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Category:NCAAF
Posted on: February 7, 2012 9:27 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 9:31 pm
 

USC WR coach Gilmore headed to Oakland

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Just a few days after losing linebackers coach Joe Barry to the NFL, USC is down another staff member after wide receiver Ted Gilmore accepted the same position with the Oakland Raiders, a source told CBSSports.com.

Gilmore, 44, came to USC just a year ago from Nebraska, where he spent six years coaching receivers and four holding the role of recruiting coordinator.

A Wichita, Kansas native, Gilmore played his college ball at Wyoming before starting his coaching career as a graduate assistant there. He also had stops at Kansas, Houston, Purdue and Colorado before his stint at Nebraksa.

Under Gilmore, USC's receiving corps had a breakout year in 2011. Sophomore Robert Woods developed into a Biletnikoff Award finalist and teammate Marqise Lee was named a Freshman All-American. Whoever takes Gilmore's spot will not only have those two to work with but former prep All-American George Farmer and incoming five-star athlete Nelson Agholor.

Head coach Lane Kiffin, in addition to Gilmore and Barry's spots, is also looking for a defensive backs coach. The Trojans' Spring practice starts in just four weeks as the team likely heads into 2012 as a pre-season top two team.

The Raiders are becoming familiar with poaching Pac-12 assistants having hired former Stanford defensive coordinator Jason Tarver on Monday.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 7:22 pm
 

Iowa's Phil Parker promoted to D-coordinator

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Under Kirk Ferentz, Iowa has enjoyed one of the most stable, most continuity-heavy coaching staffs in the country. So it wasn't a surprise Tuesday when Ferentz announced he had promoted one of his own to the Hawkeyes' vacant defensive coordinator position.

That coach is Phil Parker, the Hawkeyes' secondary coach for the past 13 seasons. Parker will replace Norm Parker (no relation), who retired following the 2011 season after 12 years as the Iowa DC. The two Parkers served as co-defensive coordinators in 2010 as Norm battled diabetes complications.

As part of Phil's promotion, offensive line coach Reese Morgan will switch to coaching the defensive line, while linebackers coach Darrell Wilson will take over Parker's duties with the defensive backs. Morgan has been with the Hawkeye staff for the past 12 seasons, and Wilson for the past 10.

"Phil, Darrell and Reese have all done an outstanding job in our program for a significant period of time," Ferentz said in a statement. "I am confident they will have a very positive effect on our team as we transition forward."

While Parker will have to prove his worth as a full-time coordinator, there's not much doubting his resume as a secondary coach; the Hawkeyes have produced multiple All-Big Ten and even All-American defensive backs on his watch, including Tyler Sash, Amari Spievey and Shaun Prater, and put together back-to-back national top-five finishes in opponent's passer rating in 2008 and 2009.

So Parker's promotion may not have the buzziest, sexiest decision from a coaching perspective, but if it yields the same defensive results the Hawkeyes have enjoyed since Ferentz's arrival -- and   there's little reason to think it won't -- it should prove effective all the same.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 5:24 pm
 

State rep. wants Gamecocks-Tigers required by law

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

With every signal coming out of SEC HQ indicating the league is highly unlikely to follow the ACC's lead and pursue a nine-game league schedule, the 116-year intra-state rivalry between South Carolina and Clemson isn't in any immediate danger of being interrupted by the league's recent expansions. But one Palmetto State legislator has decided he'd rather not take any chances.

South Carolina state representative Nathan Ballentine has proposed that state law require the Gamecocks and Tigers to meet each year on the gridiron, continuing the nation's second-longest continuously played college football rivalry. The proposal will be examined by House lawmakers Wednesday, the State reports.

"I had a constituent bring it up to me, asking whether it was state law that these two teams play. It's not," said Ballentine, a South Carolina graduate from Lexington, S.C. "With all the conference realignment, we just wanted to make sure this annual game continues ... You saw Texas and Texas A&M ... No one wants to see that happen here to our two universities where families enjoy the annual game, and it's great for our economy."

Remarkably, the series has apparently been saved once already by state congressional fiat--according to Ballentine, no game was scheduled between the two teams in 1952 until the legislature stepped in.

