Tag:Andrew Luck
Posted on: December 16, 2011 5:28 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Report: RG3's parents talking to agents

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Now that Robert Griffin has officially taken the world over by winning the Heisman Trophy, most people want to know what his next move is going to be. Griffin hasn't really committed one way or the other when it comes to whether or not he'll return to Baylor for another season or enter the NFL draft, but it looks like his parents are taking every precaution.

According to a report by Yahoo's Jason Cole, Griffin's parents have been interviewing prospective agents, and there's a strong chance that Griffin will declare himself eligible for the NFL draft.

Which, as bad as it would be for Baylor, only makes sense for Griffin. While he was a bit of a cult hero coming into the season amongst die-hard college football fans, he had a meteoric rise in notoriety this season culminating in the Heisman win. He's like the Arcade Fire of college football quarterbacks, except that he gets a meaningful award and not a Grammy.

So with that in mind, if Griffin does want to give the NFL a shot, it's hard to see his stock getting any higher than it is at the moment. He's not likely to be the first quarterback taken in the draft, as that will be Andrew Luck, but he's definitely a first round pick and could be the second quarterback taken.

In fact, according to CBSSports.com's mock drafts, Griffin will go in the top ten to either Miami or Cleveland.

So unless Griffin really just wants to spend another year as a college kid -- and given his personality, that's a distinct possibility -- then odds are that the Alamo Bowl will be the last time he plays in a Baylor uniform.
Posted on: December 15, 2011 10:32 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2011 12:50 am
 

USC tackle Matt Kalil to enter NFL Draft

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Although there had been a few rumors that he would return to school, USC left tackle Matt Kalil will forgo his senior season and apply for the NFL Draft. ESPN's Chris Mortensen first tweeted the news that Kalil would be leaving.

"It was definitely a tough decision because I love SC," Kalil told the LA Times. "But it’s a special opportunity. It’s time to move on."

Kalil did not allow a sack this past season and was one of the rocks for an offensive line that allowed the lowest sack total in the country. The 6-foot-7, 295-pounder also blocked four kicks on special teams when he wasn't protecting quarterback Matt Barkley's blind side.

Depending on who else declares for the NFL draft, Kalil is currently ranked as the third overall prospect in the 2012 CBSSports.com NFL draft rankings - behind underclass quarterbacks Andrew Luck and Barkley.

ESPNLA.com reported later that Kalil is expected to sign with agent Tom Condon of CAA Sports. Condon is a well-regarded agent who also represents Kalil's brother, Ryan, who recently signed a $49 million extension that made him the highest paid center in the league. The elder Kalil was a second round pick out of USC in 2007.

The winner of the Morris Trophy given to the Pac-12 best offensive lineman, Kalil will be tough for the Trojans to replace given limited depth at the position.

It is unclear whether Kalil's decision will have an effect on Barkley's decision to turn pro as well. The two are close friends and the left tackle previously said the two would either stay at USC together or leave for the NFL together.

Barkley has until January 15th to declare for the draft and has applied for an evaluation and met with coaches.

For more on Kalil's decision and the latest NFL Draft news, jump on over to the Eye on Football blog.


Posted on: December 14, 2011 1:43 pm
 

PODCAST: Pac-12 Wrap-up with Bryan Fischer

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Over the last couple of days the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast has gone over the season that was in the SEC and the Big 12, and today it's the Pac-12's turn. Our Bryan Fischer joined Adam Aizer to talk about the season that was in the Pac-12.

Was Oregon's defense a surprise or disappointment? Who was the Pac-12 MVP, Luck or Barkley? And what went wrong at places like UCLA, Utah, Arizona and Arizona State?

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.

You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.

Posted on: December 13, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Roundtable: Highlights, lowlights of bowl season

Posted by Eye on College Football



Occasionally the Eye on CFB team gathers, Voltron-style, to answer a pressing question from the world of college football. Today's question is:

What game are you most excited to watch this bowl season? Which game would you rather repair a leaky faucet than be forced to watch? And what under-the-radar bowl do you think will prove surprisingly enjoyable?

