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Tag:Tom Osborne
Posted on: December 22, 2010 6:56 pm
 

Assistant salaries: Who's overpaid? Underpaid?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

After earlier compiling a database of all 120 FBS head coaching salaries for the recently completed 2010 season, USA Today today released a look at the salaries of the nation's assistant coaches, all 907 of which are available for comparison here . Your highest-paid assistant: Texas ex-defensive coordinator Will Muschamp at $900,000 per year. The lowest amongst coaches actually drawing a paycheck? Leon Lett -- you remember him ! -- who's being paid just $12,000 to coach defensive tackles at Louisiana-Monroe.

Inbetween on the scale are some 900 other coaches (not counting those working at private institutions whose salaries are not public information). Ignoring certain obvious choices (yes, Greg Davis was overpaid, yes, Dana Holgorsen was a bargain), looking only at 2010 results, and making allowances for coaches in their first year at a new school, here's three choices for the country's most underpaid and most overpaid assistant coaches:

MOST DUE FOR A RAISE

Don Treadwell ($235,250), offensive coordinator, Michigan State.
Despite possessing few playmakers known to fans outside the Midwest, Treadwell guided the Spartans to a top-20 finish in yards per-play and offered his team an enivable balance with better than 2,000 yards rushing and 2,800 passing. He also took over for two games as interim head coach while Mark Dantonio dealt with a heart ailment, winning both. And he did all this for the cost of less than many SEC position coaches.

Jeff Casteel ($372,268), defensive coordinator, West Virginia. Casteel's not doing too badly for himself, salary-wise, but compared to what his fellow DCs are earning in the SEC, Big 12, etc., he's still a bargain. With virtually no nationally-recognized players and few star recruits, Casteel quietly put together the nation's third-ranked unit in total defense and third in scoring defense; the Mountaineers were the only defense in the country to allow 21 points or fewer in every game.

Tom Osborne ($220,000), special teams/tight ends coach, Oregon. Osborne put together arguably the best set of special teams units in the country, leading the Ducks to top 20 finishes in net punting and kickoff coverage, coaxing a 12-of-16 performance from his two kickers, and along with returner Cliff Harris creating the most dangerous punt return unit in the nation, one that racked up better than 18 yards per return and scored five game-changing touchdowns. The Ducks probably aren't in the national title game without him.

Honorable Mention: Manny Diaz ($260,000), defensive coordinator, Mississippi State; Pete Kwiatkowski ($259,520), defensive coordinator, Boise State; Al Borges ($205,000), offensive coordinator, San Diego State.

MOST DUE TO NOT RECEIVE A RAISE

Norm Chow ($640,000), offensive coordinator, UCLA.
That figure includes a $250,000 retention bonus designed to keep Chow in Los Angeles, but maybe the Bruins would have been better off being spared paying the nation's eighth-highest assistant's salary for the nation's 109th-best offense.

Tyrone Nix ($500,000), defensive coordinator, Ole Miss. For Nix's salary, the Rebels could have had Gus Malzahn, who earned the exact same amount this season from Auburn. Malzahn will earn quite a bit more next year, obviously, but Nix won't after overseeing a defense that utterly collapsed in the embarrassing season-opening loss to Jacksonville State and went on to finish 105th in yards allowed per-play.

Stacy Searels ($301,200), offensive line coach, Georgia. Offensive line coaches do very well in the SEC, with several topping the $300,000 mark. If we ignore the low-hanging fruit that was Steve Addazio's season in Gainesville, none had a more disappointing season than Searels, whose Bulldog charges looked to have the makings of one of the nation's strongest ground games at the close of 2009 and entered 2010 with as much experience (and talent, arguably) as any line in the country. Instead the Dawgs finished 10th in the SEC in rushing and middle-of-the-pack in sacks allowed (despite ranking 9th in passes attempted) as Searels wound up forced to juggle his lineup late in the year. Searels has done outstanding work before and likely will again, but 2010 wasn't his best moment.

