Tag:Will Lyles
Posted on: August 20, 2011 1:11 pm
Edited on: August 20, 2011 8:25 pm
 

Lache Seastrunk leaving Oregon

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Lache Seastrunk
was one of the most highly-touted recruits every signed by the Oregon Ducks. Of course, it was the recruitment of Seastrunk that has helped Oregon land in a bit of hot water, as he was one of the players whom some believe was steered to Oregon by Will Lyles. The school paid Lyles $25,000 for recruiting services last year, though the NCAA is looking into what exactly those services were.

Now it seems that the money may have been spent for nothing, as rumors out of Eugene are swirling that Seastrunk will be leaving the program.

According to DuckTerritory.com, Seastrunk has requested his release from the school.
Sources confirm the 5-foot-9, 190 pound former five-star recruit has been granted his release paperwork from the University of Oregon. No official statement has been released by the University at this time.

He was noticeably absent from this morning's practice at Oregon.
Now it's important to point out that the report says that Seastrunk hasn't signed his release papers as of yet, so no final decision has been made. Still, the prevailing feeling in Oregon seems to be that he's leaving because he's below LaMichael James, Kenjon Barner and freshman DeAnthony Thomas on the depth chart. Odds are the Lyles situation and the attention that has brought are playing a role in this decision as well.

Baylor is mentioned in the report as a possible landing spot for Seastrunk.

UPDATE: It's official, Seastrunk has been granted his unconditional release by the school.

"We wish Lache all the best in his future pursuits and will offer our complete assistance to him in his search to continue his football and educational career," said Oregon head coach Chip Kelly in a statement.

Posted on: July 26, 2011 10:17 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 11:21 pm
 

Media Day Tidbits: Pac-12 North

Posted by Bryan Fischer

LOS ANGELES -- Following a video production that would have made Steven Spielberg proud, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott kicked off the conference's inaugural Pac-12 Media Days from Los Angeles Tuesday morning. Though he didn't make bold proclamations about the state of NCAA affairs like some of his peers, Scott did extoll the virtues of the league on the heels of landing a big new media deal.

"The last 12 months have brought monumental change to the Pac 10 conference, now the Pac 12," Scott said. "The conference moniker, Conference of Champions, has been well earned and embraced over the years. And this past year was no exception.

"This is a new era for the conference as we embrace the future, and the addition of Colorado and Utah very much helped us secure a landmark media agreement that's going to provide for unprecedented exposure nationally for the conference.

Scott focused on the accomplishments of the conference both on and off the field, noting that two players were finalists for the William Campbell Trophy, the so-called "academic Heisman." Of course, he also mentioned the fact that the league put two teams in BCS bowls and is returning two returning Heisman finalists.

"The Pac 12 brand of football, if I can describe it that way, is as dynamic as any in college sports. Year after year we seem to produce the best quarterbacks and the most sophisticated offenses in the country," Scott said. "All five of the quarterbacks that are here with us today uphold the standard of play that legends before them set."

Plenty of coaches and players also talked about their teams heading into the league's first year, here's some highlights from Pac-12 North:

Cal:

- "This is always a favorite time of the year because the players have been working hard all summer long and now it's timed to get back to work," head coach Jeff Tedford said. "The chemistry, I'm really excited about this team with the leadership, the work ethic, the team chemistry. I'm really pleased with how they've come together and their work ethic. Very eager to compete."

- The Bears failed to go to a bowl last year but, according to Tedford, they were a handful of plays away.

"Last season we fell short of that, and we're not hiding from that," he said. "We understand that there is a very fine line between winning and losing, and we're six points away from being 8-4 last year."

- Tedford said he will be more involved with play calling this season as a result, hoping to improve a Cal offense that floundered down the stretch last season.

"Offensively we need to improve. We were not close to the consistency that we needed to compete at a high level," Tedford said. "Zach Maynard has been named the started and he earned it."

- With the departure of the team's leading rusher Shane Vereen, Tedford is counting on one of his incoming freshmen to compliment his inexperienced returnees at the tailback position.

"We recruited four tailbacks and I'm excited to see what they can do," he said. "I really think we'll have one back or two be solid contributors."

- Tedford said it would be a little bit different playing two Thursday games and one on Friday. The Bears are also playing the majority of their "home" games at AT&T Park due to construction on Memorial Stadium.

