Tag:Greg McGarity
Posted on: July 30, 2011 3:50 pm
Edited on: July 30, 2011 3:51 pm
 

Georgia hit with secondary violation for texts

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Georgia was hit with a Level 1 secondary violation by the SEC following some inadvertant text messages that Mark Richt sent to a recruit's father in May. However, there isn't much for Georgia fans to worry about since it isn't likely Georgia will be punished severely considering that the texts Richt did sent contained no content.

In fact, when you read about how Richt ended up texting the father of Jordan Jenkins, Ron Jenkins, you get a nice glimpse of how silly some NCAA violations can be.
In [Georgia AD Greg] McGarity’s May 27 letter of explanation to [SEC Commissioner Mike] Slive, he reports that Richt accidentally sent two text messages from his Blackberry to the father of Harris County defensive end Jordan Jenkins on May 26th. Jenkins is considered by many the top prospect in Georgia. Text messages to prospects or their family members are impermissible per NCAA rules until one day after a prospect has signed a national letter of intent with the school.

In the first instance, Richt received a text from Ron Jenkins asking for camp dates. Since Richt did not have the number programmed in his phone, the text was identified as “unknown.” Richt intended to forward the text to a recruiting assistant for identification but accidentally replied to Mr. Jenkins, which was a violation NCAA Bylaw 13.4.1.2.

Richt immediately reported the inadvertent violation to compliance director Eric Baumgartner, who subsequently asked Richt if Mr. Jenkins had replied. In an attempt to forward Mr. Jenkins’ response to Baumgartner, Richt accidentally replied to Mr. Jenkins again, hence he had to report another text violation.
Such a scandal. Stay tuned next week for when Les Miles gets in trouble for sharing funny photos with a recruit on his Google reader.
Posted on: July 18, 2011 12:30 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 12:37 pm
 

Georgia suspends Carlton Thomas

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Georgia's depth chart at running back is quickly becoming the Bermuda Triangle of college football. It feels like name after name is disappearing. First it was Washaun Ealey and Caleb King, both of whom are no longer a part of Georgia's football team, and now Carlton Thomas will be taking at least a game off.

A report in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution says that Thomas has been suspended for at least one game this season.

The rising junior from Frostproof, Fla., violated team rules back in the spring, three persons familiar with the situation confirmed to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. As per Georgia Athletic Association student-athlete policy, Thomas has to sit out 10 percent of scheduled games this season.

“If we have any announcements regarding suspensions, they’ll be made at the appropriate time,” Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity said, declining further comment.

This all means that for Georgia's season opener, the Bulldogs now have three running backs available to play. Two of them -- Isaiah Crowell and Ken Malcome -- have never played a down of college football. Then there's Richard Samuel, who does have playing experience, but unfortunately it's all been at linebacker as the Bulldogs just moved him to running back last week.

For a lot of football teams, being so short at running back in the first game of the season wouldn't be that big of a deal because most teams start their seasons against FCS schools or maybe a Sun Belt foe. That's not the case at Georgia, because the Bulldogs will open the season against Boise State at the Georgia Dome.

Of course, that game is still more than a month away, and who knows how many more running backs Georgia will lose by then? 

Posted on: May 15, 2011 2:27 pm
Edited on: May 15, 2011 2:29 pm
 

Richt: oversigning 'an awful thing to do'

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Could the SEC be headed towards a showdown over oversigning?

Mike Slive has promised the league will "take a look" at stronger measures to address the issue during its annual spring meeting, and you don't have to squint to see two factions forming as regards that "look": one featuring coaches like Nick Saban and Steve Spurrier (amongst others) who have defended their use of "grayshirts," and one with Florida president Bernie Machen and Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity who would like to see it prohibited.

So where does Mark Richt's allegiances in this potential battle lie? If McGarity's position didn't already make them plain, his comments to a Greenville (S.C.) gathering of Bulldog alumni this past week put them beyond all doubt:
"If you sign a class, you can only bring in as many as you have room for, so let's say you have 85 on scholarship and let's say you have 15 seniors graduating. Well, there's only 15 more spots for 85, you can sign 25 guys, by rule, and in February you can sign those 25 guys," Richt said. "Now, by the time that season starts, you may have more attrition, five more guys may leave for whatever reason, may go pro, transfer, so let's say you're down to 20.

