Tag:Bill Byrne
Posted on: August 4, 2011 4:30 pm
Edited on: August 4, 2011 4:31 pm
 

Future programs of the Longhorn Network

Posted by Tom Fornelli

On Thursday the new and controversial Longhorn Network announced a slate of programming that it will begin airing in the coming weeks. On the whole there's nothing all that groundbreaking in the lineup. There will be a show in which Mack Brown talks with Vince Young, Ricky Williams and Colt McCoy. There's also a look back at the 2005 national championship season, and your standard greatest games fare.

Being the visionary that I am, however, I decided to take a peak into my crystal ball to get a glimpse at what the Longhorn Network will be showing a little over a year from now. Let me tell you, there's going to be some must-see television going on.

High School Football - It's just like Friday Night Lights, except without a script, Connie Britton and every game ending on an unrealistic, last-second touchdown. What it will have, though, is plenty of Texas recruits.

The Departure - A five-part documentary series highlighting all the comings and goings in College Station as Texas A&M packs its bags and moves to the SEC.  You won't want to miss the episode where DeLoss Dodds and Bill Byrne run into each other at a local grocery store and let the expletives and produce fly.

Crying All Night with Don Beebe - A late night talk show that is shown every weeknight in which Don Beebe sits behind a desk and cries as his conference dissolves around him. His co-host DeLoss Dodds then consoles him while interviewing special guests!

Mack Daddy - Have you ever seen some of the lovely co-eds who call beautiful Austin, Texas home? Well now you have the chance to date them! Join Texas head coach Mack Brown as he hosts a game show that is a cross between The Match Game and Flavor of Love!

Major's Malfunctions - A refreshing family sitcom starring Texas co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite. While Major has his problems with Garrett Gilbert at work, the trouble doesn't really start until he returns home to his sassy wife and two small children!

Aggie Rehab - Hosted by Dr. Drew, former Texas A&M fans move into a house where together they all try and overcome their love of Texas A&M and turn their lives around. Incredibly moving, sad and uplifting all at the same time.

Call your cable operators now!
Posted on: July 22, 2011 4:04 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:08 pm
 

Mike Sherman gets a contract extension

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While we don't really know what to think of the future of the Texas A&M football program as far as where it will be playing its football in the coming years, we do know something about what tomorrow holds for the Aggies. Wherever the school ends up playing, it's likely Mike Sherman will be there.

The school announced on Friday that it had given Mike Sherman a contract extension along with a $400,000 pay raise. The extension adds one year to the four years remaining on Sherman's current deal, and bumps his pay up to $2.2 million annually, which makes him the fourth-highest paid coach in the Big 12.

“Coach Sherman has done an outstanding job of directing our football program and is one of the top football coaches in the country,” A&M athletic director Bill Byrne said in a statement. “Not only has our team improved on the field, but under Coach Sherman’s direction the overall football team has embraced the values and virtues of Texas A&M University.” 

Through three seasons in College Station Sherman's record is the epitome of mediocrity, as the Aggies have gone 19-19 in that time, but they are coming off of a 9-4 season and an appearance in the Cotton Bowl. It's also possible that the team will start the season ranked in the top ten, and is considered to be one of the favorites in the Big 12 this season. 

Posted on: July 21, 2011 8:35 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 10:55 pm
 

Texas A&M AD releases Longhorn Network statement

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Concerns about the Longhorn Network were made official today, what with Dan Beebe addressing them in a statement earlier Thursday. The Longhorn Network was set to air two Texas football games -- including a conference game -- and had made plans to televise high school football games involving Texas recruits, even before the NCAA could make a ruling on its permissibility one way or the other. Fortunately for the rest of the conference, Beebe put the kibosh on that idea Thursday.

Still, that wasn't in time to stop a meeting by the Texas A&M Regents on the issue, and now Texas A&M athletic director Bill Byrne has become the first administrator to make his thoughts on the network public, in the somewhat ominous statement issued Thursday. The statement is reprinted in full below.

I have continued to have concerns about the Longhorn Network since the original announcement by ESPN and Texas. Since last summer, the Big 12 member institutions have committed to work together in a spirit of unity and equality. Recent news reports concerning this network; however, have created a considerable amount of uncertainty.

We had an agreement in place that Big 12 members would have the right to one non-conference football game and four to six basketball games for third tier, or institutional rights. The concept of the Longhorn Network broadcasting two live football games—with one of these being a conference game—had not been discussed among the Big 12 athletic directors.

Our concerns were heightened further when news reports surfaced that the Longhorn Network would be broadcasting high school football games featuring Texas high school recruits, including recruits living outside the state of Texas. Knowing how restrictive NCAA rules are regarding any collegiate representative contacting prospects, we contacted the NCAA for an interpretation. We are still waiting for the NCAA’s response.

I have continued to communicate our concerns to the conference office and my fellow athletic directors. We are pleased that the Commissioner has started to address these concerns, but many questions remain. These are significant issues for all of collegiate athletics as they relate to broadcast rights, revenue distribution and the recruitment of student-athletes.

Obviously, there's more than a little lingering dissatisfaction here, and if Texas and its new network don't address them to Texas A&M's satisfaction -- which might be asking a lot, considering we're talking about rivals with a very divergent set of opinions on what constitutes an optimal deal -- that could spell disaster for the conference's already teetering stability.

Still, it's also unfair to say that Beebe has merely "started to address" these things. He has already said that, until further notice, Texas can't show high school games on the Longhorn Network or televise more than one game on it, and those rules will go for any other school's network if/when they start up. That is as fully addressed as those concerns can be at this point, is it not?

And still, Texas A&M may continue to claim uncertainty, since Beebe left the door open for those things (but only with the other conference members' approval, and that ain't exactly happening anytime soon). And in these types of situations, "uncertainty" is really just an acceptable way of saying "political cover for acting more selfishly." So this is all music to the SEC's ears, if they want the Aggies or anybody else feeling a little more disloyal to the Big 12 these days.


Posted on: September 1, 2010 12:14 pm
Edited on: September 1, 2010 2:50 pm
 

Texas A&M AD scared of SEC competition?

Posted by Chip Patterson

Okay, so maybe that headline is a little bit unfair.  But it's not far from what Texas A&M athletic director Bill Byrne said when he was a guest on "Aggie Hour," a weekly radio show on the Aggie Radio Network, earlier this week.

Byrne was candid about several topics, one of which being why the Aggies decided to maintain a holding pattern when given a potential opportunity to move to the SEC earlier in the summer.

"I was concerned with changing conferences that we may not be ready for the level of competition if we decided to leave," Byrne told host Dave South on the weekly show that's part of the Aggie Radio Network. "I was very concerned about trying to take things slowly, and not rush."
Despite being one of the most storied programs in college football history, the Big 12 has not treated the Aggies very well - particularly in football.  The Aggies have not had a conference title since 1998 and haven't finished the season in the Top 25 since 1999.

Obviously the Aggies hope that this season can be the end of at least one of those streaks, and if it's going to happen it will be on the legs and arms of Jerrod Johnson.  The senior quarterback threw for 3579 yards and 30 touchdowns and only 8 interceptions, and will be counted on to do the same and more in 2010.  The Aggies are currently sitting on the outside of the Top 25, but with a schedule that kicks off with Stephen F. Austin, Louisiana Tech, and Florida International; they should have some time to work out any kinks before kicking off conference play.       


 
 
 
 
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