Dishonorable Mention: Chuck Long and Carl Torbush ($350,000 each), offensive and defensive coordinators, Kansas ; Nick Holt ($650,000), defensive coordinator, Washington; Greg Robinson ($277,100), defensive coordinator, Michigan.
Posted on: December 9, 2010 10:54 am
Edited on: December 9, 2010 11:00 am
 

Nebraska starting DT suspended for bowl game

Posted by Chip Patterson

As Bo Pelini's name gets tied to high-profile job openings (rumors which athletic director Tom Osborne was quick to squash), Nebraska still has the task of preparing for their last postseason bowl game as a Big 12 representative.  Nebraska was given no preferential treatment with their bowl bid, falling to the Holiday Bowl December 30 in San Diego.  Not only is the caliber of the game an insult to the Big 12 North division champions, but they are facing a Washington team they handily defeated 56-21 earlier this season.  Oh yeah, that game was in Seattle.  So if the focus is not completely there in Lincoln, it would not be a huge shock.

But there is a difference between lack of focus and lack of judgement.  Sophomore defensive tackle Baker Steinkhuler received a one-game suspension from Pelini for a drunk driving arrest earlier this week.  The hometown standout from Lincoln Southwest High School has started all 13 games for the Cornhuskers in 2010, and will watch the rematch with the Huskies from the sideline.  His absence may not have a difference in the outcome, but you'd hate to be left with "What If's" in the situation that Jake Locker explodes and leads Washington to the upset in his final game.      
Posted on: November 23, 2010 6:21 pm
 

VIDEO: Nebraska player gets a TSA inspection

Posted by Adam Jacobi

During last Saturday's game against Texas A&M, Nebraska tight end Ben Cotton had one of the most eventful single plays from scrimmage a player could possibly have. In one play, Cotton recovered a fumble from teammate Cody Green, then was flagged for unnecessary roughness, then got another 15-yarder for unsportsmanlike conduct after he ripped his helmet off while leaving the field.

Oh, also, Cotton got one of the most uncomfortable "inner thigh massages" outside of an airport security gate in decades. Here's the video, which is not going to be comfortable to watch at all. Watch it anyway.

That's Texas A&M defensive tackle Tony Jerod-Eddie with the invasive procedure. Wonder what he was looking for.

Not surprisingly, Nebraska has decided to send film of the game to the conference for review. Bo Pelini declined to discuss any specifics of what plays the school may be protesting, but this play must be near the top of the list. Of course, if this lousy officiating was really some Big 12 conspiracy, it's not exactly going to matter if Nebraska complains to the conference or not, but Pelini and AD Tom Osborne ought to at least do their due diligence.

Also, Jerod-Eddie will not be suspended from this Friday's game, according to A&M coach Mike Sherman; Sherman said he had a "long" talk" with his player about respecting opponents, and that was that. Sherman's course of discipline stands in stark contrast to Man Law, which dictates that Jerod-Eddie must now be shot into space, never to be seen again. Butt stuff is no light matter.

Posted on: August 31, 2010 11:53 am
Edited on: September 1, 2010 2:39 pm
 

Nebraska takes clandestine road to the Big Ten

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Omaha World-Herald published a great piece yesterday about the path Nebraska took en route to joining the Big Ten. It's a long read, to be sure, but it's less romance novel and more spy thriller. There's clandestine meetings, coded statements, and even an unnamed tipster who gets the ball rolling. Here's one snippet: Because [Nebraska athletic director Tom] Osborne is a well-known figure who tends to attract attention, it was agreed he and the chancellor would fly separately. [Nebraska Chancellor Harvey] Perlman was joined by Joel Pedersen, the university's general counsel. Few on any of their staffs knew the reason for their travel. 

After staying overnight in a city and eating breakfast separately to preserve their low profile, Perlman and Osborne received cell calls summoning them to meet a car outside. They then rode to a rural location about an hour outside the city. 

They were greeted by Delany, Big Ten Deputy Commissioner Brad Traviolia and the conference's legal counsel. 

One thing that becomes clear from Jim Delany's behavior throughout this process is that even though tradition isn't much of a factor in Delany's large-scale decision-making, identity is still critically important. After all, Delany bucked trends with the inception of the Big Ten Network and may tinker with the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry, but when it comes down to adding another member to the conference, saying things like "we try to do things the right way" and "some things are more important than money" is still enough to send Delany's heart aflutter.

Big XII commissioner Dan Beebe and Texas president William Powers declined interview requests, and that's a shame, because their sides of the story would have been fascinating. They were the primary sources of pressure on Nebraska, after all, and now that Nebraska is in the process of bailing, some reflections on the situation from their end would be worth our attention. All in due time, probably.
 
 
 
 
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