"You've got 20 spaces but you've still signed 25. Well, you can bring them in during the summer, work them and let your strength staff work with them, and decide which ones you like the best. The other five, you can tell them, 'Hey, we know we signed you, we expect you to come in, but we don't have space for you, we're sorry, but you have to leave and come back in January.'"

After a brief pause, Richt gave his feelings on that particular tactic.

"I think that's an awful thing to do," Richt said. "It's nothing that we have ever done since we've been at Georgia."
Of course, with his very next breath, Richt admitted that he had "talked to a kid about grayshirting" before Signing Day, in the unlikely event the Bulldogs roster remained too full for fall enrollment. (He said that despite those discussions, the Bulldogs' recruits had all "come in with their class.") It'd an admission that illustrates how difficult legislating change would be for Slive and proponents like Machen. How do you write a rule that differentiates between the kind of agreed-upon-by-all-parties scenario Richt describes, and a case like LSU's Elliott Porter, who last August was asked to move out of his LSU dorm room after Les Miles ran out of scholarships?

We're not sure. But given his vehemence, it sounds like Richt will be perfectly happy to see Slive and Co. try ... or simply do away with grayshirting all together.

HT: the AJC.

Posted on: March 9, 2011 2:15 pm
Edited on: March 9, 2011 5:02 pm
 

Georgia self reports 5 NCAA violations

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Take not of this, Jim TresselGeorgia found out about five violations the school committed stemming from its recruitment of defensive end Ray Drew and it reported them right away. Georgia didn't wait eight months in hopes that Drew could still play this season or anything!

The violations are all of a secondary nature, and are mostly a result of former Bulldogs Randall Godfrey and David Pollack -- a current analyst on ESPN -- attending Drew's commitment ceremony in January.
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has learned that UGA had to report five NCAA rules violations to the SEC as a result of Drew’s Jan. 28 news conference at Thomas County Central High School. Drew, a five-star recruiting prospect, announced that day he was committing to the Bulldogs.  The 6-foot-5, 250-pound defensive end has since signed a national letter-of-intent with UGA.
Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity detailed the violations in a March 4 letter sent to SEC Commissioner Mike Slive. That letter was obtained by the AJC through an open records request.
“The University of Georgia (UGA) is reporting an institutional violation of NCAA Bylaws . . . within our program,” McGarity wrote in the letter. “The violation involves prospective student-athlete (PSA) Mr. Ray Drew and two former letter winners who appear to be representatives of the University’s athletics interests.”
Neither Godfrey or Pollack are named in the school's report, but there's plenty of evidence they were there from photos, and their presence is what caused Georgia to look into the case to begin with. The violations being of a secondary nature, it's not likely that the NCAA will impose any kind of punishment on the school, but odds are the SEC will. Though I wouldn't expect there to be loud repercussions.
Posted on: March 1, 2011 3:51 pm
 

Spurrier: oversigning a "ticklish situation"

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The Offseason of Oversigning continued to make headlines last week when a pair of South Carolina recruits publicly admitted they were told less than 24 hours before Signing Day that the Gamecocks would not have room in their 2011 class for them. (Though academic concerns may have played a role in Steve Spurrier and his staff's decision, other Gamecock recruits with similarly uncertain grade issues were not asked to grayshirt.)

Thanks in part to the timing of that story, it seems, the Wall Street Journal has also turned its attention to oversigning . In this piece , published yesterday, SEC head coaches Spurrier, Houston Nutt, and Bobby Petrino each defend their team's having signed more players than permitted by the NCAA's 25-players-per-class or 85-players-on-scholarship limits.