Tom Fornelli: There's three games that stand out to me as must-watches. The Fiesta and Rose Bowls present a couple of interesting matchups--a battle between Andrew Luck and Brandon Weeden should be a good time, and in the Rose we have two drastically different approaches to the run game. It's a classic Speed vs Strength showdown we see a lot when the Big Ten is involved.

Then there's the Alamo Bowl and what could be our last chance to see RG3 play in a Baylor uniform. Plus a game between Baylor and Washingtonshould give us plenty of points.
When it comes to games I'd like to avoid like the plague, I have to go with the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl. Two 6-win teams playing under interim head coaches? HOO BOY. Gotta get some of that! As for the game most people probably don't care about, but could make for a very entertaining four hours, I have to go with the next-to-last game of the season: The GoDaddy.com Bowl between Arkansas State and Northern Illinois. Not exactly a glamourous matchup, but a matchup that could feature so many points and big plays, and it's likely going to come down to who has the ball last. It'll be a great way to get my last offensive fix of the season before tuning in to see LSU and Alabama trade punts.

Bryan FischerEven though it's not on New Year's Day this year, no game gets me excited like the Rose Bowl does. The pageantry, the setting, and -- of course -- the game itself are just fantastic. This year in particular is a very interesting matchup, the speed and quickness of Oregon against the smash-mouth sytle of Wisconsin. Both have something to prove: the Ducks need to win a BCS game under Chip Kelly and the Badgers are looking to forget last year's loss. It should be another great BCS game out in Pasadena.

At the complete opposite end of the scale is the Little Caesars Bowl. Detroit in the middle of winter with a 6-6 Purdue team and 7-5 Western Michigan team is not exactly glamorous. If you want an example of why we have too many bowls, this is it. The blandness of the game would be too much for anybody to sit through if there weren't a MAC team involved. The Interim Head Coach Bo... excuse me, the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl isn't must-watch either.

I feel like a lot of people are overlooking the Outback Bowl this year. Michigan State was thisclose to getting to the Rose Bowl and winning the Big Ten title, but now head out to Florida with so much attention on rival Michigan and newcomer Urban Meyer that everybody has forgotten the Spartans won 10 games this year. Likewise, Georgia ran off 10 straight during the season and are looking to end on a high note after last year's ugly bowl loss. Of the BCS games, I can't wait to see Andrew Luck go against the opportunistic Oklahoma State defense.

Adam JacobiCo-signed on the MSU-Georgia game; I think that's going to be outstanding. One game that completely underwhelms me is Texas-Cal in the Holiday Bowl. I preferred the days of yore, when the Holiday matched up a defense-optional WAC team (usually BYU) against a Big Ten or Big 8/12 team and let the sparks fly. I don't see sparks with Texas or Cal, I see an interminable slog. In fact, the closest thing we've got to an old-fashioned Holiday Bowl is the TicketCity Bowl, which pits pass-crazed Houston and Case Keenum against Penn State's ferocious defense. All year long, fans have groused that Houston wouldn't be able to replicate its aerial assault against a "real" defense, and Ds don't get much realer than Penn State, which has talent up and down the lineup and depth. Of course, with PSU's spotty offense, 20 points might be all the Cougars need to score to secure a win, but even that's not a guarantee. Should be interesting to watch. In terms of fan experiences, Iowa State's Pinstripe Bowl visit to Yankee Stadium to take on Rutgers -- the closest thing to a "home team" possible in NYC -- should be beyond cool. In terms of actual football, it's probably going to be a horror show. Pass.

Chip PattersonThe first attempt at football in new Yankee Stadium was both a dream and nightmare at the same time.  The awkwardly aligned field and another in-state Big East team should make for a unique environment, but the inaugural Pinstripe Bowl will be remembered for the infamous excessive celebration penalty on the final touchdown that likely cost Kansas State a shot at overtime.  Throw two wildly unpredictable teams like Rutgers and Iowa State on the diamond, and who knows what will happen; it might not be that bad.

