Tag:West Virginia
Posted on: May 25, 2011 7:03 pm
 

WVU AD Luck: Holgorsen actions "inappropriate"

By Brett McMurphy
CBSSports.com senior writer

Following reports that West Virginia offensive coordinator and coach-in-waiting Dana Holgorsen had been escorted from a Charleston-area casino by casino security last week, Mountaineer athletic director Oliver Luck released a statement this afternoon calling Holgorsen's actions "inappropriate."

The statements reads in full:
“After looking into the details and thoroughly investigating what took place last week, I believe inappropriate behavior did occur.
 
[Current head] Coach [Bill] Stewart and I have made it clear, and will reiterate, that our coaches and staff are representing the University and the state at all times. We expect them to always display appropriate behavior.
 
I take this matter very seriously, but I do not plan on commenting on it further.” 
Holgorsen also released a statement:
"I learned a valuable lesson from this incident. As a football coach I am always in the public eye and I have to hold myself to a higher standard, which is what I ask our players to do.  I'm sorry that this incident has put the University and the football program in a difficult position. I will not put myself in that situation again."

Posted on: May 25, 2011 1:09 am
Edited on: May 25, 2011 1:10 am
 

Report: Holgorsen finds trouble at casino

Posted by Tom Fornelli

West Virginia is looking into an "alleged incident" involving offensive coordinator and head coach-in-waiting Dana Holgorsen. According to a report in the Charleston Daily Mail, Holgorsen had to be escorted out of the Mardi Gras Casino and Resort by security early in the morning of May 18th.

Multiple sources told the Charleston Daily Mail Holgorsen was removed from Mardi Gras Casino & Resort after 3 a.m. May 18. Holgorsen had been at a Mountaineer Athletic Club function earlier in the day in Logan before spending the evening at the casino with other university representatives.

In a statement released late Tuesday night, Michael Fragale, the assistant athletic director for communications, said, "Athletic director Oliver Luck and head coach Bill Stewart have been made aware of the alleged incident. Once they have all the facts, they will deal with it appropriately."

According to police reports, local police received a call at 3:13 AM saying that a "white male" was "refusing to cooperate with the casino's management." Whatever the problem was, representatives from West Virginia who were at the casino with Holgorsen then intervened, and Holgorsen was then removed from the casino. Also according to the report, the entire incident -- whatever it was -- was caught on the casino's video surveillance.

Holgorsen was not arrested and it's believed he was released under the supervision of his fellow West Virginia representatives.

Posted on: May 20, 2011 3:39 pm
Edited on: May 20, 2011 3:42 pm
 

Friday Four Links (and a cloud of dust), 5/20

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Every Friday we catch up on four stories you might have missed during the week ... and add a few extra links to help take you into the weekend.

THE FOUR LINKS ...


1. Most of the spring buzz out of Ole Miss regarding the quarterback position hds centered on the dramatic improvement of former JUCO transfer Randall Mackey, but West Virginia transfer Barry Brunetti came on late in camp and according to many observers outplayed Mackey in the Rebels' spring game. Result? Houston Nutt saying this week that "if we had to play tonight," Brunetti would be the starter.

Nonetheless, expect this to be a battle that lasts well into fall practice.

2. Yes, there's still more updates out there on the mad, mad, mad mad world of Harvey Updyke, even following this week's fresh indictments. For one, if you remember the alleged assault on Updyke that took place after his initial court appearance, it's looking more "alleged" than ever. Local police told The War Eagle Reader that there is "absolutely nothing for us to pursue" in terms of evidence and that the case would be closed soon.

If the country district attorney has his way, Updyke will be unable to reiterate his claims with another Paul Finebaum appearance; the DA has also requested a gag order on the case.

3. Unless you're a particularly devoted fan of Phil Steele's preseason college football magazine, the release of the magazine's nine regional covers isn't something you'd, I don't know, plan your lunch break around. But we wanted to mention it all the same, just to note our love for the annual Armed Forces cover:



If you'll excuse me, I need to go find some redcoats or Communists to punch out.

