Tag:Adam Jacobi
Posted on: September 11, 2011 4:21 am
 

What I learned from the Big Ten (Sep. 10)



Posted by Adam Jacobi


1. Michigan and Denard Robinson, the night is yours. What could there possibly be to say about the Michigan-Notre Dame contest that would properly suit such a game, such a finish? Then again, as those fake old Adidas uniforms (shown above) proved, "proper suiting" had no place in this game, so let's talk about it at length. Michigan slept through the first three quarters, trailing the Fighting Irish 24-7 at the third intermission in a game that didn't even seem that close, and Denard Robinson looked completely ill-suited to succeed in the Brady Hoke/Al Borges offense.

At that point, naturally, all hell broke loose. Michigan scored on the first play of the fourth quarter when Notre Dame stuffed a Wolverine halfback dive at the goal line and forced a fumble ... only the ball bounced right to Robinson, who ran the recovery in for an easy score before anybody else knew what was happening. Robinson would then engineer three more touchdown drives almost singlehandedly, the last taking all of three plays and 28 seconds before Roy Roundtree came down with the game-winning touchdown pass from Robinson with two ticks left on the clock.

The thing of it was, though, Robinson's passing wasn't even good. His accuracy was way off all day, and two of Robinson's three interceptions were absolutely unconscionable throws (including a screen pass that sailed at least five feet over his nearby receiver's head). Even after Robinson came to life late in the third quarter, his big plays were mostly underthrows and jump balls that so markedly didn't fit the arc and timing of the routes that Notre Dame's secondary struggled to adjust to where the throws ended up being, even while they were ostensibly providing good coverage.

And yet still, football is not about style points, it is about actual points, and those comical throws ended up netting Michigan enough actual points to seal the victory and set off a party at the Big House that didn't stop until the police were forced to tell the student section to go home. May all college football games end so delightfully for the home partisans, right?

2. It was pretty rough everywhere else. Michigan beat Notre Dame. That was a marquee win for the conference, without a doubt. But elsewhere, Big Ten members lost to Alabama (fine), Virginia (um), Iowa State (no), Rice (NO), and New Mexico State (NOOOOOOO). The wins, by and large, weren't really impressive either. Ohio State barely scraped by Toledo, and Nebraska caught four tough quarters from Fresno State. And those are two ranked division crown contenders! In the Big Ten! Elsewhere, Illinois and Northwestern throttled their FCS opponents, while Michigan State and Wisconsin took care of business against two wretched FBS opponents in FAU and Oregon State, respectively. That's, um, not a good week.

Of course, BCS Championships aren't won in Week 2, only lost, and aside from maybe Iowa (though that ISU win didn't look like an upset at all), the teams that lost today by and large weren't serious contenders for division titles to begin with. We've got a lot of football left in the year, and teams turning their seasons around after a rocky opening are hardly rare in college ball. That all said, if it's not time to panic yet for the five Big Ten teams with blemished records, it's certainly time for significant concern.  

3. Jerry Kill gets seizures sometimes. The TCF Bank crowd was shocked into silence and play was stopped in the waning seconds of the Minnesota-New Mexico State game on Saturday when Gophers head coach Jerry Kill collapsed and went into a seizure on the sideline. Kill would end up on the ground for about 15 minutes before being carted off and hospitalized. Shortly thereafter, Minnesota medical staff would assure reporters that Kill's life was never in danger, that he has had this seizure disorder for years, and that he will be fine, but still -- that was a terrifying sight.

The interesting aspect of the episode's aftermath is the series of revelations about Kill's disorder, namely that not only will Kill be fine, but he's had similar incidents before and never ended up missing a game of work. That seems unusual to people unfamiliar with seizures -- which would be most people, if we're being honest -- since generally, when someone collapses suddenly, doctors aren't clearing them to work the next week. And yet that's precisely the case with Kill, who has not been given a timetable for a return but will likely do so for Minnesota's next game. Let's hope his seizures don't make a habit of returning, of course, but let's also be thankful that they're generally not life-threatening or even career-altering.

4. Penn State's quarterback situation may be worse than we all imagined. Let's get one thing out of the way right off the bat: Alabama's defense is fantastic this year. Not only is it easily the best Penn State will face this year, it might be one of the ten best defenses Joe Paterno has ever faced. They're going to make a LOT of quarterbacks look bad this year.

