Tag:Bryan Fischer
Posted on: February 8, 2012 7:51 pm
Edited on: February 8, 2012 7:57 pm
 

Texas A&M adds Louisiana Tech as 2012 opener

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Texas A&M's move to the SEC has forced a few alterations to their 2012 schedule and it appears the Aggies are going about changing it in a very un-SEC fashion: scheduling harder.

Instead of opening the upcoming season with McNeese State, A&M will now be headed to Shreveport, La. to take on Louisiana Tech, Aggies athletic director Bill Byrne wrote on his blog Wednesday.
"We’re trying to have no more than one Div. 1-AA or FCS team on our schedule, but we may end up having to schedule two. Making this switch was the only way to work it out with Louisiana Tech. It was reported earlier this week that I had conversations with Florida State about being a part of our schedule. They needed a game after West Virginiadropped from their schedule. We tried to make it work, but couldn’t.

Our options were limited due to conference realignment. We expect the scheduling process to go much smoother in the future."

The Bulldogs will likely be the favorite in the WAC as they return 16 starters from a successful 2011 season that saw the program win the conference and narrowly lose to TCU in the Poinsettia Bowl. The opener for both teams will also move to Thursday, August 30 and Louisiana Tech will return to Kyle Field in 2016. A $200,000 buyout will be paid to McNeese State to get out of the contract.

Because of conference realignment, the school had been looking for two non-conference games and still have an open spot for the weekend of November 17. Texas A&M's home opener will double as their SEC introduction on September 8, when they host Florida. Byrne also remarked that there was no update regarding the location of the game with Arkansas, which had previously been a non-conference tilt at Cowboys Stadium but was expected to be changed to a home-and-home between the two schools. A&M will also host South Carolina State on September 22nd.

The Aggies will officially join the SEC on July 1, 2012 after wrapping up play in the Big 12 with a 7-6 season in 2011 that was capped with a win in the Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas.

Want more Texas A&M football? Follow our CBSSports.com RapidReports for up-to-the-minute news and analysis. 

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 9:27 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 9:31 pm
 

USC WR coach Gilmore headed to Oakland

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Just a few days after losing linebackers coach Joe Barry to the NFL, USC is down another staff member after wide receiver Ted Gilmore accepted the same position with the Oakland Raiders, a source told CBSSports.com.

Gilmore, 44, came to USC just a year ago from Nebraska, where he spent six years coaching receivers and four holding the role of recruiting coordinator.

A Wichita, Kansas native, Gilmore played his college ball at Wyoming before starting his coaching career as a graduate assistant there. He also had stops at Kansas, Houston, Purdue and Colorado before his stint at Nebraksa.

Under Gilmore, USC's receiving corps had a breakout year in 2011. Sophomore Robert Woods developed into a Biletnikoff Award finalist and teammate Marqise Lee was named a Freshman All-American. Whoever takes Gilmore's spot will not only have those two to work with but former prep All-American George Farmer and incoming five-star athlete Nelson Agholor.

Head coach Lane Kiffin, in addition to Gilmore and Barry's spots, is also looking for a defensive backs coach. The Trojans' Spring practice starts in just four weeks as the team likely heads into 2012 as a pre-season top two team.

The Raiders are becoming familiar with poaching Pac-12 assistants having hired former Stanford defensive coordinator Jason Tarver on Monday.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 5:12 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 9:32 pm
 

Mike Leach dismisses linebacker C.J. Mizell

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Mike Leach knows he's got a rebuilding job to do on the Palouse but that doesn't mean team discipline will take a back seat in his quest to lead the program back to glory. The head coach announced on Tuesday that linebacker C.J. Mizell was no longer with the Washington State football team following his arrest over the weekend after his involvement in a fight at a fraternity house.

Mizell started nine games last season as a true freshman and was fourth on the team after racking up 56 tackles and three sacks. Local police say Mizell tried to enter a party at a frat house and was denied entry. He reportedly punched one of the members and fled the scene before later being arrested on misdemeanor charges of assault and trespassing.

The Tallahassee, Fla. native was expected to start this season and be a key contributor for a Cougars defense that has struggled to stop opponents. Leach however, has apparently drawn a line in the sand when it comes to discipline and Mizell was the first to fully understand what it meant.

