Tag:Big 12
Posted on: February 28, 2012 5:38 pm
Edited on: February 28, 2012 5:40 pm
 

Big 12 announces settlement with TAMU, Missouri

Posted by Chip Patterson

A Big 12 football season without Texas A&M and Missouri began to take shape earlier this month when both the conference and the SEC released their 2012 regular season schedule. The Tigers to the SEC East and the Aggies to the SEC West happened quickly, but the fine print of the transaction required much more work.

On Tuesday, the Big 12 announced their settlement with both schools as they make their official exit in time for the 2012-2013 academic year. Texas A&M and Missouri will no longer be members of the conference effective June 30, 2012. In order to get approval from the Big 12's eight continuing member institutions, some sacrifices needed to be made. For starters, the league will withhold an estimated $12.41 million from the revenues otherwise distributable to each school. You can check out the official wording for Missouri and Texas A&M below:

The Conference will withhold an estimated $12,410,000 from the revenues otherwise distributable to the University. In addition, Missouri agreed that it would waive any claim to any of the benefits received by the Big 12 Conference from its television contract with Fox Sports, scheduled to commence July 1, 2012. Also, Missouri agreed to pay the Big 12 Conference for its share of the actual cost of officiating expenses for 2011-12 athletic year as it has done in previous years, in the approximate amount of $500,000.

Texas A&M's agreement, nearly identical to Missouri's just without the inclusion of the officiating costs.

The Conference will withhold an estimated $12,410,000 from Texas A&M's projected distribution for fiscal year 2012. However, the parties agreed that A&M will receive a portion of the benefit received by the Big 12 Conference from the signing of its television contract with Fox Sports, scheduled to commence July 1, 2012, and certain other concessions.

Big 12 Conference Commissioner Chuck Neinas called both agreements "fair" in their respective releases, and with the final details settled both schools can focus on their future in the SEC.

For all the latest expansion rumors and headlines, check out our Conference Realignment Home.

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Posted on: February 28, 2012 2:06 pm
 

Tuberville named in $1.7M fraud lawsuit

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Texas Tech is in the middle of its third spring practice under Tommy Tuberville. But no matter how well the Red Raiders may be doing on the Lubbock practice fields, it's been a tough month for Tuberville away from football.

A police investigation into Tuberville's wife, Suzanne Tuberville, following the death of an 87-year-old man who was injured in a November accident in which Suzanne was involved only reportedly closed Monday. Tuberville's legal stress isn't going away anytime soon, though: the Huntsville (Ala.) Times reported Tuesday that Tuberville is near the center of a lawsuit alleging more than $1.7 million worth of fraud on the part of Tuberville and his investment partners at the hedge fund TS Capital Partners.

The suit was filed by a collection of seven plaintiffs in U.S. District Court in Montgomery (Ala.) Friday. The Times details some of the allegations against Tuberville and TS Capital co-founder John David Stroud:

The 32-page suit alleges that Tuberville and Stroud mixed their clients' assets with their own, failed to file tax returns, falsified client statements, falsified fund performance reports and "generally disregarded and violated customary practices and procedures followed in the hedge fund and security investments industry."

Several plaintiffs, including at least one former employee of TS Capital, have demanded their money be returned, yet, according to the complaint, none of the money invested has been accounted for. The suit also states that investors listed "have reason to believe that most, and possibly all, of their invested funds have been misappropriated, improperly converted and/or squandered."

The suit lists 16 complaints against Tuberville and Stroud, including "negligence or wantonness," "fraudulent misrepresentation" and "fraudulent suppression."
Tuberville was the subject of a 2009 Birmingham News story which touted him as an "amateur stock guru" and detailed his role within the Auburn-based TS Capital, where he maintained an office between his departure from the Auburn head coaching position and his hire at Tech.

Whatever the results of the suit, it won't keep Tuberville from performing his duties with the Red Raiders, and won't prevent his team from rebounding from their disappointing 5-7 2011 season. But that mark showed how much work there is to be done in Lubbock, and anything that might blur their head coach's focus -- and you would think a $1.7 million lawsuit would do it -- certainly won't be welcome news either for Tuberville or his program.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 2:35 pm
 

VIDEO: Brett McMurphy talks playoff system

Posted by Chip Patterson

CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy and Dennis Dodd have been reporting from the BCS meetings this week in Dallas, as many of the decision-makers in college football debate the best postseason format for the sport.

The 11 conference commissioners, Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, two BCS officials and a BCS attorney have begun discussing the possibility of a plus-one format to determine the BCS National Champion. The current BCS contract ends after the 2013-14 season, allowing for a new format beginning with the 2014 regular season.

On Friday, Brett McMurphy joined Tim Brando to discuss the momentum behind the BCS plus-one format.



For more from Brett on the BCS meetings, check out his blog, McMurphy's Law.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 12:33 pm
Edited on: February 24, 2012 12:39 pm
 

NCAA approves new kickoff rules, other changes

Posted by Chip Patterson

The NCAA announced on Friday the approval of rules changes in college football, including moving the kick off from the 30-yard line to the 35.