But that's not argument enough for officials at either school, who agreed that the legislature's intervention at this stage is unnecessary. 

"Clemson would prefer to not have to legislate this issue," Tiger athletic director Terry Don Phillips said, "as I cannot conceive of a realistic scenario that would prohibit Clemson and South Carolina from continuing our football series."

Which makes us wonder--was this all a grand plot on Ballentine's part to prove to the two schools that they can agree on something? After the epic war of (misattributed) words between Dabo Swinney and (not actually) Steve Spurrier following this year's Gamecock beatdown, could the two programs have needed the reminder not to travel down the road of public in-fighting and back-biting that poisoned the rivalry between the Aggies and 'Horns?

To answer those questions: no, it wasn't, and no, they didn't. But as college football fans, we can understand Rep. Ballentine wanting to play it safe all the same.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 5:12 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 9:32 pm
 

Mike Leach dismisses linebacker C.J. Mizell

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Mike Leach knows he's got a rebuilding job to do on the Palouse but that doesn't mean team discipline will take a back seat in his quest to lead the program back to glory. The head coach announced on Tuesday that linebacker C.J. Mizell was no longer with the Washington State football team following his arrest over the weekend after his involvement in a fight at a fraternity house.

Mizell started nine games last season as a true freshman and was fourth on the team after racking up 56 tackles and three sacks. Local police say Mizell tried to enter a party at a frat house and was denied entry. He reportedly punched one of the members and fled the scene before later being arrested on misdemeanor charges of assault and trespassing.

The Tallahassee, Fla. native was expected to start this season and be a key contributor for a Cougars defense that has struggled to stop opponents. Leach however, has apparently drawn a line in the sand when it comes to discipline and Mizell was the first to fully understand what it meant.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 2:34 pm
 

Report: ACC expansion to net bump in TV deal

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



The ACC's decision to expand with Pitt and Syracuse has reportedly paid off with a substantial addition to their television contract's bottom line--though if the addition was substantial enough to justify the drawbacks of that expansion may be debatable.

The Sports Business Journal reported Monday that in the wake of the addition of the Panthers and Orangethe ACC has been able to "reopen" its recently signed contract with ESPN and negotiate a $1 million to $2 million annual increase for each of its now 14 member schools. Under the revised contract, each ACC member "can expect at least $14 million to $15 million a year," an increase from the current $13 million. The overall value of the contract is expected to increase from $155 million per season to north of $200 million.

The increase would bring the ACC nearly on par in annual distribution revenue with the Big 12, which the SBJ estimates currently averages $15 million per school, with the SEC at $17 million and the Big Ten and Pac-12 at $21 million.

But those figures illustrate why the ACC's expansion may not have provided enough buck for its bang. All four of those leagues should see their TV revenues increase in the near future, the Big 12 and SEC through their own expansion-induced negotiations and the Big Ten and Pac-12 through growing profits from their in-house networks. When the dust from the current round of expansion settles, the ACC is likely to still trail four of the five other BCS conferences (though they may have pulled closer to the Big 12, depending on how that league's negotiations go).

There's other downsides to the expansion, too. For one, the revised contract reportedly won't kick in until Syracuse and Pitt become active members of the league, which may not take place until 2014-2015 and certainly won't be in 2012-2013. In exchange for the boost to the contract, ESPN is also expected to exact a not-insignificant price: a three-year extension of what was already a 12-year deal, meaning the ACC won't be able to enter a full contract negotiation until 2026. (If the Big Ten and Pac-12 networks continue at their expected rates of growth, how wide will the gap be between those conferences and the ACC 14 years from now?) 

And though a potential $2 million per season is certainly nothing to sneeze at, shuttling not just the football team but volleyball, baseball, tennis (etc.) teams to West Pennsylvania and upstate New York on an annual basis will add to the travel budget. Then there's the fewer games between traditional ACC rivals in both football and basketball (though the nine-game gridiron schedule will help) and increased difficulty for any individual team to earn a championship ... all for a financial windfall that at Clemson equals not much more than a single assistant coach.