That all said, Robert Bolden and Matt McGloin didn't just look bad on Saturday, they looked like they didn't belong on a D-I football field. Bolden finished 11-29 for 144 yards and one interception, and McGloin was an incomprehensible 1-10 for 0 yards. Really. Their wide receivers didn't do them a whole lot of favors, it should be pointed out, and Alabama's coverage was suffocating, but Bolden and McGloin routinely made bad throws regardless of the coverage. It can't have helped that the two QBs were rotated in and out with casual-at-best regard for their on-field performances, and it's likely that JoePa tires somewhat of the platoon situation in the near future, but it was also obvious that neither quarterback is playing at anywhere near a high level, and that's a dire situation without an obvious or effective fix. Not to put too fine a point on it, but this could easily submarine Penn State's season, and Joe Paterno really doesn't have many more seasons to sacrifice to the Bad QB What Are You Gonna Do gods.
Posted on: September 11, 2011 12:13 am
 

QUICK HITS: Michigan 35, Notre Dame 31

Posted by Adam Jacobi

MICHIGAN WON. The Michigan Wolverines won a thriller in Ann Arbor Saturday night, coming back from a 24-7 deficit in the fourth quarter to upend the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 35-31 in what will be one of the wildest finishes of the year. Denard Robinson was his usual do-everything self, throwing for 338 yards and four touchdowns, and rushing for 108 yards and another score. The two teams scored three touchdowns in the final 1:12 of the game, with Michigan's winning score coming with just 0:02 left on the clock.

HOW MICHIGAN WON: Two words: Denard Robinson. Robinson threw for three of his four touchdowns in the fourth quarter alone (and rushed in a one-yard fumble recovery for the fourth), and he accounted for 237 of Michigan's 240 yards in that final quarter of play. He made throws that required his receivers to make the more athletic adjustment to the ball, and the Wolverines responded admirably; Roy Roundtree, Junior Hemingway, and Jeremy Gallon in particular made play after play on deep passes in the second half, even in heavy coverage.

WHEN MICHIGAN WON: Notre Dame led for the vast majority of the game, and even Michigan's first lead of the game only lasted for 42 seconds. But Denard Robinson led Michigan straight down the field in three plays and found Roy Roundtree on a jump ball in the end zone with two seconds left, giving Michigan its final margin of victory.

WHAT MICHIGAN WON: This victory was inestimably important for Brady Hoke and his charges, as they put together a rally that will be remembered for decades and beyond by Michigan faithful. That it came against rivals Notre Dame and under the lights adds an extra layer of mythic glory to it all. The Michigan offense looked dead to rights in the first three quarters. Now future opponents know the deluge can happen at any moment, even in the new-look Al Borges offense.

WHAT NOTRE DAME LOST: Notre Dame should believe that it had no business losing that game, because it didn't. QB Tommy Rees shredded Michigan all night long, with the Irish racking up over 500 yards from scrimmage (315 passing, 198 rushing tonight) for the second straight game and registering 28 first downs to Michigan's 16. Unfortunately, Notre Dame also turned the ball over five times for the second straight week, with two turnovers coming inside Michigan's 5-yard line and another coming inside the Michigan 30. That's a lot of points coming off the board, and in a four-point loss, those mistakes are fatal. Notre Dame has a lot going for it, especially on offense, but the turnovers cannot continue.

That monumental bad fortune, however, might have an insidious cause: the logos on Notre Dame's helmets were three-leaf clovers, and not four-leaf clovers. What ever happened to the "luck of the Irish"?

THAT WAS CRAZY: The entire fourth quarter. All of it. Everything. College football is the greatest sport in America and this game is why. 

Posted on: September 10, 2011 8:08 pm
Edited on: September 10, 2011 9:56 pm
 

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill suffers seizure

Posted by Adam Jacobi

UPDATE - Minnesota has issued an official release: 

University of Minnesota head football coach Jerry Kill suffered what Gophers team doctor Pat Smith described as a reoccurrence of a seizure disorder with 20 seconds remaining in Gophers’ 28-21 loss to New Mexico State Saturday at TCF Bank Stadium.

Kill was immediately attended to by medical personnel. Dr. Smith said his vital signs were normal as he was cared for on the field. He was then transported by ambulance to a local hospital for further observation.

“Coach Kill has a history of seizures, which has been well controlled through medications,” Dr. Smith said during a postgame news briefing. “There is a history of trouble with dehydration and heat seems to kick that up. It was very hot and humid today.

“We were able to give him medications to sedate him,” Smith continued. “He was breathing, his vital signs were absolutely normal and responded typical of someone responding to a seizure.”