So in addition to the Kraft Hunger Bowl, I'll pile on with the Independence Bowl as lacking some flavor, because both teams are looking towards the future.  Missouri finished the season with three straight wins to become bowl eligible, but are on their way to the SEC and will be without star running back Henry Josey thanks to a freak knee injury.  Everett Withers will be coaching North Carolina for this one game, but with Larry Fedora already hired as the next head coach there leaves very little inspiration for the Tar Heels' staff to make this a game to build on for the future.  I could be wrong, but the Tar Heels did not show a ton of fight down the stretch, losing four of their final six games.

On the positive side, I'm looking forward to seeing Dabo Swinney and Dana Holgorsen making their first BCS bowl appearances as head coaches, and the showdown of high-octane styles should make for some fireworks in South Beach. The Rose and Cotton Bowls both seem like very intriguing on-field matchups, and I'm setting two DVR's to catch Luck and Weeden dueling in the desert. But I would rather watch the entire Big East regular season on loop for 2 days straight than watch Pittsburgh and SMU in the BBVA Compass Bowl.  Pitt blatantly tried to get out of the bowl and June Jones is fresh off an embarrassing flirtation with Arizona State. No thank you, BBVA Compass. I'll put my money elsewhere. 

Jerry HinnenIt's not surprising that precious few college football fans outside of Tuscaloosa and Baton Rouge seem all that pumped for a rematch of a touchdown-free 9-6 slugfest that (save for the Bryant-Denny atmosphere) played more like a lower-rung NFL game -- in its inferior second half, anyway -- than a battle between two of the best SEC teams of the past decade. If I'd had a vote, I'd have cast it for Oklahoma State, too. 

But I'm still more excited for Tide-Tigers II than any other game on the bowl slate, because this LSU team is maybe the most compelling, fascinating college football team I can remember watching. They produce fewer yards per-game than 74 other teams in the FBS (including such non-must-see attacks as UCLA's and Virginia's), but they still make for riveting viewing because of the anything-can-happen-at-anytime nature of their games. There's Tyrann Mathieu's game-swinging plays, the terror of Mingo and Montgomery off the edge, Jordan Jefferson's capacity to win or lose any game near-singlehandedly, the phenomenon that is Brad Wing and -- oh yeah -- the mad in-game tactics of Les Freaking Miles. And now this bizarre bayou witch's brew of a team takes on its deadliest rival, again, with the opportunity to become not just national champions but -- given their domination of the SEC, nonconference gauntlet, and potential twin victories over Nick Saban's best Alabama team -- one of the game's greatest champions of the past 25 years. Whether it's the "right" title game matchup or not won't make it any less historic, or thrilling.

As for which game I'm least enthused about, at least Bruins-Illini has Nelson Rosario and Whitney Mercilus going for it. Louisville-N.C. State in the Belk Bowl seems like the most average possible matchup between the most average possible teams in the most average possible BCS leagues; I figure I'll need to average a cup of coffee per quarter to make it to the end. (At least, if Victor Anderson doesn't save me). As for an under-the-radar special, Vanderbilt and Cincinnati both come into the Liberty Bowl with plenty to prove, exciting (and balanced) offenses, and one of the hotter young coaches in the game. Show me two evenly-matched up-and-coming teams at programs where bowl wins are still worth their metaphorical weight in gold, and I'll show you what should be an outstanding contest.
Posted on: December 13, 2011 12:32 pm
Edited on: December 13, 2011 12:41 pm
 

VIDEO: RG3 delivers the Late Show Top Ten

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Robert Griffin III delivering the Late Show Top Ten with David Letterman? Robert Griffin III delivering the Late Show Top Ten with David Letterman, folks:



We think said delivery lags slightly behind his delivery of deep passes to Kendall Wright, but only slightly. And with all due respect to Andrew Luck and Trent Richardson, we're convinced every time a Superman sock-wearing quarterback from Baylor (which is Baylor) strikes the Heisman pose as the Heisman winner on national television, a college football angel gets its wings,
Posted on: December 10, 2011 9:44 pm
 

2011 Heisman Trophy voting numbers breakdown



Posted by Adam Jacobi

On Saturday night, the Heisman Trophy was awarded to Baylor junior quarterback Robert Griffin III. RG3, as he's known to Baylor faithful and now the rest of the nation, collected 405 first-place votes to finish with 1,687 total voting points, well ahead of the runner-up, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. Luck had 247 first-place votes and 1,407 total voting points.

The key to Griffin's victory in the voting was his performance in the South region -- Alabama RB Trent Richardson's home territory -- where RG3 led all contenders with 303 voting points. Richardson was second with 256 points there, and Luck was third with 182 points. That region alone accounted for nearly half of Griffin's margin of victory over Luck, and it helped stave Richardson off as a serious threat to winning the Heisman. Of course, Griffin also cleaned up in his home Southwest region, but it was his ability to win regions that he wasn't the home favorite of that landed RG3 the coveted Heisman.

Here's the final national vote ranking:

  1. Robert Griffin III, Baylor QB: 405 first-place votes, 1,687 total points
  2. Andrew Luck, Stanford QB: 247 first-place votes, 1,407 total points
  3. Trent Richardson, Alabama RB: 138 first-place votes, 978 total points
  4. Montee Ball, Wisconsin RB: 22 first-place votes, 348 total points
  5. Tyrann Mathieu, LSU DB: 34 first-place votes, 327 total points
  6. Matt Barkley, USC QB: 11 first-place votes, 153 total points
  7. Case Keenum, Houston QB: 10 first-place votes, 123 total points
  8. Kellen Moore, Boise State QB: 6 first-place votes, 90 total points
  9. Russell Wilson, Wisconsin QB: 4 first-place votes, 52 total points
  10. LaMichael James, Oregon RB: 5 first-place votes, 48 total points

And here are the regional breakdowns:

FAR WEST (Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

  1. Luck: 315 points
  2. Griffin: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 137 points

MID-ATLANTIC (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia)

  1. Griffin: 254 points
  2. Luck: 248 points
  3. Richardson: 168 points

MIDWEST (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin)

  1. Griffin: 272 points
  2. Luck: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 125 points

NORTHEAST (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont)

  1. Griffin: 257 points
  2. Luck: 254 points
  3. Richardson: 160 points 

SOUTH (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee) 

  1. Griffin: 303 points
  2. Richardson: 256 points
  3. Luck: 182 points

SOUTHWEST (Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas)

  1. Griffin: 381 points
  2. Luck: 188 points
  3. Richardson: 132 points
Posted on: December 9, 2011 2:27 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 2:29 pm
 

Fischer's Heisman vote: RGIII, Luck, Moore



Posted by Bryan Fischer


Earlier this year, I was given the prestigious honor of voting for the Heisman Trophy for the first time. The award's illustrious history of selecting the country's most outstanding player has been well chronicled and I was happy to lend my expertise. As the weeks went by however, it became clear that this would be among the most difficult votes in some time - there was no runaway favorite like Cam Newton this year.

There did seem to be some resolution towards the end of the season but, in talking with other voters, it became clear that there was no easy pick. After sitting down and looking at stats, highlights and other things, who to vote number one became pretty clear. It was spots two and three (you only have three spots on your ballot) that caused me the most angst. Without further ado, my Heisman ballot and why I voted for them.

1. Robert Griffin III, quarterback, Baylor

Like my colleague Bruce Feldman, it's difficult to wrap your head around the fact that a player from Baylor is the most outstanding player in college football. I grew up in Texas and it always seemed the Bears were the ones everybody scheduled for homecoming. Thanks to the Big 12 television deal they were rarely on television unless they were playing a major school. Baylor, for most college football fans across the country, was irrelevant before Griffin burst onto the scene.