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Posted on: February 6, 2012 1:54 pm
Edited on: February 6, 2012 2:07 pm
 

Pac-12 makes changes to neutral site scheduling

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The Pac-12's continuing push into the media business with an upcoming conference network and digital platform will have a lasting effect on member schools' football schedules. According to the league's updated executive regulations, non-conference neutral site football games will no longer be permitted unless the conference gets their cut of the media rights:
No member institution shall enter into an agreement to play a neutral-site football game (except in circumstances where such neutral-site game is the away leg of a home-and-home series) unless such agreement provides the Conference with the exclusive broadcast rights and digital rights in all media, and copyright to such neutral-site game.
The move would essentially prohibit schools from scheduling games like last season's LSU-Oregon matchup at Cowboy Stadium in Dallas. Cases such as the upcoming USC-Syracuse game on September 8, 2012 at Met Life Stadium would be permissible because they are the Pac-12 team's away game in a home-and-home series while matchups like the UCLA-Texas game in 2014 would no longer be allowed unless the Longhorns agreed to come to Los Angeles.

Commissioner Larry Scott, whose contract was recently extended, has strived to keep a significant and meaningful portion of inventory for the Pac-12 Network in order to drive distribution with cable and satellite operators. The Pac-12 recently announced a scheduling agreement with the Big Ten that would strengthen the bond between the two leagues but would take away one non-conference game away from members. The combination of moves over the past two years appear to give the conference office a greater element of control over schools' schedules going forward.

USC-Alabama? Oklahoma-Oregon? With the Pac-12's new restrictions, it appears any chance such games happening as big neutral site games are no longer an option unless teams agree to come West.

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Posted on: February 2, 2012 1:26 pm
Edited on: February 2, 2012 1:43 pm
 

PODCAST: Signing Day Recap

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Signing Day has come and gone, and if you were acting foolishly on Wednesday and not following along with all the major happenings of the day on Wednesday along with us, well, you should be ashamed of yourself. Luckily for you, we are a forgiving people here at CBSSports.com, so we've got your back.

On the latest episode of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast, Adam Aizer is joined by our own Bryan Fischer to recap what you missed. They go over the best and worst classes in each conference, discuss oversigning, and talk about why Boise State doesn't fare better in recruiting rankings. All that and more, so give it a listen and get yourself up to speed.

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.


You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.

Posted on: January 26, 2012 3:53 pm
 

PODCAST: Recruiting Update

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We are less than a week away from national signing day. That one day a year where 18-year old high school kids become the most important people in the college football world as they officially sign their letters of intent to attend the school of their choice. So in the latest episode of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast, we bring you up to speed on what you may have missed and what you should expect next week.

Our own Bryan Fischer joins Adam Aizer to talk about the top classes and players in the country, about the recruiting Urban Meyer has already done now that he's at Ohio State, and whether or not Florida State is on the verge of losing a key quarterback recruit to Alabama. All that and even more.

So be sure to check out the podcast below, and while you're at it, head over to our Eye on Recruiting blog to make sure you stay updated on all the latest developments.

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.


You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.



Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview.

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Posted on: January 17, 2012 3:56 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2012 3:59 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model



Posted by Bryan Fischer


Scandals, scholarships and rules changes were among the topics of frequent conversation at last week's NCAA Convention and while not everything president Mark Emmert wanted - the $2,000 cost of attendance stipend for example - was passed by the Legislative Council and Board of Directors, it's safe to say what happened in Indianapolis laid the ground work for significant changes that will impact schools for decades to come.

While details on most proposals from Presidential Working Groups finally emerged in some areas, the one place where there was plenty of talk but little substance was the new enforcement model that some in the organization have been tasked with reforming. After a year that included news about major infractions at Tennessee, Miami, Ohio State, North Carolina and others, it's no surprise that this would be one area of emphasis.

"We were damn mad and not going to take it anymore," Ed Ray, Oregon State president and chair of the Enforcement Working Group, said.