Dr. Smith provided University officials with a further update early in the evening following the game and said that Kill was stable and awake, but medicated. He said that Kill was improving and talking with his wife Rebecca, but would undergo further testing as a precaution.

According to Dr. Smith, Kill is expected to recover fully, but said that it was too early to give a timetable for his return to the team.

----------------------------------
In the waning seconds of New Mexico State's 28-21 victory at Minnesota, Gophers head coach Jerry Kill suffered a seizure on the sidelines and was taken directly to the hospital. He is currently in stable condition.

With 20 seconds left in Minnesota's last drive of the game on a 3rd down, Kill fell to the ground and began twitching and flailing. Big Ten Network cameras captured the incident briefly, but quickly cut away as soon as the cameraman realized what was happening. Kill remained down on the field for several minutes before he was put onto a stretcher and carted out of the stadium, as shown at right.

According to Minnesota RapidReporter Dana Wessel, Kill has a history of seizures after his battle with kidney cancer, and this latest episode kept him on the field for 15 minutes before he was carted off. Kill's condition had been made known to the players long before this incident, according to quarterback MarQueis Gray, and considering Kill suffered a seizure during a game in 2005, it'd be hard to keep the disorder a secret.

At any rate, Kill returned to coach the next week after the last in-game seizure and has not missed any games due to seizures, and he is expected to be fine in this instance as well. Minnesota doctor Pat Smith addressed the media after the game and told reporters Kill "was at no time under any risk," and that Kill's reaction to the seizure was normal.

Kill's seizure is likely the result of the heat on the field and dehydration. Temperatures in Minnesota reached the upper 80s on Saturday afternoon.
Posted on: September 10, 2011 7:33 pm
Edited on: September 11, 2011 4:33 am
 

QUICK HITS: Alabama 27, Penn State 11



Posted by Adam Jacobi

ALABAMA WON. The third-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide cruised to victory in Happy Valley on Saturday, besting Penn State 27-11. Trent Richardson ran for 111 yards and two scores against a tough PSU defense, and Eddie Lacy chipped in 11 carries for 85 yards for the Tide. Alabama held Penn State to just 251 yards on the day.

WHY ALABAMA WON: Alabama had a vaunted defense, and it showed up to play in this game, but it's also clear that Penn State's quarterback situation is just about a disaster. Rob Bolden was just 11-29 for 144 yards and one bad interception, but his performance was downright virtuoso compared to Matt McGloin, who went 1-10 for 0 yards. That is not a typo. McGloin's quarterback rating for the game was 10.0, which is just about as bad as it gets. Credit for that goes to Alabama's defense, to be sure, but both PSU quarterbacks were missing throws badly over the course of the game.

WHEN ALABAMA WON: The Alabama defense was so stifling that pretty much any lead would be safe, but when Richardson ran 13 yards to pay dirt with 6:14 left, making the score 27-3 and pushing the big back over 100 yards, PSU fans were free to head to the exits.

WHAT ALABAMA WON: Penn State's offense may have been an exercise in ineptitude, but its defense is legit, and Beaver Stadium is still one of the most intimidating home fields in all of college football. So coming into Happy Valley and leaving with a 24-point win is a tremendous accomplishment for Alabama, and the Tide now has a feather in its cap as it continues to prepare for the SEC and a potential championship run.

WHAT PENN STATE LOST: If Penn State had any confidence in its quarterback situation, it's gone now, as neither QB looks capable of beating a legitimate Big Ten defense -- or even being an effective "game manager," as the term goes. McGloin won't go 1-10 every week, of course, and there'll be better days against worse defenses, but Penn State's prospects for conference play look much bleaker than they did before this game.

THAT WAS CRAZY: With Penn State leading 3-0 late in the first quarter, Alabama needed a kickstart to its offense and found itself facing 4th and 1 at its 40. Nick Saban called a fake punt rush by Brad Smelley. Smelley took contact at the line of scrimmage after what Saban would later say was a blown block, and barely, barely got the ball across the first down line. Alabama would later score a touchdown on the drive, and the Tide never looked back.

