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Tag:Dennis Johnson
Posted on: October 22, 2011 4:24 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 10 Arkansas 29, Ole Miss 24

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

ARKANSAS WON: For a half, it looked like Houston Nutt had his magic upset mojo working and working hard, with the Rebels dominating the line-of-scrimmage on both sides of the ball, Randall Mackey looking sharp (that's him scoring a first-half touchdown at right), and Ole Miss eventually going up 17-0 halfway through the second quarter. But from that point on it was -- almost literally -- all Razorbacks, with Tyler Wilson warming up after a scattershot first half and Dennis Johnson finding plenty of room for his biggest game of the year on the ground. Result: 29 straight Arkansas points just enough cushion to hold off the Rebels' late rally..

WHY ARKANSAS WON: Because the Rebels didn't run out of gas in the physical sense ... but they did in terms of their game-planning and innovation. Nutt's team burst out of the gate with plays designed to include any number of play-making weapons -- freshman receiver Nickolas Brassell foremost among them -- and sly misdirection that gave Mackey several easy throws. The junior former JUCO transfer responded by starting 8-of-9 and throwing the best pass of his career -- a beautiful lofted 31-yard throw to Donte Moncrief -- that gave the Rebels a 10-0 lead.

But as soon as Bobby Petrino got his team into halftime still in the game (thanks to a Johnson 53-yard touchdown run on 3rd-and-14, a major turning point), adjusted to shorten Wilson's frequent (and frequently unsuccessful) downfield throws, got Johnson going, and never looked back. Nutt and his staff deserve plaudits for their early-game approach, but once the game turned, they had no answers--as seen most clearly on a second down on their own 1-yard line, late in the third quarter, already down 24-17. With Mackey having already looked deep on first down and failed, the Rebels tried a simple sweep to the right for Jeff Scott, and the Hogs snowed it under for an easy safety. By the time Nutt and his staff reclaimed their offensive spark, it was too late.

WHEN ARKANSAS WON: The game looked well over at the 8:30 mark of the fourth quarter, with Arkansas taking over at their own 42, up 29-17, with all the game's momentum. But the Rebels forced a three-and-out, drove 80 yards for a touchdown on their ensuing possession, and then recovered an onsides kick to start at their own 43 with 1:23 in which to score the game-winning touchdown. But Mackey was sacked on first down, and threw an interception on second to end the game.

WHAT ARKANSAS WON: Not a lot of kind words from Petrino and their coaches after that start. But Johnson looked like he's ready to give the Hogs a legitimate ground game for the first time all season, and we doubt anyone in Fayetteville's going to turn down a W after staring at a 17-point hole on the road. (And that said comeback came against Houston Nutt? Well, then, all the better.)

WHAT OLE MISS LOST: the Rebels' 10th straight SEC game, a school record. It would be encouraging to stay as competitive as Ole Miss did against a top-10 team after the blowouts they've already endured this season ... except that that 17-point lead represented the kind of golden opportunity Nutt simply can't afford to blow if he's going to coach next season. His job remains on a knife edge.

Posted on: October 8, 2011 11:42 pm
Edited on: October 8, 2011 11:45 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 10 Arkansas 38, No. 15 Auburn 14

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

ARKANSAS WON: The Razorbacks spotted Auburn a 14-7 first-quarter lead but finished the game on a 31-0 run as the Tigers' passing attack continued to flail and the Hogs eventually caught up to Gus Malzahn's running game. While Auburn's quarterbacks combined for a 9-of-25, 4.2 yards-per-attempt, zero-touchdown, three-interception performance, Tyler Wilson was his usual steady self: 24-of-36, 262 yards, 7.3 YPA, two touchdowns, no picks. But the highlight reel play of the game belonged to wideout Joe Adams, who took a handoff and went 93 yards for a third-quarter touchdown, the second-longest run in Razorback history.

WHY ARKANSAS WON: It's not their run defense, that's for certain; a week after giving up 381 rushing yards to Texas A&M, the Hogs gave up 290 more to Auburn, with the Tigers' one-two punch of Michael Dyer and Onterio McCalebb combining for more than 200 yards alone.

