted on: December 12, 2011 5:09 pm
 

Pro Football Weekly releases All-American team

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

And now for something not quite completely different, but almost: the Pro Football Weekly All-American team.

As you might expect, the criteria for making an NFL-driven media outlet's All-America team differs dramatically from making most others. In its statement announcing the team, the PFW writes that:

The team annually honors the most talented players in college football and is selected based on considerable feedback from NFL evaluators taking into consideration a player’s pure talent and contribution to his team. Unlike many other teams rewarding the best college football players, PFW places an extra premium on true talent and draft value in the selection process. However, participants are expected to have contributed for the bulk of the season, leaving off some talented prospects who were limited this season. Extra attention was paid to qualities such as toughness, competitiveness and work ethic.

The team:
Quarterback

Andrew Luck, Stanford
HONORABLE MENTION: Matt Barkley, USC, Robert Griffin III, Baylor

Running back

Trent Richardson, Alabama
HM: Montee Ball, Wisconsin, David Wilson, Virginia Tech

Fullback

Jay Prosch, Illinois
HM: Braden Wilson, Kansas State

Wide receivers

Sammy Watkins, Clemson
Kendall Wright, Baylor
HM: Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State, Michael Floyd, Notre Dame, Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina, Marvin McNutt, Iowa

Tight end

Coby Fleener, Stanford
HM: Tyler Eifert, Notre Dame, Dwayne Allen, Clemson

Offensive tackles

Matt Kalil, USC
Riley Reiff, Iowa
HM: Barrett Jones, Alabama, Taylor Lewan, Michigan, Zebrie Sanders, Florida State, Cordy Glenn, Georgia

Offensive guards

David DeCastro, Stanford
Kevin Zeitler, Wisconsin
HM: Chance Warmack, Alabama, Alvin Bailey, Arkansas

Center

Peter Konz, Wisconsin
HM: David Molk, Michigan, Ben Jones, Georgia

Defensive Ends

Sam Montgomery, LSU
Melvin Ingram, South Carolina
HM: Whitney Mercilus, Illinois, Barkevious Mingo, LSU, Vinny Curry, Marshall, Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma

Defensive tackles

Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State
Devon Still, Penn State
HM: Michael Brockers, LSU, Brandon Thompson, Clemson, Josh Chapman, Alabama, Dontari Poe, Memphis

Inside linebacker

Dont’a Hightower, Alabama
HM: Luke Kuechly, Boston College, Lavonte David, Nebraska

Outside linebackers

Courtney Upshaw, Alabama
Jarvis Jones, Georgia
HM: Gerald Hodges, Penn State, Sean Spence, Miami (Fla.)

Cornerbacks

Morris Claiborne, LSU
Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama
HM: Tyrann Mathieu, LSU, Brodrick Brown, Oklahoma State, Leonard Johnson, Iowa State, David Amerson, North Carolina State

Safeties

Mark Barron, Alabama
T.J. McDonald, USC
HM: Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State, Bacarri Rambo, Georgia, Tony Jefferson, Oklahoma, John Boyett, Oregon

Placekicker

Randy Bullock, Texas A&M
HM: Caleb Sturgis, Florida

Punter

Steven Clark, Auburn
HM: Brad Wing, LSU

Return specialist

Joe Adams, Arkansas
HM: Taveon Rogers, New Mexico State
A few comments:

S-E-C! S-E-C! (D-E-F-E-N-S-E). Certainly the pro scouts don't think the SEC's reputation for defense is overblown; only two of their 11 first-team defenders hail from any other conference. They would also tend to lean towards Alabama over LSU when it comes to naming the nation's most talented defense; four Tide defenders make the first team to LSU's two, though three Tigers do make honorable mention (to the Tide's one).

But not offensively. Of course, the opposite is true on the other side of the ball, where Trent Richardson is the SEC's only first-team representative. Perhaps most surprising is that the league's offensive linemen are given such short shrift; instead four of the five first-team OLs hail from the Big Ten, including a pair from Wisconsin.

Sammy power.
Only two freshmen made the team at all, and only one landed on the first team: Clemson receiver Sammy Watkins, who doesn't boast prototypical NFL wideout size but has nonetheless clearly caught the eyes of the pro scouts.

Did the Ray Guy get that right? No. But maybe the award's decision to include Auburn sophomore punter Steven Clark over LSU's Brad Wing (the other freshman honoree) as one of three finalists makes a little more sense given that the pros favor Clark's towering moonshots over Wing's, well, better all-around productivity/statistics.

Major notoriety for mid-major players. Marshall's Vinny Curry has gotten some press, but you won't see many other All-American teams with players from Memphis and New Mexico State honored, we don't think. We'll take the scouts' word for it on Tiger tackle Dontari Poe and Aggie returner Taveon Rogers; congrats to them.
Posted on: December 12, 2011 3:32 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 3:35 pm
 

Bowl Game Picks: Who Do You Like?