"Wherever those lines are, that's what were going to focus on," he said.

- The 10th year head coach was also asked about Will Lyles since the program purchased a scouting package from the now infamous high school scout.

"I'm not concerned one bit," Tedford said. "I wouldn't know Will Lyles if he were in this room."

Oregon

- Ducks head coach Chip Kelly knew right away the questions about the program's NCAA investigation were coming early and coming often.

"I know the one everybody is waiting to have answered but we sent out a release earlier," Kelly opened his remarks to the media with. "We've cooperated fully with (the NCAA) and will continue to cooperate them."

For more on Chip Kelly's comments on the Lyles situation, click here.

- Kelly's appearance wasn't completely about the cloud hanging over his program. Fresh off a BCS National Championship game appearance, the Ducks head coach is experiencing quite the roster turnover and focused on other issues.

"I looked at our roster coming in here and I think we have 11 or 12 seniors, and we'll have 47 either freshmen or red shirted freshmen," he said. "It's a good time for us. We're excited. We start on August 8, and we have an interesting game to start the season on September 3rd that has every one of our players attention, and we'll work as hard as we can to prepare for that game on September 3rd against a really, really good LSU team."

- Luckily for Oregon's explosive offense, the Ducks aren't hurting for talent despite being young.

"LaMichael (James) is the returning Doak Walker Award winner as the nation's number one running back," Kelly said. "I've always believed that to win football games you have to be able to run the football. And we've led the Pac-10 in rushing in the last four years. Total offense the last four years, scoring offense the last four years, and LaMichael's a huge part of that."

- Kelly said he hasn't made any decisions on suspended players Kiko Alonso and Cliff Harris. Both players are working out with the team but their status for opener and beyond is still up in the air.

- Incoming recruit D'Anthony Thomas, "Can flat out run," according to Kelly and the coaching staff will figure out a way to incorporate him into the offense. Lache Seastrunk is one of the players that's a possibility to be the third string running back behind James and Kenjon Barner but nothing is set in stone because no one grabbed hold of the position in spring practice.

Oregon State

- "We're excited to be here at the dawning of the Pac-12 conference," veteran coach Mike Riley said. "But we're going to really, really have to grow a lot through fall camp and through our season. We had five guys that had off-season surgeries and missed spring practice. So as we get back into this thing, we'll have to grow a lot and be ready to compete all the way down the stretch, get better every day."

- As someone who has just about seen it all over the years, the new format with two divisions and not playing everybody every year will take a bit of getting used to for Riley but he was excited about the changes.

"I've been in the conference a long time now, 11 years, and I've seen the competition rise to where every week is like the Super Bowl," he said. "So I think it's going to be really, really competitive."

- The Pac-12 put on a seminar with their head of officiating on Monday in order to better educate the media about some of the new rules going into effect in 2011. The one rule that has drawn the most criticism is the new celebration rule, which Riley says is just something the players will have to adjust to.

"It's going to be an emphasis for the officials early," he said. "Whether or not you agree with the rules, this is what it is. I think it's going to be to a point where you're going to have to be really careful."

"You've got to deal with it," senior safety Lance Mitchell said. "When it affects the team, it's just bad all around and you have to keep it under control."

- One of the key players for the Beavers is all-everything athlete James Rodgers, who is coming off his second knee surgery but should be able to contribute this season.

"The one thing you can never do with James is count him out," Riley said. "He's been deemed ahead of schedule but I'm going to play this conservatively."

- Rodgers' brother, Jacquizz, was the team's leading rusher for the past few years but left early for the NFL, a decision Riley said was a good one despite the criticism "Quizz" took. Though there's some talent at the position to replace him in the offense, it will be a wait and see approach until one player separates from the pack.

"We don't have a number one back that can replace Quizz today," he said "I think if we look at that group it will probably be running back by committee."

- Riley expects the team to be very solid on defense and expects Jordan Poyer and Michael Doctor to be key contributors among others.
He also said key contributor Joe Halahuni will be ready going into the fall camp after having surgery in April.

Stanford:

- So what's David Shaw's deal? Apparently, it's much like Jim Harbaugh's, the man he replaced in Palo Alto.

"The differences are minimal because our biggest differences are we have different personalities," Shaw said. "We have the same goals and same competitive drive. We like to teach. I see myself as a teacher and that's the environment we've created down there."