Posted on: September 10, 2011 2:36 am
Edited on: September 10, 2011 2:48 am
 

QUICK HITS: Arizona State 37, Missouri 30

Posted by Adam Jacobi

ARIZONA STATE WON. It was a wild one in Tempe, with Arizona State picking up a 37-30 win in overtime over No. 21 Missouri. QB Brock Osweiler was a revelation for Arizona State, going 24-32 for 353 yards, three TDs, and no picks. Osweiler also made some big plays with his feet, finishing with five rushes for 34 yards and another score. The big quarterback's target of choice was wideout Aaron Pflugrad (seen at right in Osweiler's embrace), who ended up with eight catches for 160 yards and two scores.

WHY ARIZONA STATE WON: It's hard to pin the outcome of a game on one last-minute string of inadvisable coaching decisions when A) the outcome of the alternative is unknown, and B) the other 59 minutes of regulation gameplay featured 60 points scored. And yet, with 21 seconds left in the game and Missouri lining up for a go-ahead 48-yard field goal, Mizzou head coach Gary Pinkel called time out. Then after the teams had gotten set again, Pinkel called time out again, icing his own kicker twice. Kicker Grant Ressel would push the field goal wide, sending the game into overtime, and Missouri's comeback would fail thereafter.

WHEN ARIZONA STATE WON: When Missouri QB James Franklin's desperation heave on 4th and 5 fell harmlessly to the turf. ASU looked ready to put the game away early in the 4th quarter after taking its largest lead of the game at 30-16 and forcing a quick punt by Missouri, but PR Jamal Miles muffed that punt and Missouri recovered, sparking the 14-point comeback over the rest of the quarter. ASU was fortunate to get to overtime, but once there, the Sun Devils squashed the Tigers.

WHAT ARIZONA STATE WON: This was a significant enough win for Arizona State that some fans stormed the field afterwards, and really, who can blame them? Missouri isn't exactly a Top-5 team, but the Tigers were still ranked No. 21, and the game featured enough emotional highs and lows that whichever team prevailed was going to have an enormous boost of confidence both in the locker room and in the stands.  

WHAT MISSOURI LOST: This was a tough pill for Missouri to swallow, no doubt about it, and what makes it especially rough on Tiger fans is the fact that the game was nearly in hand. Missouri was on the edge of field goal range with a little under a minute left and two TOs in its pocket when Pinkel went conservative with the playcalling, keeping the ball on the ground and making no attempt at the sidelines, then saving the time outs for after Ressel lined up to kick. If anything, Missouri fans lost some confidence in Pinkel's endgame coaching acumen, though it's not terribly likely the players themselves share that sentiment. Still, better teams than Mizzou have gone on to lose their resolve and turn in a subpar season after a backbreaker of a loss like this, so it'll be key for Pinkel to make sure his players stay focused on the games in front of them.

THAT WAS CRAZY: The penalties. The penalties. The penalties. The two teams combined for 23 flags for 224 yards, and that's just the penalties that weren't declined. Defensive penalties routinely kept drives alive, and offensive penalties killed scoring chances. If only icing one's kicker were a penalty, though. Maybe then Pinkel would have thought twice. Still, this was one hell of a game, and it's too bad the last drive and overtime didn't reflect the quality of the rest of the game.

BONUS THAT WAS CRAZY: Ressel also had a 54-yard field goal attempt at the end of the first half. Like the game-winning attempt, this one also failed. It did, however, connect with the face of one unfortunate photographer (GIF via @HuskerLocker):

Posted on: September 9, 2011 6:26 pm
Edited on: September 9, 2011 6:33 pm
 

NCAA hasn't reinstated three Ohio State players

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Last week, Ohio State suspended RB Jordan Hall, CB Travis Howard and S Corey Brown for the Akron game after learning the three players had accepted $200 for their presence at a Cleveland charity event. Ohio State expected its three suspended players to be reinstated by the NCAA for this week's game at Toledo following the conclusion of the NCAA's investigation.

Problem: the NCAA never agreed to a one-game suspension. As a result, all three players will be sitting out their second straight game.

Here's the official statement from Ohio State:

The three Ohio State University football players suspended for last week's game have not been reinstated by the NCAA and will not participate in the game Saturday against the University of Toledo. The university continues to work with the NCAA on the reinstatement process and is hopeful that the student-athletes will be reinstated soon. The university will have no further comment. 

On its face, this appears to run counter to the NCAA's speedy reinstatement of several suspended Miami players who had accepted much more than $200 from disgraced booster Nevin Shapiro. The problem for Ohio State is that this is more than an issue of just punishment; the NCAA is not satisfied with the results of its investigation, and the fact that the three players gave conflicting reports to officials and investigators about why they were at the fundraiser and who paid them cannot possibly help their case for an expedited reinstatement.