Is it worth it? Given that the ACC couldn't really stand pat as those other four BCS leagues pushed the financial gap even wider, John Swofford and Co. probably didn't have any choice. But the first time we watch Georgia Tech play at Heinz Field instead of Death Valley or the Orange disrupt what would have been a Duke-North Carolina ACC Tournament final, we're going to wonder.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 1:53 pm
 

Ohio St.'s Gee to Bielema: 'Get a life'

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

From calling mid-majors the "Little Sisters of the Poor" to asking Jim Tressel not to fire himOhio State president Gordon Gee has not exactly been one to keep his mouth out of the headlines over the past 12 months. And he may not be for the next 12 months, either, judging by this interview with OSU student newspaper The Lanternin which he tells Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema to "get a life."

Bielema infamously accused new Buckeye head coach Urban Meyer of using "illegal" recruiting "tactics" and asked Badger athletic director Barry Alvarez to voice his complaints to Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany on his behalf. Gee emphatically stood up for Meyer in the Lantern interview, calling him the "finest in the country" and "the greatest affirmation of the quality of this institution."

When asked directly about Bielema's comments, Gee was every bit as emphatic.

"We hired the best coach and we went out and got the best kids so get a life," Gee said.

Ah, Signing Day: that magical time of the college football calendar that can lead the president of the third-largest university in the country to publicly call out a coach within his own conference using an insult from a 36-year-old Saturday Night Live sketch.

Gee also referred to the NCAA investigation into Tressel and the Buckeye football program that resulted in its 2012 bowl ban as a "yearlong colonoscopy."

We now fervently await Gee's next pledge to cease discussing matters related to football.

HT: MGoBlog. 

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 1:14 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 1:15 pm
 

Army hero Daniel Rodriguez's football dream

Posted by Chip Patterson

On National Signing Day, hundreds of aspiring college football players signed letters of intent to accept scholarships and attend FBS universities. Players come from all different kinds of backgrounds, but all have the same dream of suiting up in a Division I football game. 24-year-old Daniel Rodriguez shares that dream, but few can relate to his remarkable story.

Rodriguez served as an Army infantryman in both Iraq and Afghanistan, including earning a Bronze Star for Valor and a Purple Heart for his heroism in the Battle of Kamdesh - one of the bloodiest battles of the war in Afghanistan.

Upon his return, Rodriguez has worked to achieve a longtime goal and fulfill a promise to a good friend: play college football.

Rodriguez cites that promise to Pfc. Kevin Thomson, who was killed in the Battle of Kamdesh, as one of the inspirations on his quest to play football. He is currently enrolled in community college, striving to meet Division I academic requirements to play football.

Rodriguez, a long-time Hokie fan, has said he wants to play for Virginia Tech.

Rodriguez' story will be told in two parts on Dan Rather Reports, beginning Tuesday night on HDNet. The producer of the profile, T. Sean Herbert, offered an exclusive preview at Yahoo! Sports' The Post Game. I suggest you cruise on over to read Rodriguez's story, which includes descriptions of his heroic acts in the Battle of Kamdesh.  

But if you need more convincing, check out the American hero in action as he trains for the gridiron.



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Posted on: February 7, 2012 10:15 am
Edited on: February 7, 2012 10:22 am
 

Report: Stanford LB Skov charged with DUI

Posted by Chip Patterson

Stanford linebacker Shayne Skov was arrested for driving under the influence on Jan. 29, according to The Stanford Daily, citing a Stanford University Police Department report.

Skov, the Cardinal's leading tackler in 2010 - despite missing the first two games of the season - suffered a season-ending knee injury in the third game of the 2011 season. In regards to the late January arrest, Stanford head coach David Shaw issued a statement to the student newspaper.

"We have an expected standard of excellence and conduct for our football players and Shayne failed to adhere to those standards,” Shaw said Monday in a statement to The Daily through Jim Young, senior assistant athletic director of communications and media relations.

“It’s a matter we are taking very seriously,” Shaw said. “Shayne will be responsible to adhere to any legal responsibilities regarding this event, along with internal ramifications, which will be determined by the program."

Skov was on 2011 preseason watch lists for the Bednarik Award, Nagurski Trophy, and Butkus Award, and earned Pac-12 All-Academic honorable mention in 2011. The senior linebacker is expected to play a significant role in the Stanford defense in 2012.

For more on this story as it develops, follow Cardinal RapidReports.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com