4. Andrew Luck will enter 2011 as the odds-on favorite to win the Heisman Trophy (and the overwhelming one to nab the top spot in the 2012 NFL Draft), but as this study from TeamSpeedKills shows, it's a little early to start engraving his name on anything just yet; quarterbacks with QB ratings as stratospherically high as Luck's typically regress to a merely outstanding mean in their final seasons. Luck's hardly a typical quarterback, but especially without Jim Harbaugh at the offensive reins, it's something to consider.

AND THE CLOUD ...

As it had suggested previously, the SEC is officially not interested in moving any games to Sundays ... BYU is reportedly in high demand as an opponent thanks to their independence-created flexibility, but we're waiting to actually see a couple of scheduling announcements before giving them too much credit ... Purdue will be joining the throng of teams with new Nike duds to debut this season, but we don't have any images to show you yet ... An Auburn auction to sell off Cam Newton's game-worn BCS championship pants has been won by the Internet ... Nine-game Big Ten schedules are still a long, long ways off ... Two professional recruitniks are sniping at each other over the rankings of Alabama players ... and though you may have seen this already, former Kentucky quarterback/SEC folk hero Jared Lorenzen has resurfaced at quarterback for an indoor football team named the Cincinnati River Monsters. You'll be happy to know the Lefty remains as Hefty as ever.




Posted on: May 17, 2011 12:22 pm
 

College Football Hall of Fame inductees announced

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We already knew Lloyd Carr and Eddie George had made it. But the National Football Foundation today announced the other 13 players and one coach that have also been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame for the 2011 class.

Here they are, listed alphabetically with a short bio from the original 2011 Hall of Fame ballot:

Carlos Alvarez, wide receiver, Florida

1969 consensus First Team All-America and ranks as Florida’s all-time career leader with 2,563 receiving yards. . . Two-time All-SEC, setting eight conference records in 1969. . . First Team Academic All-American.

Fisher DeBerry, coach, Air Force

Coached 1984-2006 ... Winningest coach in Air Force history, leading Falcons to three conference championships. . . Led Air Force to 12 post-season berths and three-time conference Coach of the Year. . . Named National Coach of the Year in 1985, coaching 16 All-Americans, 127 All-Conference players and 11 Academic All-Americans.

Doug English, defensive tackle, Texas

Member of three bowl teams, including 1973 Cotton Bowl championship team. . . Two-time All-SWC selection. . . Member of two Southwest Conference championship teams (1972, 73). . . Averaged 10 tackles per game.

Bill Enyart, fullback, Oregon State

Named First Team All-America in 1968. . .Set school record with 1,304 rushing yards and 17 touchdowns in 1968. . .1968 Hula Bowl MVP and two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967-68).

Marty Lyons, defensive tackle, Alabama

1978 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1978 National Championship at Sugar Bowl. . .Helped team to four consecutive bowl wins and three conference championships. . .1978 SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

Russell Maryland, defensive tackle, Miami

1990 unanimous First Team All-America selection and Outland Trophy winner. . .Led Miami to four consecutive bowl berths and national championships in 1987 and 1989. . .Registered 45-3-0 record during career.

Deion Sanders, cornerback, Florida State

Two-time unanimous First Team All-America in 1987 and 1988. . . 1988 Jim Thorpe Award winner. . . Returned four interceptions for touchdowns in career. . . Holds school records for most punt return yards in a season and in a career.

Jake Scott, defensive back, Georgia

Named consensus First Team All-America in 1968. . . 1968 SEC Most Valuable Player. . . Twice led the SEC in interceptions and still holds the SEC record with two interceptions returned for a touchdown in a single game.

Will Shields, offensive guard, Nebraska

1992 unanimous First Team All-America and 1992 Outland Trophy winner. . .Key to three Huskers’ NCAA rushing titles (1989, ’91, ’92). . .Led team to four bowl berths and back-to-back Big Eight titles in 1991 and 1992.