While the ball will be kicked from the 35, players on the kicking team can't line up for the play behind the 30-yard line. According to the NCAA, this is intended to limit the running start kicking teams used to have during the play.

Also, touchbacks on free kicks (kickoffs and punts after a safety) will be moved to the 25-yard line instead of the 20. Touchbacks on all other plays will remain at the 20-yard line. According to the Football Rules Committee, this change is meant to encourage more touchbacks from the receiving team.

These changes are a result from examining NCAA data that showed injuries occur more often on kickoffs than in any other phase of the game. By encouraging touchbacks they will limit the amount of times the play is used, especially as higher scoring (see: Big 12) has resulted in more kickoffs.

Another rule change announced Friday could end up affecting games, possibly even more so than the kickoff rules. According to the NCAA, if a player loses his helmet on the play - facemasks and fouls don't count - he must sit out the next play.

Here is the wording from the NCAA release:

Another new rule that goes into effect next season is if a player loses his helmet (other than as the result of a foul by the opponent, such as a facemask), it will be treated like an injury. The player must leave the game and is not allowed to participate for the next play.

Current injury timeout rules guard against using this rule to gain an advantage from stopping the clock. Additionally, if a player loses his helmet, he must not continue to participate in the play, in order to protect him from injury.

If a quarterback or running back loses his helmet late in the fourth quarter of a close game, you can bet coaches will be screaming for flags. Sometimes helmets just pop off, and there could be cases where there is no threat of injury. Regardless, that player must sit out the next play.

Two more adjustments announced on Friday:

The rules panel also approved new wording in the football rules book regarding blocking below the waist. Offensive players in the tackle box at the snap who are not in motion are allowed to block below the waist legally without restriction. All other players are restricted from blocking below the waist with a few exceptions (for example, straight-ahead blocks).

There will also be a new rule prohibiting players from leaping over blockers in an attempt to block a punt. Receiving-team players trying to jump over a shield-blocking scheme has become popular for teams in punt formation. Receiving-team players try to defeat this scheme by rushing into the backfield to block a punt. In some cases, these players are contacted and end up flipping in the air and landing on their head or shoulders.
 
At the core, all of these changes are meant with the intent of improving player safety. As more medical research reveals dangerous aspects of the sport, changes such as these will be necessary to keep football thriving.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 10:59 am
 

Are these the new Mizzou uniforms?

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Simply moving to the SEC isn't enough for Missouri football. Much like when you get a new job, or you're going on a date with a new beau, you find some new clothes to wear. And that's exactly what Missouri seems to be doing.

The school plans on debuting some new jerseys on April 14th, but before it does anything official, it's teasing the fan base a bit. Missouri posted a video of former Missouri wide receiver and current Philadelphia Eagle Jeremy Maclin getting a look at the new jerseys. Well, one Mizzou fan went through the video frame by frame and took as many screengrabs as he could to try and piece things together.

Judging by one of the photos -- a photo that is intentionally left blurry by the school -- it seems that yellow jerseys are definitely in play for the Tigers next season, as well as a new helmet.





If all that isn't enough, how about some tiger stripes?



Again, while there's nothing here that gives a definitive look at what the jerseys are going to look like, if you look at all the different photos available in the video, you can get a pretty good idea of what Missouri will be wearing during its first season in the SEC.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 10:18 am
Edited on: February 24, 2012 3:34 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: TCU



Posted by Tom Fornelli


Spring football is in the air, and with our Spring Practice Primers the Eye On College Football Blog gets you up to speed on what to look for on campuses around the country this spring. Today we look at TCU.

Spring Practice Starts: Saturday, February 25

Spring Game: Thursday, April 5

Three Things To Look For:

1. Replacing the unexpected losses. Like every team, TCU had losses to deal with on both sides of the ball thanks to graduation, but the recent drug bust on campus through a nasty curveball Gary Patterson's way. Now the TCU defense is without three players it was fully expecting to rely on for 2012 in Tanner Brock, D.J. Yendrey and Devin Johnson. One of the biggest stories this spring will be seeing which of the remaining players on the depth chart rise up to take advantage of an unexpected opportunity.

2. Fixing the secondary. From 2008 to 2010 TCU finished as one of the top 5 defenses in the nation in defensive pass efficiency under coach Chad Glasgow. In 2011 Glasgow left to run the defense at Texas Tech and the Horned Frogs saw their pass defense drop to 65th in the nation. Now Glasgow has returned to his old position, and will look to restore the TCU pass defense to what it was when he was last there. And it couldn't come at a better time for TCU, as you might have noticed that the Big 12 is a conference that enjoys airing it out. 