During September, the nation was transfixed on what, exactly, RGIII was doing but figured he couldn't keep it up. The first three games he was completing 85% of his passes, had 13 touchdown passes and no picks and flirted with a touchdown-incompletion ratio that was unheard of. The opener against No. 14 TCU was Baylor's first win over a ranked team since 2004 and the signal-caller was the chief reason why. Many expected the close loss to Kansas State to end any hopes of him making it to New York but in the deepest league in the country (sorry SEC fans), Griffin won nine games despite the Bears defense being ranked in the 100's in most major defensive categories. Safe to say that without RGIII, the Bears would have been 3-9.

What sealed the deal for me was the game-winning drive to beat Oklahoma for the first time in school history and an efficient game against what was the 9th-best defense in the country at the time in Texas to end the year. It's rare for any player in the conference to beat both schools but RGIII did accomplish the rare feat. He finished first in the country in passing efficiency with what would be an NCAA record 192.31 rating, edging out Russell Wilson despite attempting 85 more passes. He also finished second in the country in total offense and led the nation in points responsible for.

In January, Griffin was invited to speak at the NCAA convention in San Antonio by new president Mark Emmert. He was lauded for his achievements outside athletics such as getting a degree in three years and beginning his masters' with sights set on law school not his backup plan to the NFL, but his primary one. The attention and applause were genuine on that chilly day at the convention, just as it should be Saturday in New York City when he likely accepts the Heisman Trophy. On and off the field this year, Robert Griffin III was my pick for the most outstanding college football player.

2. Andrew Luck, quarterback, Stanford

He was supposed to be a shoe-in for this award. For most of the year, it looked like he wouldn't lose the Heisman, even if he didn't necessarily win it. I saw Luck up close several times this season and can confirm that he's the best quarterback in college football. He throws on the run better than anybody, his pocket awareness is uncanny, he calls his own plays and - like RGIII - has taken a program lacking success and turned it into a winner.

The Cardinal are 23-2 over the past two seasons and that is almost entirely due to Luck. Unfortunately his worst game of the year came when he needed it most, against Oregon. Even then, he threw for three touchdowns and the team was in things for three quarters. The offense scored fewer than 30 points just once all year - against Notre Dame when they could have topped the mark had they tried - and was more balanced than any other in the country as coaches had no issues sticking to running the ball if it was working.

A lot of people turn the Heisman race into a stats race. Luck's were good (3,170 yards passing, 35 touchdowns, 9 interceptions) but didn't top others. The thing I always kept in mind was what he did given the talent around him. Sure he had a good offensive line, so did Trent Richardson, Montee Ball, Wilson and Griffin. Nobody, however, put up the kind of numbers Luck did throwing to three tight ends who didn't have separation speed and with his best wide receiver sitting on the sidelines the second half of the year. Griffin had the dynamic Kendall Wright, Luck had Griff Whalen. That was a factor in my mind.

By all measures, he was outstanding this season but fell just short of being the most outstanding player in college football. He put up more points against USC in that school's history (against some defensive coordinator name Monte Kiffin) and had he had good defense, might be playing for the national title. He is the only quarterback ever to go undefeated against USC and Notre Dame. Listen to head coach David Shaw state his case for the quarterback and you can't help but consider him worthy of this award. I couldn't put him above RGIII so Luck wound up second on my ballot.

3. Kellen Moore, quarterback, Boise State

For many seeing this, the thought is that I gave Moore the third spot as a career achievement award. I did not.

For most of the week leading up to voting I had a running back (Ball or Richardson) penciled in.  But before I was making my choices I looked again at what the diminutive but excellent quarterback had done this year. Statistically he was great: 300-of-405 passing (74%), 3,507 yards, 41 touchdowns and seven picks. I watched a lot of Boise State games this year (even the blowouts) and know that most of the numbers were accomplished in three quarters or less. A great season was hampered by the loss to TCU but it's safe to say that Moore did all he could game-in and game-out to lead the Broncos to another top 10 ranking.