Sandy Stephens, quarterback, Minnesota

1961 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1960 National Championship and back-to-back Rose Bowl berths. . . Nation’s first African-American All-America QB and 1961 Big Ten MVP. . . Fourth in 1961 Heisman voting.

Darryl Talley, linebacker, West Virginia

Named unanimous First Team All-America in 1982. . .Considered the most prolific tackler in school history holding the school’s record for career tackles (484). . .Member of the WVU Sports Hall of Fame.

Clendon Thomas, running back, Oklahoma

Led Sooners in scoring during two seasons (1956-1957) as part of 47-game winning streak ... Won two national titles under Bud Wilkinson ... in 1957 was named consensus All-American, finished ninth in Heisman Trophy balloting

Rob Waldrop, defensive lineman, Arizona

Two-time First Team All-America, garnering consensus honors in ’92 and unanimous laurels in ’93. . . Winner of Bednarik, Nagurski and Outland awards and Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year (1993). . .Led Cats to three bowl berths.

Gene Washington, wide receiver, Michigan State

First Team All-America who led State to back-to-back national championship seasons (1965-66) and undefeated season in ‘66. . . Led MSU to consecutive Big Ten titles. . . Led team in receptions for three-straight seasons.

Posted on: May 17, 2011 12:05 pm
Edited on: May 17, 2011 12:18 pm
 

WVU sees negative fan feedback on beer sales

Posted by Chip Patterson

West Virginia athletic director Oliver Luck (pictured) has had a particularly busy offseason.  From advising his son to return to Stanford to bringing in Dana Holgorsen as the face of the future for West Virginia football, Luck has had a hand in some of the biggest offseason headlines.  But one of Luck's goals at West Virginia has yet to be accomplished: introducing beer sales at Mountaineer football games.  

Luck introduced the idea to the Board of Governors in April, believing that allowing and controlling beer sales will help limit fan intoxication.  If fans are allowed to buy beer in the games, Luck believes that there will be less binge drinking directly before the game and fans will be less likely to sneak in airplane bottles.

The Board of Governors opened up a 30-day window for West Virginia fans to comment on the proposed idea - the reaction was overwhelmingly negative.

According to the Charleston Daily Mail, more than two-thirds of the 326 posted comments opposed Luck's idea of allowing controlled beer sales.  Fans cited an already unruly stadium, and questioned the school's ability to control the behavior.  Some fans have said the situation is already out of control with alcohol, with one fan metioning that she sees entire fifths of liquor snuck into her section.  One fan accused Luck of profiting off an already present alcohol environment, while others threathened to cancel season tickets or suspend donations if the plan is put in action.

In principle, Luck's idea is not that far-fetched.  Professional stadiums, and more than 30 NCAA schools, have been selling beer at events for some time - yet do not have binge drinking associated with the sport like college football does.  When you have to purchase beers (usually domestic, with lower alcohol content) from a concession stand, the amount of alcohol consumed over the course of a game is much less than sneaking in mini-bottles or larger amounts of liquor.  The problem is the message that it sends to the community: that West Virginia approves of alcohol consumption.  There are university communities that can get over that message and understand the logistical argument, but West Virginia is clearly not to that point yet.

All of the comments posted by West Virginia fans can be found here, on the Board of Governors official site
Posted on: May 3, 2011 6:08 pm
Edited on: May 4, 2011 2:31 pm
 

Where should Russell Wilson land?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

He's not exactly Curt Flood,   but all the same Russell Wilson may wind up serving as a college football landmark: the sport's first legitimate free agent. Cut loose from N.C. Stateeligible to play virtually anywhere thanks to his early graduation, "95 percent" likely to take advantage of that eligiblity, and -- most importantly -- a bona fide all-conference candidate with three years of starting experience and a 76-26 career touchdown-to-interception ratio. 

So Wilson represents uncharted waters for college football; while other players have been eligible to transfer without penalty, none have offered such tantalizing immediate benefits. But which school is going to be the lucky one to sail into those waters? 