Posted by Chip Patterson

Every week the CBSSports.com college football staff offers our picks straight up and against the spread in the Expert Picks. But we aren't the only ones who get to offer our opinions on the outcome of the weekend's best games. In our weekly "Who Do You Like" Picks, we give you - the readers - a chance to weigh in on how you think the upcoming slate of games will play out.

After getitng your opinion on the BCS bowls last week, we move our attention to some of the high-profile non-BCS bowls in the weeks ahead.  Let us know how you think these cross-conference showdowns will play out in the days leading up to the National Championship Game.       

You can see the results of the voting every Tuesday night at 8 p.m. on Inside College Football, airing on the CBS Sports Network.



Come debate your picks for the week with other college football fans at the new Eye On College Football Facebook page. 

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: December 12, 2011 2:19 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 2:20 pm
 

UCLA withholds checks after missed workouts

Posted by Adam Jacobi

UCLA is gearing up for a bowl date against Illinois in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl, a game set for New Year's Eve. And although UCLA and Illinois shouldn't be imbued with a heightened awareness of fighting hunger by the invitation any more than Texas A&M and Northwestern should be considered auto repair enthusiasts by dint of appearing in the Maaco Car Care Bowl, there is still no shortage of irony that UCLA is apparently causing hunger in some of its own football players this month.

Here's how the Los Angeles Times reported this story:

Some UCLA football players and members of the coaching staff were at odds Sunday after bowl game checks meant to help with living expenses were withheld. 

Some players did not receive checks for failing to attend what they called voluntary workouts during finals week, according to one parent who asked not to be identified because it could affect his son. Players said they use the money to buy food, as university services are shut down after the quarter ends.

UCLA spokesperson Nick Ammazzalorso said the players had been notified in advance that the checks would be withheld, and that the players in question had also not filled out academic paperwork. The crux of the matter, however, appears to be that the coaching staff and players disagreed on whether the workouts during finals week were mandatory or not, and that the consequence of missing a finals week practice was to withhold necessary living expenses.

As for how well-needed these checks were, the coaches eventually issued the checks after realizing that not doing so would cause financial hardship -- yes, that required a realization -- but not before two Bruins took to Twitter to complain about their hunger.

"We are being held from our checks because we chose not to participate in voluntary workouts," defensive back Randall Carroll wrote on Twitter. "Honestly, [I] don't know how I'm going to eat these few days."

Linebacker Aramide Olaniyan also posted on Twitter account, saying in part "My stomach [is] growling tonight."

This story's far from over at this point; UCLA should probably make a clarification on whether the workouts in question were in fact mandatory, and a statement from the NCAA on whether UCLA's initial handling of the situation was appropriate in the NCAA's eyes. Perhaps it was, and perhaps all bowl teams are operating under similar guidelines. Now would be the time to make that clear, though, because if all fans have is this account of the UCLA program, it's hard not to come to the conclusion that something is dreadfully awry in the way athletes in need are treated.

Now, if that seems like an exaggeration, consider that had Olaniyan or Carroll gotten a free meal from a sympathetic restaurateur who didn't want to see the two young men go hungry, that would be an impermissible benefit and would likely cost the two players their eligibility for at least the upcoming bowl game. Choosing between eligibility and dinner seems like an awfully heavy consequence of missing a workout and/or not filling out a minor piece of paperwork, does it not?

Posted on: December 11, 2011 6:34 pm
Edited on: December 11, 2011 9:46 pm
 

Iowa DC Norm Parker retires after 44-year career

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Kirk Ferentz is the most tenured coach in the Big Team, and as long as he's been the head coach at Iowa, he's had Norm Parker as his defensive coordinator. Until now. On Sunday, Iowa announced that Parker, 68, would retire after the Insight Bowl, where the Hawkeyes are set to face Oklahoma.

"I would like to announce that the 2011 Insight Bowl will be my last game as a football coach at Iowa," said Parker in a statement released Sunday. "I would like to personally thank [Iowa athletic director] Gary Barta, Kirk Ferentz, the coaches, and players at Iowa, along with the fantastic fans. The entire Hawkeye community has been great. My wife Linda, and all the members of our family, were very pleased to be members of the Hawkeye family."

Parker's career as an assistant coach in the NCAA dates all the way back to 1968, when he was an offensive line coach for Eastern Michigan. Parker switched to the defensive side of the ball as a defensive line coach with Minnesota in 1972, and he's been a linebackers coach and/or defensive coordinator for the last 34 years with stops in Illinois, East Carolina, Michigan State, Vanderbilt, and finally Iowa. 

"Norm's contributions to our team the past 13 years are deeply appreciated, as he has had a tremendous impact on our program," said Ferentz on Sunday. "Norm is a superb defensive coach and has served as a strong role model and mentor for all of our players and our entire staff." 

Parker's health has been declining for the past few years, and in 2010 complications from diabetes forced doctors to amputate Parker's right leg below the knee. Parker was fitted with a prosthesis, and he coached games this year from the press box while using a golf cart to get around at practices.