Moore's best strength this year was spreading the ball around. He lost his two best receivers from last season but didn't lose a step despite several of his young pass catchers dealing with drops from time-to-time. The running game wasn't as good but Moore made up for it through the air. Were it not for a one-point loss to a good team, he'd be in New York this year.

There were three things that caused me to put the quarterback on my ballot ahead of others however. The first was just the way he played. He's good as much as every person in the country likes to knock him for the competition he faces. He'd be the best quarterback in most power conferences, easily, and can drop the ball in on downfield routes perfectly. Second, he became the NCAA's all-time, winningest quarterback at the FBS level. How is that not outstanding? There's no knocking a winner, which Moore rightfully is. Finally, as a starting quarterback Moore has never trailed by more than seven points his entire career. Never. The combined margin of defeat in his three losses total is just five points. Those are just jaw-dropping stats and a measure of someone who not only starts good but doesn't panic if put into a difficult situation.

Moore was great this season and if you sort through it all, you'd see that too.

Why I didn't vote for them (in the order I would have)

Montee Ball, running back, Wisconsin: Ball was on my ballot for the stretch run but fell just short after considering Moore. He led the country in rushing with 1,759 yards and in scoring with 17.54 points per game. His 38 touchdowns is just one shy of Barry Sanders' record and more than 45 entire teams. It hurt that Russell Wilson was the man Wisconsin picked to campaign for earlier in the year but Ball without a doubt had a season to remember and was an outstanding college football player in 2011.

Matt Barkley, quarterback, USC: I wanted to put Barkley in my top three because he has not only been outstanding on the field leading USC back to the top 10, but he has been the face of the program that was put through the ringer. He set a school and conference record for touchdown passes in a season and tossed six TDs in a game twice. It was a season for the ages but he was hampered by a very slow start to the year, the Arizona State game and the head-to-head loss to Luck.

Trent Richardson, running back, Alabama: He was the best offensive player in the SEC and a great player who I'd want on my team in a heartbeat but I didn't think Richardson was the best running back in the country. He played only four games against schools with a winning record and faced just two defenses ranked in the top 40 against the rush. 46% of his yards came against North Texas, Ole Miss, Georgia Southern and Auburn and nearly the same percentage of his touchdowns came against those four defensive powerhouses. I get that he was hurt at times and shared carries; Richardson is a great player but just wasn't the best this season.

Tyrann Mathieu, cornerback, LSU: I love the Honey Badger - he's a game changer unlike any other in the way he forces turnovers and returns kicks. That said, he wasn't the most outstanding player on his own team (punter Brad Wing was) and wasn't even the best player in the secondary (Morris Claiborne was). His coverage skills were solid but not spectacular and had he not had two big games against Arkansas and Georgia to end the season, wouldn't have been invited to New York. The suspension during the season also played a factor.

Others under consideration: Case Keenum, Houston; LaMichael James, Oregon; Brandon Weeden, Oklahoma State.

Posted on: December 9, 2011 11:54 am
Edited on: December 16, 2011 11:18 am
 

PODCAST: All-Americans and Best/Worst Bowls

Posted by Chip Patterson

The time between the final conference championship games and the opening of the postseason is filled with honoring the performances of the year and previewing the bowl games ahead. CBSSports.com's Eye on College Football Blogger Bryan Fischer sits down with Adam Aizer to break down the CBSSports.com All-American teams. The two discuss some of the most heated positions on the list, like whether or not Tryann Mathieu should have gotten the First Team nod as a punt returner.

As the mind behind CBSSports.com's Eye on Recruiting, Bryan also explains the reasoning behind the Freshman All-American squad. Finally, the pair take some time to preview the bowl schedule. Which games they can't wait to see, and which games they can't wait to see end.

[Click here to check out the CBSSports.com All-American Teams and the Freshman All-American team]


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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com