We don't know. No one does, Wilson included; he's still got months of baseball ahead of him. But we can say which programs would be the best fit should Wilson decide to take a look. Here's our guesses for the comfiest landing spot for Wilson in each BCS conference, judging by both which team would benefit most by Wilson's arrival and which team Wilson would benefit most by joining. Enjoy:

SEC: TENNESSEE. Yep, we're saying the Vols, despite most of the early Wilson speculation centering on South Carolina, Ole Miss, and Auburn. But multiple reporters covering the Tigers have said they won't be interested; it makes sense considering that 2012 shapes up as a much more likely championship campaign for Auburn than 2011, and Gene Chizik won't want to spoil that with a first-year starter under center. Steve Spurrier will certainly give Wilson a ring if Stephen Garcia is finally dismissed, but if Garcia sticks around, neither he nor Wilson will want the controversy his arrival would bring. And though we have little doubt Houston Nutt would welcome Wilson with open arms rather than ride with the untested Randall Mackey or Barry Brunetti, Wilson can probably find a team with higher expectations.

Enter Tennessee. Yes, the Vols have a starter already, promising sophomore Tyler Bray. But Bray's boom-or-bust results late last season and ugly 5-for-30 spring game performance suggest that he might need more seasoning before taking the reins for a full SEC season. Bringing in Wilson lets the Vols redshirt and groom Bray for three solid seasons to follow, without taking a step back at the position; going to Tennessee lets Wilson play for a high-profile team in the nation's toughest conference, one with plenty of playmakers at his disposal. It's a win-win.

BIG TEN: WISCONSIN. An easy call: the perpetually consistent Badgers have the defensive playmakers, the ball-carriers and the receivers to put together another fine Big Ten team if they can hold the line on the offensive line ... and if they can find a quarterback. The results at the Badgers' spring game  suggest they don't have the latter yet. The stodgy Badger attack won't make much use of Wilson's mobility, but no other team in the conference offers Wilson the chance to waltz in as the unquestioned starter for a top-25 program.

BIG 12: MISSOURI. After years of Chase Daniel and then Blaine Gabbert spearheading the Tigers' aerial attack, Gary Pinkel has to feel a little spoiled when it comes to quarterbacks. But that may be changing, as Mizzou comes out of spring without a clearcut starter and with neither candidate (Tyler Gabbert, younger brother of Blaine, or James Franklin) having looked quite in the Daniel/Gabbert class. Wilson would short-circuit any potential quarterback-platoon talk immediately upon arrival and give the Tigers one of the best trigger-men their spread could ask for. Wilson, meanwhile, would have the benefit of having the ball in his hands 40 to 50 times a game, for a team whose underrated defense should make them top-25 contenders.

PAC-12: UCLA. Let's face it: the 3-9 Bruins maybe don't have a heck of a lot to offer in terms of football glory. But after their seemingly endless quarterback carousel of the past few seasons, no program would be more appreciative -- no coach more thankful -- than UCLA and Rick Neuheisel. If Wilson can salvage a winning season out of 2011 and potentially turn around the flagging tenure of Neuheisel, the gratitude aimed his way from the Westwood faithful would likely dwarf anything he'd receive anywhere else. (Besides, most of the other Pac-12 contenders -- Oregon, Stanford, Arizona State, Cal, even ineligible pseudo-contender USC  -- have fairly established quarterbacks.)

ACC: FLORIDA STATE NO ONE

[This section originally discussed the "far-fetched" possibility that Wilson could transfer to the Wolfpack's intra-division rivals in Tallahassee, but it's more than far-fetched; it's impossible, since Wilson's release -- originally, erroneously reported as "unconditional" -- specifies that he may not transfer to an ACC school or any school on NCSU's schedule. In retrospect, this is a common sense precaution. Apologies.]

BIG EAST: WEST VIRGINIA. We're kidding, mostly; Geno Smith enjoyed an excellent spring game and will be the Mountaineers' 2011 starter. And given Wilson's unwillingness to give up on a "football dream" that likely includes the NFL, he would likely pass on Dana Holgorsen's Mike Leach- inspired  "Air Raid" offense anyway, which has struggled putting its passers in the pros. But an offense like Holgorsen's, as helmed by a talent like Wilson? We can dream of those kinds of pinball games, can't we?