The one aspect of Parker's defenses that he's best known for is a steadfast trust in his base 4-3 defense, and a blitz call was about as rare as a mooing steak in Iowa City. Still, the Hawkeyes were almost always in the Top 20 in total defense under Parker, and this year's mediocre numbers (eighth in the Big Ten in both total defense and scoring defense) were highly anomolous. And yet, Parker was still named the Assistant Coach of the Year by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) after this season, and will be honored in January at the AFCA's annual convention.

Iowa has not hired a replacement for Parker yet, nor is it known whether the Hawkeyes will seek an outside candidate or promote a defensive coordinator from within, such as longtime Ferentz assistant Phil Parker. Kirk Ferentz has never had to replace a coordinator at Iowa (his OC, Ken O'Keefe, has also been in that role since Day 1), so there's no precedent from which one might glean an idea of what Ferentz will do here. Mike Stoops, the former Arizona head coach and Oklahoma defensive coordinator, is still available; Stoops played football at Iowa and was an assistant there for five years under Hayden Fry.

No timetable has been announced for the hiring of Parker's successor.
Posted on: December 11, 2011 11:48 am
Edited on: December 11, 2011 11:55 am
 

2nd version of McQueary 2002 account goes public

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The Harrisburg Patriot-News reported Sunday that the grand jury in the Jerry Sandusky case has heard a second, different version of what Penn State then-graduate assistant Mike McQueary witnessed in his 2002 encounter with Sandusky and a young boy in a PSU locker room.

McQueary has reportedly told the grand jury that he saw Sandusky and the boy engaged in a graphic sex act. But according to a source quoted in the Sunday Patriot-News report, the grand jury has also heard conflicting testimony from McQueary family friend Dr. Jonathan Dranov.  Per the source's account of Dranov's testimony, Dranov was present at the McQueary home when McQueary returned from the incident to discuss it with his father.

Dranov reportedly told the grand jury that McQueary's account that evening included seeing the boy and an adult sharing a shower stall and Sandusky leaving the showers (amongst other details), but not the graphic act of his earlier reported testimony. Dranov then advised McQueary to discuss the matter with Joe Paterno rather than go to the police, according to the Patriot-News source.

The precise nature of what McQueary told Paterno in their ensuing discussion has been the center of much of the outrage surrounding Paterno's and the PSU administration's inaction.

McQueary was placed on administrative leave from his coaching duties November 11 amidst threats to his safety.
Posted on: December 10, 2011 9:44 pm
 

2011 Heisman Trophy voting numbers breakdown



Posted by Adam Jacobi

On Saturday night, the Heisman Trophy was awarded to Baylor junior quarterback Robert Griffin III. RG3, as he's known to Baylor faithful and now the rest of the nation, collected 405 first-place votes to finish with 1,687 total voting points, well ahead of the runner-up, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. Luck had 247 first-place votes and 1,407 total voting points.

The key to Griffin's victory in the voting was his performance in the South region -- Alabama RB Trent Richardson's home territory -- where RG3 led all contenders with 303 voting points. Richardson was second with 256 points there, and Luck was third with 182 points. That region alone accounted for nearly half of Griffin's margin of victory over Luck, and it helped stave Richardson off as a serious threat to winning the Heisman. Of course, Griffin also cleaned up in his home Southwest region, but it was his ability to win regions that he wasn't the home favorite of that landed RG3 the coveted Heisman.

Here's the final national vote ranking:

  1. Robert Griffin III, Baylor QB: 405 first-place votes, 1,687 total points
  2. Andrew Luck, Stanford QB: 247 first-place votes, 1,407 total points
  3. Trent Richardson, Alabama RB: 138 first-place votes, 978 total points
  4. Montee Ball, Wisconsin RB: 22 first-place votes, 348 total points
  5. Tyrann Mathieu, LSU DB: 34 first-place votes, 327 total points
  6. Matt Barkley, USC QB: 11 first-place votes, 153 total points
  7. Case Keenum, Houston QB: 10 first-place votes, 123 total points
  8. Kellen Moore, Boise State QB: 6 first-place votes, 90 total points
  9. Russell Wilson, Wisconsin QB: 4 first-place votes, 52 total points
  10. LaMichael James, Oregon RB: 5 first-place votes, 48 total points

And here are the regional breakdowns:

FAR WEST (Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

  1. Luck: 315 points
  2. Griffin: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 137 points

MID-ATLANTIC (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia)

  1. Griffin: 254 points
  2. Luck: 248 points
  3. Richardson: 168 points

MIDWEST (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin)

  1. Griffin: 272 points
  2. Luck: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 125 points

NORTHEAST (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont)

  1. Griffin: 257 points
  2. Luck: 254 points
  3. Richardson: 160 points 

SOUTH (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee) 

  1. Griffin: 303 points
  2. Richardson: 256 points
  3. Luck: 182 points

SOUTHWEST (Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas)

  1. Griffin: 381 points
  2. Luck: 188 points
  3. Richardson: 132 points
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com