- For Shaw's Heisman Trophy front-running quarterback Andrew Luck, not having much a transition between the two head coaches has been invaluable.

"It's definitely nice not to have to learn a new scheme, a new offense," Luck said. "Coach Shaw recruited me. He's been instrumental in my growth as a football player and ever since I've been on campus.  So continuity was definitely something that a lot of the players were hoping for when the coaching change was being made. It's definitely been easier for me, I think.

- Luck was sporting a rather large beard for his media day appearance and according to him, the first time he's grown one. Though he's not sure if he's keeping it, the humble star did make news by announcing that he would indeed be leaving Stanford after this season.

"I'm viewing this as my last college football season and approaching it as such," he said.

- On the opposite side of the ball for The Cardinal, Shaw will be using to co-coordinators on defense with Derek Mason and Jason Tarver.

"We do have co-coordiators," Shaw said. "The mix of those two guys are phenomenal. They're like an old married couple, they finish each others' sentences."

- Wide receiver and ace return man Chris Owusu missed six games due to injury last year and will be a key part of the offense this year with an inexperienced group of receivers - if he can stay healthy.

"I haven't said anything to Chris except play every game," Shaw said. "We need Chris Owusu to play every game. We've got a talented but inexperienced receiving core around Andrew."

Washington

- If there was one person in the room who was really excited to be a part of the inaugural Pac-12 Media Day, it was Washington coach Steve Sarkisian.

"Being a Southern California guy and being raised in this thing when it went from Pac-8 to Pac-10, to Pac-12, it's just exciting," Sarkisian said. "I think for us as the University of Washington and our program as we're growing, we couldn't be in a better conference at you a better time for the exposure needed for us and for this conference."

- Sarkisian talked at length about the Huskies' brand of football as the team moves on from the Jake Locker era.

"I think we've got a football team that you saw at the end of last season starting to play a brand of football that we believe in, that is one that is physical that believes in running the football and playing sound defense," Sarkisian said. "We're fortunate to have veteran leadership as we grow but we're still a very young football team. We've played 16 true freshmen last fall. And we've got veteran leaders."

- There's not much that can get a head coach going than talking about his quarterback and the former signal-caller-turned-coach had no problems praising starter Keith Price but cautioning that they would take it slow in his first year as the starter.

"He's a kid that comes to work with a smile on his face," Sarkisian said. "But the reality of it is we're not going to be able to rely on that quarterback position like we were able to with Jake for two years. It's going to be more on relying on Chris (Polk), and Jesse Callier of running the ball, then utilizing the one-on-one matchups on the outside with the Jermaine Kearse, Devin Aguilar, Kevin Smith, and maybe the emergence of a newcomer in Kasen Williams.

- With someone new behind center, many expect Polk to carry the offense on his back, something he accepts but realizes he can't really do if the team is to be successful.

"It's not necessarily on my back, because the game of football is not based off individual performances," Polk said. "So if our O-line's not working and the running game's not working and the passing game's not working."

- A few players, such as Semisi Tokolahi and Sione Potaoa'e, might be limited once the Huskies break for fall camp but the team should be close to full strength once the pad comes on.

"For the most part we're healthy," Sarkisian said. "We look good. Our guys are transforming their bodies and look great."

Washington State

- Washington State was picked last in the North Division but if there is one encouraging sign for the Cougars, it's on defense with some players who are young but have starting experience.

"There's a good chance that we'll start just one or two seniors on defense," head coach Paul Wulff said. "I'm pretty sure we're going to take a big step on defense."

- Wulff signaled out running back Rickey Galvin, wide receiver Kristoff Williams and linebackers Sekope Kaufusi and Alex Hoffman-Ellis as players who he expects to make the leap to key contributors.

- Despite being at the bottom of the conference standings for awhile, Jared Karstetter said that the Cougars are being taken more serious by other Pac-12 programs.

"Yeah, I think we were more competitive especially the end of last year," he said. "Any sort of lack of respect that we feel as a team, I think that we just use that as motivation to go out there on game day and compete and prove ourselves.

- Wulff talked at length about the type of player he recruits and specifically said the staff is looking for players with their head on straight.

"We've gone about our business to recruit the right type of person," Wulff said. "Great football players that can help you build a team. We go after guys that fit our profile."