Posted on: May 2, 2011 9:19 am
Edited on: May 2, 2011 9:25 am
 

Despite arrest, WV player active for spring game

Posted by Chip Patterson

West Virginia nose tackle Jorge Wright made three tackles in the Mountaineer's annual Blue-Gold game on Friday night.  Wright has been playing with the first-string for most of spring drills, and the junior is thought to be the successor to last year's starter Chris Neild.  Wright might not have had the best preparation for the spring-game, since he was arrested on Thursday and arrested for misdemeanor gun and drug charges.

Wright was initially pulled over by Morgantown police when the smell of marijuana prompted a search.  The search revealed an unlicensed weapon and the possession of "a controlled substance less than 15 grams."  When asked about the arrest after the spring game, head coach Bill Stewart acknowledged that he was aware of the charges but would not take any official team action immediately.

"I have been made aware of the situation and gathering facts at this time," Stewart told the Charleston Daily Mail. I will take appropriate action when all the facts are in."

The spring game was the first competitive situation for Dana Holgorsen as the Mountaineer's new offensive coordinator.  The impact was obvious as the offense throttled the defense 83-17 before more than 22,000 Mountaineer fans.  Quarterback Geno Smith completed 26 of 37 passes for 388 yards and four touchdowns to lead the way for the offense.


Posted on: April 22, 2011 4:31 pm
 

Rodriguez talks draft, college football, and more

Posted by Eye on College Football and Eye on Football

The CBS Sports Network is in the middle of their Inside College Football: Draft Special, a series running on the CBS Sports Network in the evening leading up to the NFL Draft. The show is hosted by Adam Zucker, and includes guest analyst Rich Rodriguez. Our television counterparts arranged for Rodriguez to spend some time talking to the Eye on College Football and Eye on Football bloggers. Here were some highlights from the call.

What he would be doing right now if he was in coaching

Rich Rodriguez: This is a time right after spring practice ends where you have all your exit interviews with your players. It's the final meeting before the end of the semester where you talk about everything. Talk about academics, what their plans are and all that. Usually as a head coach you meet with every single guy, and there's 100-some guys on a team, those meetings could take a whole week. That's one thing I missed because I really enjoyed those meetings. For me that was a get to know you even better deal, even for the guys who have been in the program 3 or 4 years. Then normally in May, for a head coach it's either a fundraising month or doing a lot of tape evaluating of future prospects in the offseason.

On differences in evaluating players coming into college and coming into the NFL

RR: There are certainly a lot of parallels between evaluating a high school guy on film and a college guy, I think the difference is you can get a lot more information and a lot more film on a college guy. A lot of times you've seen them play 2, 3, or 4 years. You've seen the results of workouts, you can work them out yourself, you can get a more thorough evaluation of the players. Obviously you need to because you are going to pay the guys.

On making the jump from the spread college offense to the NFL

RR: I think it's so overstated from a standpoint of this guy played in a spread in college so he's going to have a bigger adjustment. If you look at the success of guys in the last several years, I think it's irrelevant whether they came from spread system or pro-style. I mean Sam Bradford was the first pick in the draft, he played in a spread system and he did pretty well;. Colt McCoy played, Tim Tebow also played as a rookie, and they all came from spread systems. I think it's more rather how coachable a guy is, how quickly he can learn. Even if you come from a pro-style in college, you still are going to have to learn when you get to the NFL. You have to learn the terminology, the speed of the game; in my opinion if you are in the right kind of spread and get coached up it can actually help make the transition easier because you have to make quick, active decisions. The best quarterback in the NFL makes quick, accurate decisions. It's not so much whether he can take a three-step or a five-step drop under center.