Petrino said he signed according to a formula that took players' academic standing into account and included players with "absolutely no chance" of qualifying; on oversigning in general, he said he doesn't "see it as a bad thing unless you're being dishonest or waiting until the last minute." Similarly, Nutt said he had never waited until the last minute to tell a recruit "oh by the way you don't have a scholarship." (This might be news to receiver Collins Moore, who Nutt told a week before Signing Day he didn't have a scholarship at Ole Miss, at least not until 2012.)

But the most interesting quotes of all belonged to the "Ol' Ball Coach," who criticized the Big Ten for not oversigning ("I think that really hurts them a lot"), said that initial problem with the two potentially grayshirted recruits was that more prospects had chosen the Gamecocks than had been expected, and that they'd been chosen because they were the two commitments with the most work to do academically. Most intriguing of all, Spurrier admitted he could have handled the "situation" more smoothly:
"What we probably could've done earlier in the recruiting is tell them that this could happen," he said. "But then again, we didn't know it was going to come up. It's a ticklish situation."
"Ticklish" or not, the coach of one of those players clearly isn't happy with the Gamecocks over their approach:
[Jordan] Montgomery's high school coach, Walter Banks , said, "I told them this was foul. I didn't have a clue until 18 hours before signing day, and if they say anything else, they're lying."
To be fair to Spurrier and the other coaches, the story's bevy of quotes from recruits (and their parents) makes it clear that oversigning isn't a particularly big concern on their end (though that also seems to stem from the abundant self-belief that they won't be the ones in danger should the roster ax end up swinging). And with at least one of the two Carolina recruits (and possibly both) still planning on enrolling in Columbia once they can, it's safe to say the parties most immediately affected don't see Spurrier's actions as -- to quote Florida president and grayshirting critic Bernie Machen -- "morally reprehensible."

But whether it's an issue to recruits or not, whether Spurrier and the other SEC coaches defend it or not, the assault on oversigning from power brokers like Machen and Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity mean legislative change on oversigning could be coming all the same. (Maybe as soon as this year's annual SEC meetings , if Mike Slive is to be believed.) And until/unless that change happens, Spurrier and the rest of the SEC can't expect the negative attention from outlets like the Journal to simply go away.
Posted on: February 7, 2011 10:50 am
Edited on: February 7, 2011 4:56 pm
 

UGA looking for more coaching help on the D-line?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Georgia's already-impressive Signing Day haul got even more impressive over the weekend as 6'4", 340-pound JUCO defensive tackle-slash-colossus Johnathan Jenkins signed with the Bulldogs. Now there's just one question: who's going to coach him?

You'd expect that to be longtime Bulldog defensive line coach (and recruiting ace) Rodney Garner, but the departure of inside linebackers coach Warren Belin for a position with the Carolina Panthers last week has muddied the waters. But the mandatory ad posting to fill Belin's position didn't ask for a linebackers coach , reading instead:
This position serves as Assistant Coach in the area of Defensive Ends. Responsibilities include recruiting talented athletes to play the sport of football as well as guiding and encouraging student-athletes toward graduation at the University of Georgia.
This would be a strange allocation of coaching resources on Mark Richt's part, since the Dawgs run a 3-4 defense in which only one player not a "defensive end" sees the field at a time. Tackles and ends are routinely coached by two different coaches in a 4-3, but the move in a 3-4 would seem to be nearly unprecedented at the college level. If Garner was seriously being asked to coach only nose tackles like Jenkins, wouldn't that be something of a slap in the face?

Which is why the odds that Georgia's actually looking for an out-and-out ends coach seem low. Athletic director Greg McGarity said there was simply a mixup in the language between the athletic department and human resources. Defensive coordinator Todd Grantham said he "wouldn't put any stock " in the wording of the posting. The Bulldogs could also be looking for someone to coach the outside linebackers in their 3-4 -- the players that would, of course, correlate to DEs in a 4-3 -- while Grantham occupies Belin's role as the inside 'backers coach.

So it's likely the only real news regarding Georgia's coaching staff to come out of this past weekend is the hiring of UAB's   Will Friend , a former Georgia graduate assistant, to replace Stacy Searels as the Bulldogs' offensive line coach. But until a new face is officially unveiled on the defensive side of the ball, some level of intrigue is going to remain.