- With a good quarterback with plenty of experience behind center in Jeff Tuel and an improved defense, Wulff thinks the team can build on last season and move up in the pecking order.

"I know through spring football, we were executing things we'd never done," he said.
Posted on: July 26, 2011 5:31 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 5:34 pm
 

NCAA moves towards closing Newton loophole

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Aside from Auburn's fans and coaches, there didn't seem to be many people happy with the NCAA's decision last fall to rule Cam Newton eligible after his father Cecil Newton admitted he'd asked Mississippi State boosters for $180,000. That even goes for people who agreed with the NCAA's ruling, like president Mark Emmert, who stated plainly (as Gene Chizik will tell you) that the NCAA had no evidence to rule that Cam knew of his father's request or that the family had received benefits from anyone ... but also affirmed that "I think it's absolutely a fundamentally wrong for a father to try to sell the services of his son or daughter to the highest bidder."

And in the interests of protecting that stance, Emmerts's organization has moved towards making requests like Cecil's an eligibility-breaker in the future. An official release from the NCAA Tuesday details a proposal for an "expanded definition of agents," one that would "include third-party influences, including family members, who market student-athletes’ athletics ability or reputation for personal financial gain."

The statement reads:

The cabinet at its recent meeting in Indianapolis agreed to sponsor legislation for the 2011-12 cycle that would define agents as individuals who either directly or indirectly:

  • Represent or attempt to represent a prospective or current student-athlete in the marketing of his or her athletics ability or reputation for financial gain; or
  • Seek to obtain any type of financial gain or benefit from securing a prospect’s enrollment at an institution or a student-athlete’s potential earnings as a professional athlete.

The new definition would include certified contract advisors, financial advisors, marketing representatives, brand managers or anyone who is employed by or associated with such individuals.

The new definition also would apply to third parties, including family members, who shop prospects to various institutions for personal financial gain. In the past, the agent definition applied generally to third parties marketing an athlete’s skills to a professional sports team. The cabinet’s proposal expands the definition to include people marketing athletics skills to a collegiate institution for personal gain.

Under the new definition, Cecil would have been acting as Cam's "agent" and -- one would assume -- having an agent operating on his behalf (even without his consent) would have resulted in Cam's having been declared ineligible. The definition might also be broad enough to include the likes of "advisors" like Bryce Brown mentor Brian Butler (or, if certain allegations involving Oregon stick, Will Lyles.)

The proposal will be reviewed at the NCAA's 2011-2012 legislative session and could be put into effect as soon as April of next year.

If we play devil's advocate for a moment, we have to wonder if it's entirely fair to prospective athletes to pay the price in elgibility for others' actions they may have no control over. (Consider a scenario similar to the famous Albert Means case: if a high school coach goes behind a recruit's back and asks a school for money in order to push the recruit towards that school, how is that the player's fault? Would their college football career be ruined all the same?)

But all the same, Emmert is right that the attempted sales of athletes' services (whether that sale is completed or not) is "fundamentally wrong." If the NCAA believes the proposed legislation might help stamp out some of those sales pitches, it's legislation they must consider.

Posted on: July 26, 2011 2:26 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 2:34 pm
 

Chip Kelly addresses Will Lyles situation

Posted by Bryan Fischer

LOS ANGELES -- Chip Kelly knew it was coming. The Oregon head coach had not spoken with the media extensively about the NCAA investigation into Will Lyles and his recruiting service but carefully avoided answering anything related to the matter despite being peppered with questions about it at Pac-12 Media Days.

"Obviously, I know the one question everybody is waiting to have answered is," Kelly said. "We sent out a release earlier concerning on -- we have great respect for the NCAA in terms of their review and examination of our use of recruiting services and we've cooperated fully with them and will continue to cooperate with them.

"As head coach of this program and of this football program, we're held accountable for everything we do. So we look forward to, when we can, I'd love to talk about it. There are a lot of answers I'd love to make sure we can get out there."

Though several recruits have said they are taking a wait-and-see approach with Oregon and the NCAA, Kelly eased Ducks fans' fears about the program's recruiting sliding.

"I haven't had to address it with the recruits right now," he said. "We're coming off back-to-back Pac-10 championships as we move into a brand-new league with a brand-new television contract, it's a bright future for us. We had a berth in the Rose Bowl, we had a berth in the National Championship Game. And I understand from the kids we've talked to, our recruit something going very, very well."