On Blaine Gabbert

RR: I have not interviewed Blaine, but everything we hear from the coaching staff, from the guys who have talked to him in the interviews - he's very sharp guy. In that system he was in they ran a lot of no-back, and you have to make a lot of quick decisions, scan the field, use your eyes the right way. Everything I've seen of him on film and what I've heard from people who've talked to him he's a sharp guy in that regard. He probably is the maybe the most ready right now, even though he comes from a spread offense. He's still got a process a learn, but I don't think there is any question in my mind that he's going to be able to make it. You just hope that an organization doesn't throw him in there for the first day. Especially with everything right now; there is no rookie minicamp, no OTA's, so guys will have to learn even quicker without a lot of information. Makes it even more important that you have guys that are sharp and can learn pretty quick.

Adjustments for quarterbacks from college to NFL

RR: The speed of the game is going to be the biggest adjustment, and the windows that you can throw in. When you go from high school to college that window becomes smaller and quicker, when you go from college to pros the windows you can throw become tighter and you have to make a quicker decision. I think learning the terminology is the first thing, the second thing is understanding how fast, how timely you have to be with your throws. Whether you are coming from a pro-style or a spread style there's still that understanding.

Conversations with NFL personnel regarding players coming out

RR: There's a lot of guys you get to know in the 25 years - 18 of being a head coach - you get a certain comfort level with scouts and NFL coaches and I've always enjoyed that part of the process. I know some college coaches don't want the guys around practice, think they can be a distraction. I've always welcomed it because I think its obviously in like with the kids' goals. You get a scout watching practice, even during the season, I always thought it would add a little pep in their step. I've enjoyed in 25 years of talking to those guys getting a feel for what they want. At Michigan you always get a couple of them. Probably had the least amount of guys in the last three years than in the history of the school just because of the transition and having a lot of young players. Whether it was at Michigan, or West Virginia, or as an assistant at Clemson or Tulane, or even back in my days of Glenville State I've always had guys come over. They can watch the talent part on film, they can watch the talent part when they practice. Usually what they want to know is "is this guy coachable? Is this a good guy? Is this a guy that will be a positive to the organization?" I love talking about it because I've always had the guys that I thought were positive people that would be an attribute or asset to an organization.

Expectations of Pat White when he was entering the NFL

RR: He may not be an every down quarterback, but I thought Pat could be really good in the role of a specialized quarterback doing some what people call "Wildcat." I also thought he could play some receiver and do some returning, and I still think he could have. But you know he took a big hit, and that kind of probably made him re-evaluate things and think about baseball. But he was a phenomenal college player. Sometimes we can get misguided into thinking that players in college, their goal is prepping for the NFL. I think the goal in college is to be as good a college player as you can be. If you do that, I think that prepares you for the NFL. Pat was a phenomenal college player, as good as any I've seen or been around. I think he could have had a role in the NFL, but you know it's very very competitive. If you get dinged up or banged up a little bit, you kind of re-evaluate what you want to do.

Any regrets in hindsight jumping from West Virginia to Michigan

RR: You know that's a fair question, and I've been asked that before. I think it's easy to go back now and say, "Gee, made a mistake." And you can say that now because of hindsight. But at the time, some of the things I was looking to do and the opportunity that was there you kind of make the move. The frustrating part for us was that we thought we battled through the tougher times to get it to this point where we had a lot of the team coming back and we thought we were getting ready to take off, but you know hindsight is always easier to look back and say, "it was a mistake." Because we did have a good thing going at West Virginia, and we really enjoyed it. As you look back at it, wasn't the best move. Easy to say now.

Getting back into coaching

RR: We played the Gator Bowl, then when we were let go in January there wasn't a lot of coaching jobs that were available. I still love coaching, I'm open to another opportunity, but we'll see. Here, that window looks like it's closed, but if something comes open after this season, and it seems like it may be a good opportunity for me and someone is interested I'm sure I'll look into it.