But even one terrific dimension isn't usually enough to make up for the lack of a second, as Auburn found out when their offense ground to a halt over the course of the final three quarters. Arkansas, meanwhile, kept moving in large part due to their excellent balance: 7.3 yards averaged over their 36 passes, 5.7 yards on their 31 runs. Sure, many of those rushing yards came on Adams' 93-yard lightning bolt -- the game's pivotal play, taking the Hogs from up 7 and backed up deep in their own territory to two a clear two-touchdown lead -- but Dennis Johnson and Broderick Green ground out plenty enough yards themselves (89 combined on 28 carries) to keep Auburn honest.

Combine that balance with a precision red zone attack that scored 31 points on its final five attempts, and Bobby Petrino's attack finished the night as a model of efficiency--a (relatively light) 438 yards, but 38 points. Auburn's defense had a better day against the Hogs than it did a year ago (or than it did earlier this year vs. Clemson or Utah State), but it hasn't caught up with the likes of Petrino and Co. yet.

WHEN ARKANSAS WON: Auburn actually responded well to the Adams run, using an exchange of punts to flip field position and then driving to the Arkansas 23. But then Malzahn elected to let run-first true freshman Kiehl Frazier make a rare passing attempt ... which was promptly picked off by the Hogs' Eric Bennett. Auburn wouldn't come close to threatening again.

WHAT ARKANSAS WON: Technically speaking, The Hogs remained only a game back in the SEC West race. But more realistically, they reasserted themselves as the SEC's third-best team, stayed in the mix for a top-10 poll position in the near future, and remain cleanly in line for a Capital One Bowl berth. As ugly as that loss to Alabama might have been, Arkansas remains well on track for another superb season.

WHAT AUBURN LOST: A 5-1 start with two massive SEC road wins would have silenced Auburn's doubters for good; as it stands, the Tigers still have work to do if they want to come out of their brutal October slate any better than 4-4. Next week's home date with Florida could be a make-or-break game for both teams.



Posted on: September 24, 2011 7:02 pm
Edited on: September 24, 2011 7:43 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 3 Alabama 38, No. 14 Arkansas 14

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



ALABAMA WON: If there were any last lingering doubts about the Crimson Tide's national championship bona fides, they were erased in Tuscaloosa today. Alabama dominated the visiting Razorbacks in all three phases, getting 211 yards from scrimmage from Trent Richardson (on 10.6 yards a touch), scoring two touchdowns on special teams, and holding the previously red hot Hog offense to a miserable 3.96 yards per-play, 226 total. Given the kind of team Arkansas should prove to be this season, this goes down as the most impressive performance of the 2011 college football season to-date. LSU: your move.

WHY ALABAMA WON: We're man enough to admit when we're wrong, and when we wrote yesterday that the Tide secondary could be beaten deep? Judging by Saturday's evidence, we were very, very wrong. Tyler Wilson completed 22 of his 35 passes before giving way to Brandon Mitchell in the fourth quarter, but for only 185 yards--5.3 an attempt. Again and again Wilson was forced to check down to slithery receivers like Joe Adams or Jarius Wright, and again and again Mark Barron, Dre Kirkpatrick and the rest of the Tide secondary was there to smother them well short of the sticks. The Hogs' inability to get deep was encapsulated by a 3rd-and-1 play in the fourth quarter, when Wilson executed an excellent play-action fake, looked deep towards Greg Childs and fired ... only for Childs to be blanketed in double-coverage by Barron and Kirkpatrick, who only missed out on an interception by colliding with each other.

Combine Arkansas's lack of any kind of downfield threat with their near-total feebleness in the run game (19 yards, .9 per-carry), and it's no surprise they enjoyed just one gain (one) longer than 20 yards. The Hogs were forced to drive the field on the Tide, and we have serious doubts anyone can drive the field on the Tide.

WHEN ALABAMA WON: A comeback from 31-7 down in the third quarter was never likely, but the Hogs could at least dream after getting a highlight-reel touchdown pass from Wilson to Cobi Hamilton and following it up with a stop and drive across midfield. But the aforementioned play-action failure on 3rd-and-1 led to a Dennis Johnson run up the middle on 4th-and-1 ... which Dont'a Hightower mercilessly stuffed. With just 3:30 left in the quarter, that stuff ended whatever remaining threat Arkansas represented.

WHAT ALABAMA WON: The right to be called the best team in the country ... pending what Oklahoma and LSU do later Saturday night. The battle for No. 1 is officially a three-horse race.

WHAT ARKANSAS LOST: Any right to be mentioned in the same breath with the Tide and Tigers at the top of the SEC. The Hogs are banged-up on defense and were a poor matchup for the Tide on offense, but their lines simply aren't physical enough or powerful enough to battle the current consensus top two.