Kelly added that he has not made significant changes to how he recruits or how his staff goes about evaluating players. In regards to Lyles in particular, who Kelly has had frequent contact with in the past, the quick talker was not concerned with the outside perception of Oregon or other schools doing business with him.

"I can't speak to what any other school has done with him," Kelly said. "I know he deals with 80-some odd schools and what other services he's been involved with. But I know how we dealt with them. But again, I've got to defer to. -- I'd love to talk about it. And when we have a chance after the report comes out, I'll be able to clear up any questions that anybody has about the whole situation."



Posted on: July 23, 2011 1:15 pm
Edited on: July 23, 2011 3:12 pm
 

Oregon AD's email addresses Lyles investigation

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While Oregon hasn't made many public comments on the NCAA investigation into the school and its relationship with scout Will Lyles, athletic director Rob Mullen did send an email to a number of trustees, the alumni association board of directors and boosters this week. In the email, which The Register-Guard got its hands on, Mullen describes what the school is doing to cooperate with the investigation.

In the email Mullens wrote:
“The University of Oregon football program, from Coach Chip Kelly through the entire organization, has tremendous respect for the NCAA’s important role in monitoring collegiate athletics and, to this end, continues to fully cooperate with the NCAA’s ongoing review.”

“The University of Oregon is committed to holding itself and the individuals associated with the University accountable to the highest standards.”

“As part of the University’s commitment to accountability, we want to reiterate that the institution takes this matter very seriously and remains dedicated to an open and transparent approach with the NCAA.”
Mullen also explained the school's decision to seek outside counsel from the law firm of Bond, Schoeneck and King, a firm that specializes in NCAA compliance issues -- a firm that could end up costing the school around $150,000.
“The firm has been charged with making an independent assessment of the football program’s use of outside recruiting services. In addition, they have been asked to provide the University with recommendations for areas of improvement within the football program and athletics department in order to meet best practices.

“We look forward to making the recommendations public at the conclusion of the process. The University, our Head Coach and the entire Athletic Department are fully committed to ensuring our program is following best practices.”
Mullen sent the email out in part because Pac-12 media days will be taking place next week, and coach Chip Kelly is scheduled to face the media on Tuesday. While we don't know if Kelly is going to discuss the matter, you can bet your life savings that he's going to be asked about the situation frequently. Mullen also warned in the email that the recipients "are likely to see another round of media reports on the NCAA matter."

It's hard to predict what, if anything, will come of this investigation at Oregon. Many were predicting that Ohio State would be sanctioned back to the Stone Age thanks to the investigation taking place in Columbus, Ohio. But after Friday's announcement that the school wouldn't be hit with a "failure to monitor" charge, it looks as if Ohio State will escape the NCAA investigation relatively unscathed.

It's an outcome Oregon is no doubt hoping for itself.
Posted on: July 19, 2011 7:15 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2011 10:13 am
 

After LSU case, time for a new COI chairman

Posted by Bryan Fischer

I'm sure Dennis Thomas is a nice guy. I'm sure he's a smart guy.

According to his bio, the MEAC commissioner has brought financial stability to the conference and negotiated a new media deal in the past few years. He's done plenty of other good things in his years as a college administrator. Thomas is also the chairman of the NCAA's Committee on Infractions (COI) and tasked with leading the group that delivers findings and punishments for member schools.

And he also needs to go.

NCAA bylaws and infractions are not material designed for everyone, that's for sure. For reporters however, it has become almost a requirement to jump on an NCAA teleconference every couple of months and listen to the COI chair talk about the latest school to run afoul of the rules.

In the past six days, Thomas has been on a call with the media twice to discuss Georgia Tech's and LSU's NCAA infractions cases. Each time he has been vague, avoids direct questions and generally sounds like your grandpa does when he can't hear you talk about the ballgame because reception on your iPhone isn't that good.

For those who write about or explain things on-air about these often complicated cases, Thomas's style in answering questions has been extremely frustrating.

What takes the cake however is the almost comical exchange between him and FoxSports.com reporter Lisa Horne, who was interested in what might happen to LSU if the school was found to have committed violations in the ever-expanding Willie Lyles probe - a violation that would have happened prior to Tuesday's ruling but obviously a case the NCAA would be charging the university with afterwards. For nearly three minutes (and after Horne repeated the question three times) Thomas still couldn't give a clear and concise answer. You can listen to the call for yourself here.