To that end, here is the official statement from the NCAA (emphasis ours):

Contrary to recent media reports, Ohio State football student-athletes Corey Brown, Jordan Hall and Travis Howard are not cleared to compete in the game on Saturday with University of Toledo. The nature and scope of their violations merit a minimum two-game suspension. In addition, the facts submitted by the university have raised further questions that need to be answered before the reinstatement process is complete. 

Two of the three suspended players named a former Buckeye as the source of the money, and the third named a "representative of athletics interests." All names were redacted by Ohio State on the documents acquired by the Columbus Dispatch.

It is strange that we live in a world where athletes in a multi-billion dollar sport/industry can be taken out of competition for something as insignificant as accepting a $200 gift, and it's been made clear recently that Ohio State has a few boosters who don't have much respect for those rules, but they are still the rules. So as long as giving money to players is still illegal, as long as the NCAA's sniffing around Columbus because of previous violations, and as long as the NCAA won't reinstate players who are being evasive with an investigation, it strongly behooves everybody involved with the Ohio State program to follow the NCAA's rules to a T. To do anything less is demonstrably harmful to the program, and it's strange that so many people around the team -- from Jim Tressel to everyone else who evidently wants to give these players an extra little something -- don't seem to realize this.

Posted on: September 9, 2011 3:02 pm
 

The Saturday Meal Plan: Week 2

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The Saturday Meal Plan is a helpful guide put together for you to maximize the results of your college football diet.  Just enough to leave you feeling full, but not so much you spend your entire Sunday in the bathroom.

Admittedly the menu this week is not as artery-clogging as last week's, but that's probably a good thing. After the five-day all-you-can-eat buffet that was the first week of the season, we should all eat a bit lighter this week. Of course, just because we won't be feasting on meals guaranteed to shorten our life spans, that doesn't mean there aren't some tasty entrees at our disposal.

Let's take a look at what we have to dine on this Saturday.

BREAKFAST

#8 Wisconsin vs. Oregon State - ESPN 12pm ET

It's hard to imagine two seasons starting in such opposite directions. Oregon State dropped an overtime thriller to Sacramento State, while Wisconsin breezed to victory over UNLV. If these teams play at the same level tomorrow, this could be a historic blowout. And we all like watching touchdowns by the bucket, don't we? - Adam Jacobi

#17 Michigan State vs. FAU - ESPN2 12pm ET

Howard Schnellenberger's five-game road trip to kick off his farewell season rolls into Detroit to face a Spartan team looking to rebound from a sluggish start. This was supposed to be a home game for FAU, but with the $70-million stadium in Boca Raton still under construction the contest was moved to Ford Field.  After coaching from the press box last week due to complications from hip surgery, Schnellenberger will return to the sideline and try to inspire more than 137 yards of offense for the Owls.  Michigan State fans will also want to see more cohesion out of the Spartans, who committed eight penalties and never really hit their stride against an inferior Youngstown State squad. - Chip Patterson

Auburn vs. #16 Mississippi State - SEC Network 12:21pm ET 

It won't have the divisional title implications of the Georgia-South Carolina matchup, but both the Tigers and Bulldogs will be fighting every bit as tooth-and-nail for a victory here as their Eastern counterparts will later in the day. Dan Mullen's State team wants to cement its status as a legitimate West division factor but simply can't without a win over the brutally inexperienced Tigers; Auburn, meanwhile, is in desperate danger of being branded a one-year wonder if they follow up their escape from Utah State with a loss in one of the most winnable games on their SEC slate. - Jerry Hinnen

LUNCH

#23 Penn State vs. #3 Alabama - ABC 3:30pm ET

If Penn State fans want some respect from the national media for this team, the Nittany Lions are going to have to earn it on the national stage, hosting No. 2 Alabama. The Tide is loaded again this year, but like PSU, there's some QB drama at Bama. Watch to see if McCarron or whoever else the Tide throws out there on Saturday can handle what promises to be a maniacally loud Beaver Stadium. - AJ

#13 Oregon vs. Nevada - FX 3:30pm ET

After getting embarrassed by LSU's defense in the opener, I expect Mark Helfrich to have the attack meter all the way turned up against the Wolf Pack. Darron Thomas, LaMichael James, and Co. have not derailed from their 2010 form, it just seems these massive SEC defenses are the Ducks' kryptonite.  After a frustrating loss, coaches will want to take advantage of every single snap against their next opponent.  You will want to watch this game because Oregon will put the foot on the gas pedal (Cliff Harris!) and never let up for four quarters. - CP 