THAT WAS CRAZY: You didn't think we'd wrap this post up without mentioning Marquis Maze's spectacular third-quarter punt return for touchdown, do you? Adams was supposed to be the big special teams threat this game, but Maze's weaving Play of the Year candidate had more than a little to say about that:


Posted on: September 16, 2011 4:32 pm
 

Arkansas's Wright, Bequette to miss game vs. Troy

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The good news for Arkansas is that their schedule has handed them the home game against Troy this week and the road trip to Alabama next week. The bad news? A pair of key starters for the Hogs will head into that critical SEC West showdown without getting a tuneup against the Trojans.

Bobby Petrino announced Thursday that both senior defensive end Jake Bequette and senior wideout Jarius Wright will miss his team's matchup against Troy Saturday, Bequette with a tweaked hamstring and Wright with a strained knee. The Razorbacks may also be without  star receiver Greg Childs, whose grandmother passed away this week.

None of those absences should matter much against the Trojans. For one thing, the Hogs have capable replacements; Bequette's spot will be filled by sophomore Chris Smith, already tied for the team lead in tackles-for-loss with 2. And as for Wright, this is where the Hogs' national-best depth at receiver comes into play. Even if Childs misses the game as well, Arkansas can still start a pair of Biletnikoff Award Watch List members in Cobi Hamilton and Joe Adams.

For another, after their 43-19 loss to Clemson in Week 1, this may not be a vintage Troy squad. And the Hogs even have some good news to report on the injury front, as explosive running back and kick returner Dennis Johnson is due to return from a hamstring injury of his own.

But the questions surrounding Bequette and Wright's absences aren't about to subside no matter how well the Hogs play against Troy. For Petrino's team to win in Tuscaloosa, they'll need all of their most talented players  -- which, without question, includes Bequette and Wright -- playing at something close to their best games. So: will they be healthy enough for that? Will they have any rust after missing the last game and a half and a big chunk of practice time? If they are rusty, will they have any hope of hanging with a team of the caliber of the Crimson Tide, on the road?

Thanks to the schedule-maker, things could be worse for the Hogs. But given the uncertainty that now surrounds the team's best pass-rusher and field-stretching receiver, things could be a lot better, too.
Posted on: August 12, 2011 6:42 pm
Edited on: August 12, 2011 6:44 pm
 

With Knile Davis out, now what for Arkansas RBs?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

While the future of the SEC hangs in the balance in College Station and Birmingham, the present of the SEC took an unfortunate turn Thursday when Arkansas running back Knile Davis suffered a season-ending ankle injury.

The SEC's leading returning rusher and a pick by many to make first-eam All-SEC despite the presence of potential All-Americans like Marcus Lattimore and Trent Richardson, Davis was set to be arguably the foundation for Bobby Petrino's entire 2011 offense. His loss is a savage blow to a program that had yet to uncover a true workhorse back since Darren McFadden, at least until Davis roared onto the scene in the second half of 2010. Making things worse, second-leading rusher Broderick Green was lost for the year in the spring with an ACL tear.

But obviously, the show in Fayetteville will go on all the same--and given the weapons Petrino has at his disposal at wide receiver and quarterback Tyler Wilson's abundant potential, it could still be quite a show. (Wilson went 16-of-20 in the same scrimmage in which Davis was injured.) Here's the Hogs' top options to replace Davis:

Ronnie Wingo: The Hogs' next leading rusher in 2010 -- though with only 253 yards -- the 6'3", 227-pound junior from St. Louis will likely have first crack as the offense's everydown back. Wingo provides both a brusiing straight-ahead running style and a receiving threat out of the backfield; he caught 27 passes a year ago for more yardage (274) than he gained on the ground. But Petrino would likely want a starter who'll do more than grind out three- and four-yard gains. Would Wingo be explosive enough?

Dennis Johnson:  Perhaps the back with the highest upside among the remaining candidates, Johnson's combnation of speed, power and elusiveness has made him a fearful weapon when focused and healthy--witness his 107-yard, 7.6 yards-per-carry outburst in the Hogs' 2009 near-upset at Florida, or his pair of career kick returns for touchdowns. But that hasn't been often, as Johnson played in just two games a year ago thanks to a freak bowel injury. Reportedly healthy again, don't be surprised of Johnson winds up getting the majority of the Hog carries this season. 