If the spread has "peaked"

RR: Everything is cyclical, but I think the spread is not easily defined. I'm sure you've heard coaches say this before, there isn't one kind, just like there is not one pro-style. Even though a west coast offense is pretty much a west coast offense. When you see the spread now, you know us and other teams that were using it -- Oklahoma State, other - we're still using tight ends and fullbacks they were just in the shotgun a lot, using a lot of no-huddle. I think the spread has taken so many different forms on that it's kind of here to stay. You know you see a spread team use tight ends and maybe a fullback in the shotgun, you saw it with Green Bay in the Super Bowl. I think it's constantly evolving, I think even though they still call it a spread it's not like a "run n' shoot" type of spread. It's taken on so many forms and it's evolved in so many ways I think it's probably here to stay. In the NFL there is so much talk about pro-style but there's as many or more teams in the NFL that get in a shotgun. It's not easily defined, and that's probably why it's going to stay around a while.

Running the ball in the spread

RR: There's a difference between the spread at Oregon, Auburn, some of the ones we did, and then a so-called spread in the NFL. There's a lot more running involved, and I think that's two-fold: In the NFL your guys are so much faster on the front 7, they can chase things down. I think in college you can have a little more variety, guys can be a little more creative and run a different type of run scheme than you would in the NFL. I think at some point in the NFL I wouldn't be surprised if someone starts taking a third quarterback and making him be a quarterback that can run and throw a little bit, use him in all different ways.

On coaching in the NFL

RR: I haven't thought about it much until recently. Seems like college coaches are going to the NFL, and NFL coaches are coming back to college, so those lines have been blurred a little bit as far as working. It's still working with young men and helping them achieve their goals and being around football. I had never really thought about it much until recently, and now I've always been about "What are we going to do to win a national championship." But these last couple months have given me time to evaluate and it may be kind of fun with the right organization and the right people it probably would be pretty enjoyable to coach. But I really haven't researched it much or looked into it too much but I may have some time to do that now.

On his relationship with scouting services

RR: All these individual scouting services that were popping up- you know one DVD, three or four guys, we never got involved with that. There were a few scouting services that covered a whole state, or covered a whole region, and you paid a couple thousand dollars to get information and DVDs - we used to use them. But they weren't really big in our process. We relied more on high school coaches, film, and our assistant coaches to do the evaluating. You know a guy that's shopping one or two people around and asking for six to ten grand to get one DVD on him, there's something shaky anytime that comes up. We used to use scouting services that have a lot of tapes and a lot of information on occasion. Nowadays you don't even have to do that because you can get a lot of film off the internet. Whether it's on YouTube or one of the recruiting sites on the internet, you really don't need that to evaluate your prospects.

On any changes he would implement NCAA-wide for the game of football

RR: They need to have more coaches involved in helping them with the organization. It almost seems to me there's compliance officers of the NCAA, and then there's the coaches over here. It's almost like there's a mistrust amongst coaches and we need to communicate better. I think coaches need to get in the middle of it and say, "This is what's going on, let's help clean the game up." There are some issues that need to get cleaned up, but it's better than it was 20 years ago. It's more transparent. I think that's why the issues are coming up. There's frustration with some of the things that coaches are getting in trouble for, and that's different than paying a player or getting a competitive advantage. I think that's where the coaches can say "This is what's happening out here, and this is truly giving a competitive advantage." Whether it's in recruiting or what have you. Until that happens, I think there's always going to be some frustrations out there.

For more from Rodriguez and the Inside College Football: Draft Special gang, check out the schedule below. All times eastern, contact your local cable provider for information on the CBS Sports Network.

  • Monday, April 25 (9:00-10:00 PM, ET) – Where college football’s brightest stars such as Cam Newton (Auburn), Nick Fairley (Auburn), Patrick Peterson (LSU) and AJ Green (Georgia) will be selected in the Draft, their NFL potential and how the teams they left behind replace them.

  • Tuesday, April 26 (10:30-11:30 PM, ET) – Provides a look at some lower-round projected prospects who could make an immediate impact in the League.

  • Wednesday, April 27 (9:00-10:00 PM, ET) – Examines how the Draft will impact college football’s projected Top 10 teams for 2011, as well as which teams and conferences best supply NFL talent.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com