On page 18 of LSU's public infractions report, it reads:

As required by NCAA legislation for any institution involved in a major infractions case,  Louisiana State University shall be subject to the provisions of NCAA Bylaw 19.5.2.3, concerning repeat violators, for a five-year period beginning on the effective date of the penalties in this case, July 19, 2011

To be even clearer than reading the report - which apparently Thomas could not have done - if LSU is found to have committed a major violation relating to the Willie Lyles fiasco, the school will not be punished as a repeat violator because the violations themselves took place before July 19th.

Simple, concise and directly from the report.

This is all on top of many reporters getting frustrated with Thomas' ability to not answer a question during Georgia Tech's conference call. Now it's not like previous COI chairs were any better on these calls but one would think that for one of - if not the - most powerful committees in the NCAA, the chairman would be well spoken enough to handle the media and be able to recall questions about bylaws relatively quickly.

Unfortunately, based on his time as chairman, Mr. Thomas is not.

So if the NCAA (and the member schools who could very well appear in front of the committee in the coming years) really wants to stop taking a hit from media members who bash the process, I'd suggest they start with a new COI chair. An NCAA task force that examined the infractions process suggested earlier this year finding a spokesperson for the committee to deliver reports, "someone who is media savvy."

To the fine folks at the NCAA and member schools: Either make this happen or get rid of the current chairman. You need someone who knows what they're talking about and can, well, talk.

And if you think it's just a few reporters that are upset about this, don't even begin to ask about the coaches.

Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:33 am
Edited on: July 19, 2011 11:50 am
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Yesterday LSU head coach Les Miles talked about how important it is to cooperate with the NCAA in any investigation, saying that it was "fundamental" and "necessary." Miles said that when asked about LSU's recent discussion with the NCAA regarding its relationship with Will Lyles. While that's a situation that likely won't be resolved for some time, LSU may find out shortly how cooperating with the NCAA can be beneficial to a program when it comes to possible penalties.

In 2010 LSU self-reported recruiting violations that took place in 2009 to the NCAA and had a hearing in front of the Committee on Infractions this past April. Now, according to a tweet from Yahoo's Charles Robinson, the NCAA has a conference call this afternoon to discuss the committee's decision in regards to LSU's case.



The violations LSU reported stem from the recruitment of former defensive tackle signee Akiem Hicks and former assistant coach D.J. McCarthy.  LSU found that McCarthy's recruitment of Hicks included improper phone contact, transportation and housing. Hicks never attended LSU and McCarthy was relieved of his duties after the violations were found. LSU also self-imposed recruiting sanctions on the program by docking two scholarships in its 2011 recruiting class along with its 2012 class.

Whether the NCAA will impose any further sanctions against LSU, well, we'll find out soon enough it seems. Though since LSU self-reported the issue, imposed its own sanctions and cooperated with the NCAA, I wouldn't expect any possible further punishment to be too severe.
Posted on: July 18, 2011 11:50 am
Edited on: July 18, 2011 12:39 pm
 

Les Miles talks about the Will Lyles situation

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As the NCAA continues to investigate Will Lyles and his ties with schools across the country -- with his relationship with Oregon garnering the most attention -- it's not just keeping its nose in the Pacific Northwest. The NCAA has also taken the time to talk with LSU and head coach Les Miles, as LSU has paid Lyles $26,000 since the 2008 season, including $6,000 in 2010. The same year that Oregon paid Lyles $25,000.

While there's no evidence to show that LSU's relationship with Lyles has been anything other than school and scout, it's not exactly the kind of attention any program wants right now, especially when most of what you hear or read about with Lyles has to do with him steering recruits to Oregon.

Les Miles spoke about the NCAA's visit to Baton Rouge on Sunday night while in New Orleans on a speaking tour.

"I think it's fundamental. I think it's necessary. We're going to comply. We're going to be very cooperative," Miles told the USA Today. "That's really all I can say."

Which, if we've learned anything about NCAA investigations around the country for the last year or so, is probably the best route to take. It's clear at this point that the best thing any school or coach can do is be honest with the NCAA. It's a lesson Jim Tressel had to learn the hard way recently at Ohio State, and could be one that Chip Kelly learns in the future depending on how the NCAA investigation at Oregon turns out. 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com