Kody Walker: Despite his Maxpreps ranking as the nation's No. 6 "big back" in the class of 2011, Arkansas was the Jefferson City, Mo. product's only SEC offer, choosing the Hogs over Minnesota and Missouri. But the early returns are that Petrino may have found a gem, as Walker gained 66 yards on 15 carries in a recent scrimmage and earned praise from Hog offensive coordinator Garrick McGee. Though clearly behind Wingo and Johnson in the pecking order, Walker is in line to earn the occasional spot carry--and maybe even more if he proves himself capable.

Kiero Small: A converted linebacker fresh out of JUCO, the 5'10", 255-pound Small has already made a big impression at fullback. Though not a candidate for major carries, Small could be used a goal-line and short-yardage option much as Green was a year ago.

All in all, things could be a whole heck of a lot better for Arkansas at running back. But with two experienced options still in the fold and Johnson in particular (in this writer's opinion) possessing the talent that could still make him a difference-maker in the SEC, things could be a whole lot worse, too.


Posted on: April 15, 2011 5:34 pm
 

Hogs lose Broderick Green for season

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The injury bug snuck up and took a bite out of Arkansas on Friday, though if there's any silver lining, the Razorbacks did not lose a starter. Senior running back Broderick Green tore the ACL in his left knee and will miss the entire 2011 season.

“Broderick had been doing a great job this spring and had been working extremely hard,” Arkansas' Bobby Petrino said in a statement released on Friday. “Although this is unfortunate for him, I know Broderick will focus during the recovery process. Our trainers and medical staff are among the best in the country and will assist him in overcoming the injury.”

Green suffered the injury in practice on Wednesday as the team prepared for it's spring game this weekend.

Green came to Arkansas after transferring from USC in 2009, and started five games for the Razorbacks. Serving as a backup to Knile Davis in 2010, Green ran for 365 yards and 3 touchdowns on 104 carries. Still, while the presence of Knile Davis means that this injury won't be a devastating blow to the Arkansas offense, and it likely won't prove problematic for the team's depth at running back.

Ronnie Wingo Jr, who rushed for 253 yards and a touchdown last season will likely move up the depth chart to become Davis' backup, with Dennis Johnson picking up some carries as well. Johnson only had 9 carries in 2010, but the rising senior rushed for 562 yards during his first two seasons in Fayetteville.

Posted on: September 13, 2010 7:33 pm
 

New worst football injury ever discovered

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Arkansas tailback/return specialist Dennis Johnson is out with an injury. That is all that we are comfortable with discussing about this story without needing a deep breath or two.

You should stop reading this right now.

Still here? Okay. Johnson is out with what coach Bobby Petrino called a "bowel injury," and if that doesn't sound horrifying enough, the particulars of how he suffered said injury... well, here's what the Hog Blog had to say about it:

The injury required Johnson to undergo surgery in Little Rock shortly after the game. Petrino said he was “very, very concerned” about Johnson because of the severity of the injury, but “encouraged” by his progress since the past couple of days.

“We’re not even thinking about timetables for his return right now,” Petrino said. “We’re just thinking about his health. Hopefully he’ll improve. He’s doing well. He was up walking, they’ve got him up walking. He’s very, very sore from the surgery. We’re encouraged by everything the doctors are telling us on how he’s doing health wise.”

Seriously, stop reading right now.

“I haven’t asked him how he thought it happened,” Petrino said. “But when he came off the field, our strength and conditioning coach, (Jason) Veltkamp said he talked about falling on the ball and landing on the ball. Initially thought it was a rib injury. But that was not the case. When we were out on the field, in the locker room, toward the end of the game, he started throwing up and then they knew it wasn’t a rib injury and got him to the hospital.”

Video of this injury is not available, as it is legally classified as a snuff film.

Now, it should be noted that technically, any part of the large intestine could be considered the "bowel," and the large intestine stretches higher than the waistline. So that, combined with the fact that the S&C coach thought it was a rib injury (there's no ribs down there, after all), could mean that Johnson's injury was far removed from the worst imaginable place to receive an injury. But still--bowel has a common connotation with one very specific part of the body, so if it was high in Johnson's large intestine, wouldn't they just be better off calling it an "intestinal" injury? Y'know, so we don't assume the worst? Either way, we're glad to hear he's recovering from surgery and that he'll be okay, because good heavens.

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com