Air Force vs. #25 TCU - Versus 3:30pm ET

You can be sure that TCU didn't exactly enjoy having the entire country see Baylor tear its defense apart last Friday, and the unit is going to look to save some face against Air Force on Saturday afternoon. This game will also mark the beginning of the final year of Mountain West conference play for the Horned Frogs, and I'm sure they'd like to go out with quite a bang. - Tom Fornelli

Georgia vs. #12 South Carolina - ESPN 4:30pm ET

Well, this is it: the defining game of Mark Richt's Georgia tenure. Lose it, and any shred of momentum from the "Dream Team" offseason or hope of a divisional title (most likely) is gone. Win it, and the Dawgs suddenly sit in the East catbird seat with the SEC's easiest schedule on tap. It's either the miserable end for one of the sport's most visible coaches, or the giddy start to a stunning reclamation project, with no in-between ... and Stephen Garcia's involved, too. A must-watch. - JH

DINNER

#24 Texas vs. BYU - ESPN2 7pm ET

The Big 12 of the future! Does BYU win the game in hopes of gaining a Big 12 invite, or does it show its true Big 12 street cred by allowing Texas to walk all over it? Tune in to find out! Seriously, though, this will be a much better indication of how improved Texas is this year than last week's game against Rice. BYU is fresh off a nice road win against Ole Miss and should provide a much tougher test for the Longhorns. - TF

USC vs. Utah - Versus 7:30pm ET

The Pac-12 officially kicks off conference play and it should be a good one as former BCS busters Utah will try and prove they can play with the conference's most storied program from the get-go. USC's record-setting pair of quarterback Matt Barkley and wide receiver Robert Woods won't have much time to throw the ball around as the Utes have a very good front seven this year. Old friend Norm Chow also returns to the Coliseum, this time with a solid quarterback in Jordan Wynn, so it should be a fun league opener. - Bryan Fischer

Michigan vs. Notre Dame - ESPN 8pm ET

The first night game in the history of the Big House has plenty to offer everyone. How will Michigan's defense perform this week now that it might have to play an entire 60 minutes, and do so against a Notre Dame offense that features a lot more weapons than Western Michigan's did. Also, will Denard Robinson have an encore performance of his game against the Irish last year? That's the one that made him a household name last September when he accounted for 502 yards of total offense and 3 touchdowns. - TF

LATE NIGHT SNACK

UCLA vs. San Jose State - 10pm ET

Rick Neuheisel cares. He might be the only one at UCLA who cares, but he really does care passionately about his alma matter. The Bruins hope to turn things around after their disappointing loss to Houston in which the defense looked like a mess. San Jose State isn't the most appealing opponent but it's the only late night game on Saturday and the Bruins should get the offense going no matter who's in the backfield. - BF
Posted on: September 8, 2011 4:09 pm
Edited on: September 8, 2011 4:10 pm
 

No, ASU's black uniforms won't be hotter at night

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Apparently there's some consternation on the part of Arizona State fans as the Sun Devils prepare to debut their slick new all-black uniforms on Friday night in a key Week 2 game against Missouri. Arizona's hot enough, after all -- the temperature at kickoff's going to be in the mid-100s -- so why would the home team court even more danger in the heat by wearing black while Missouri wears the comparatively chilly away whites? And why would that home team encourage all its fans to wear black in that oppressive desert heat, as ASU did? Whose dang side is this school on, anyway?

Well, for one, the kickoff's at 7:30 p.m, well after the area's 6:43 sunset. And since that evidently didn't register with all the fans, Arizona State was compelled to issue a statement complete with a quote from an associate professor explaining that no, the uniforms don't make anything worse at night:

ASU expert Michael Angilletta, who studies the adaptation of organisms to their environment in the ASU School of Life Sciences, says that the all-black uniforms the Sun Devils will debut against Missouri, Sept. 9, will have no effect as far as heat is concerned.

After sunset, when most ASU home games are played, it's infrared radiation that makes a difference, not solar radiation, says Angilletta. As a result, black clothing, whether it be uniforms or shirts and shorts, will be the same temperature as any other color of clothing. 

In other news, ice cube trays don't make ice unless they're in the freezer, a chainsaw doesn't do much for chopping down trees until it's turned on, and stepping on a crack does not break one's mother's back. This concludes the report from Why Do We Need An Expert To Tell You This News.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com