HT: GTP


Posted on: November 19, 2010 11:14 am
 

Georgia and Boise State to open 2011?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Nothing's officially official just yet, but the tea leaves are all but screaming that Georgia will face off against Boise State in the annual Chick-Fil-A Kickoff game. Asked point-blank about the possibility yesterday, both Mark Richt and Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity offered leading no comments , and the AD for current opening-week Boise opponents Ole Miss cryptically tweeted that ESPN was delaying a "big football schedule announcement."

All of that would be enough to call the blockbuster all but a done deal, but this morning we also got the following from Georgia legend and current Atlanta radio personality Buck Belue :



As Belue's tweet indicates, between the loss of much of Boise's roster and the Dawgs' slide to their current 5-6 record, the meeting won't quite be the mega-matchup it would have been this year. But any collision between Boise and the SEC -- not to mention the South's legion of avowed Bronco skeptics -- is still must-see television.

The Bulldogs will point out that the last time Boise came east to face the Dawgs, the Broncos were run out of Athens behind a bevy of Jared Zabransky turnovers by a score of 48-13. But 2005 was a long time ago, and with a carrot like this to tempt us throughout the offseason, the minute the 2010 season is done, 2011 won't get here fast enough.
Posted on: October 25, 2010 1:00 pm
 

Georgia's come a long way, baby

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It was just three weeks ago, after a humuliating 29-27 defeat at Colorado (the same Colorado, incidentally, that's currently sharing the Big 12 North basement with winless Kansas ) that the question wasn't if Mark Richt would be relieved of his head coaching duties at Georgia , it was when : midseason, after another flogging at the hands of Florida in the World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party? Or at year's end, after defeats to bitter rivals Auburn and/or Georgia Tech ?

Richt might still find himself in hot water if he can't get past the Gators, Tigers or Yellow Jackets, but after three emphatic wins over fellow SEC East rivals Tennessee , Vanderbilt , and Kentucky , Richt's ship officially appears righted and the Dawgs find themselves just a game out of the divisional lead. How complete has the Dawg overhaul been? Despite Georgia's 3-17 record against Florida since 1990 and losses by a combined 90-27 score the past two seasons, Vegas oddsmakers have installed the Dawgs as 3-point favorites over Urban Meyer 's reeling Gators for this week's annual grudge match.

The odds on that decision were probably off the board following the defeat in Boulder, a loss that newly-installed Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity doesn't seem to have entirely forgotten about just yet. From the Department of Backhanded Compliments, McGarity's thoughts on the Dawgs' season to-date :

 

“At one time it didn’t look it was going in the right direction for our program. And I have to credit Mark with what he was able to do, to basically rally the troops after a rough run there and a tough game at Colorado,” McGarity said on Monday.

Georgia was 1-4 after that loss at Colorado. Richt called a full-pads practice for the next Monday, saying it was the first time he has done that at Georgia.

“I think that Monday really set the tone for the season. I really do,” McGarity said. “That different tone, and Mark being a man enough to take some responsibility to say we probably made some mistakes the front end, in terms of the practices and the two-a-days ...

“If you’re always looking at ways to get better, then I think you have to do things that are a little out of your comfort zone. And that may be admitting that you make mistakes. But the ability to make it publicly, and chart that, I think that’s a credit to him.”
No doubt McGarity is sincere in his respect for Richt's ability to change course and willingness to (successfully) improvise once that improvisation became necessary.

But his recognition that Richt failed to have the program going in "the right direction" coming out of preseason practice (particularly given Richt's track record for slow starts) suggests that as far as Richt has brought the Bulldogs the last three weeks, if he can't bring them past the worst Florida team of Meyer's tenure with a squad playing as well as any in the SEC (Auburn excepted), we still won't be certain how much longer Richt will be allowed to bring them anywhere. If a coach who can admit his mistakes is nice, a coach who doesn't make them in the first place is better.


 
 
 
 
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