3. How good can this offense be? TCU's offense finished 9th in the country with 40.8 points per game last season, and while its level of competition may be a touch higher this season, the Big 12 isn't exactly known for smothering defense. With Casey Pachall returning at quarterback, along with his top three receivers from 2010, and it's safe to say that the Horned Frogs passing attack may be terrifying in 2012. Oh, and if it isn't, TCU also has three running backs who rushed for over 700 yards last season returning as well. This could be one of the best offenses in the conference in 2012, and the first signs will be seen this spring.

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 5:08 pm
Edited on: February 22, 2012 5:10 pm
 

30 BCS schools vote against scholarship proposal

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The new NCAA legislation allowing schools to offer multiple-year scholarships to athletes only narrowly survived its recent override vote, with only two of the 330 votes cast needing to have swung the other way to have nixed the legislation, despite the support of NCAA president Mark Emmert. The overwhelming majority of support for the override came -- as expected -- from non-BCS or mid-major schools worried over the potential increase in costs.

But a report in the Chronicle of Higher Education shows that a healthy portion of BCS conference schools also voted for the override. According to this NCAA document obtained by the Chronicle, 30 different current and future BCS members supported the override, including the entire Big 12. The Big 12 was also the only BCS conference that exercised its institutional vote in favor of the override.

The Big Ten was the conference most solidly in opposition to the override, with only Wisconsin voting in favor. Among the other high-profile programs voting against multiple-year scholarships were Alabama, Clemson, Florida State, LSU, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Texas A&M and USC. After the Big 12, the conference with the most votes in favor of the overrides was the ACC, with five. (The Big East did have six override votes if future members Boise State, Navy and San Diego State are included.)

As for that 30 vote tally, the opinion here is that that's only slightly fewer than 30 too many. It's one thing for cash-strapped mid-majors or even BCS schools on a notably tight budget -- say, Rutgers or Colorado, both of whom supported to override -- to oppose a measure they would struggle to afford, giving more cash-flush schools an instant recruiting advantage. It's another for programs like the Longhorns, Bayou Bengals, Volunteers and Sooners -- all of whom the Chronicle names as four of the 10 wealthiest athletics departments in the country -- to attempt to vote it down when they have the kinds of budgets that will barely flinch under the new scholarship burden. The motivation in Austin, Baton Rouge, Knoxville and Norman isn't that they can't hand out four-year scholarships, it's that they simply don't want to. 

Of course, the legislation doesn't mean any school -- BCS, mid-major, or otherwise -- is required to offer multiple-year scholarships. But since that might put the schools that don't at a recruiting disadvantage against schools that do, the Texases (and USCs, and Alabamas) have tried to prevent anyone from offering them.

In short: because these schools don't want to promise their athletes a full four-year college education, they've decided the athletes at other schools shouldn't have the benefit of that promise, either. 

A full BCS conference-by-conference breakdown of votes in favor of the override:

ACC: Boston College, Clemson, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Virginia

Big East: Boise State, Cincinnati, Louisville, Navy, Rutgers, San Diego State

Big 12: Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas Tech, TCU, Texas, West Virginia

Big Ten: Wisconsin

Pac-12: Arizona, Cal, Colorado, USC

SEC: Alabama, LSU, Tennessee, Texas A&M

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 12:44 pm
Edited on: February 28, 2012 1:36 pm
 

Man in accident with Tommy Tuberville's wife dies

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

An 87-year-old man who sustained injuries in a Nov. 1 car accident involving Tommy Tuberville's wife, Suzanne Tuberville, died in an assisted living facility Friday, the Lubbock-Avalance Journal reported.

Sgt. Jonathan Stewart with the Lubbock Police Department told the Avalanche-Journal in November that Suzanne Tuberville had run a red light while driving in Lubbock and struck the vehicle driven by Nelda Purdy, 73. Her husband, Ira Purdy, was a passenger in the vehicle and sustained "a significant head injury, a broken leg, [and] broken ribs," according to Purdy family attorney Bradley Pettit. 

Ira spent time both at the local Covenant Medical Center and a rehab facility before being transferred to the assisted living facility.

No charges have been filed in the case and Stewart said no citations have been issued. But Stewart did say that the investigation into the case remains ongoing. UPDATE, Feb. 28: Stewarthas now said that the investigation has been closed, with no charges yet filed.  

Both Pettit and a source speaking to Texas Tech student newspaper the Daily Toreador said that a citation had been issued to Suzanne Tuberville some time after the crash.

A Texas Tech spokesman said the Tubervilles had no comment other than to wish the Purdy family their condolences.

The Lubbock Medical Examiner's office has been asked to determine Ira Purdy's cause of death, Pettit said. Stewart confirmed the autopsy but did not say when its results might be released.

“The medical examiner was called in, they’re reviewing the case and we’re waiting for their findings," Pettit said. "We’re very confident they will find that he died as a result of the injuries from the Nov. 1 accident."

Tommy Tuberville's Red Raiders recently began spring practice and are gearing up for their spring game on March 24. But it seems unlikely Tuberville is entirely focused on football right at this moment.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com