The Enforcement Working Group that came out of August's presidential retreat was tasked with creating a tiered violation structure, new penalty procedures, a reformed process for adjudication and a reformed process that is fair while supporting the collegiate model the organization is looking to uphold.

"In terms of what is our charge, we heard President Emmert talk about this risk-reward analysis and the fact that there seems to be a general loss of integrity and upholding the rules," Vice President for Enforcement Julie Roe Lach said. "This isn't purely a reactive move, we're not just doing this because of the scandals or if there is a crisis. We're doing this because it's the right thing to do. This is a time to redefine what are our principles and what do we stand for."

In addition to following the principles of fairness, accountability and process integrity, flexibility is one of the key things the new model is designed to address as there are currently only two categories of violations: major and secondary. The new model would have four levels (most egregious, serious, secondary, minor) with the Committee on Infractions taking into account various mitigating or aggravating factors that would then help determine penalties. While many believe the enforcement side just makes it up as they go along (and they can because they don't follow past precedent), the model should help move cases along in the system quicker and result in more consistency among penalties given out to schools.

"The working group recognizes the wide-spread perception that the current penalty model leads to inconsistent and insufficient penalties and does not adequately deter other institutions and individuals from engaging in conduct contrary to the rules," the working group's report stated. "The working group believes that the severity of the penalty imposed must correspond with the significance of the rule violation(s)."

If it all seems a bit dense and hard to understand, it is. That's why the NCAA created this proposed penalty matrix that gives you a better visual idea of what future programs will have to get used to if they break rules. For example, if you commit a serious Level I offense and there were no mitigating factors, you can expect a 2-3 year postseason ban.

"We haven't had a lot of pushback on this," Roe Lach said of the new multi-level structure. "If there's anything in the package that is a no-brainer, it seems like this may be it.

"An issue we've heard is we need to be more consistent and allow for more predictability. I think if we are more consistent, it would afford more predictability. The idea is to move toward a penalty guidelines model."

So how does it really work? Well, take the infamous USC case involving Reggie Bush and O.J. Mayo among others: violations of NCAA bylaws governing amateurism; failure to report knowledge of violations; unethical conduct; violations of coaching staff limitations; impermissible recruiting contacts by a representative of the institution's athletics interests; impermissible inducements and extra benefits; and lack of institutional control.  

According to the new model, this would be classified as multiple Level I violations with four significant aggravating factors. Here's a comparison of penalties with what the Trojans got and what they would have received under the new model:



So yes, USC would have been punished even worse under the new proposed enforcement model coming from the NCAA. That's interesting because athletic director Pat Haden is on the enforcement working group and has made it a point to say that the Trojans were unfairly punished. In other examples provided by the NCAA, Baylor's basketball program would have seen the number of scholarships available slashed in half following the school's 2005 infractions case. Instead of fewer practice hours for Rich Rodriguez and Michigan in their case, the Wolverines could have lost up to four scholarships per year. Florida State's 2009 case could have seen football scholarship losses of 10-21 per year for three years instead of the six they received.

Given the new model, expect the hammer from Indianapolis to come down harder on cheaters in the future.

Posted on: January 16, 2012 3:24 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2012 5:12 pm
 

Washington adds Cal's Tosh Lupoi to staff

Posted by Chip Patterson

Washington head coach Steve Sarkisian sought to improve his defense over the offseason, and on Monday announced a new addition to the coaching staff that could bring much more than just first-hand Pac-12 experience. After spending four years as Cal's defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator, Tosh Lupoi has been named defensive line coach and defensive run game coordinator at Washington.

“Coach Lupoi is a terrific young coach and a dynamic recruiter,” Sarkisian said in the school's release. “He will have an immediate impact with our team both on the field and in recruiting.”

This will be Lupoi's first move from Berkley since arriving as a freshman defensive lineman in 2000. After finishing his career with the Golden Bears in 2005, Lupoi spent two seasons as a graduate assistant before taking over as defensive line coach. In the last two seasons Cal has led the Pac-12 in total defense, but Lupoi's most impressive credentials have come from his efforts on the recruiting trail.

Lupoi was named the 2010 Rivals Recruiter of the Year, and each of the last two signing classes have ranked in the Top 15 according to most prominent scouting services. Cal's current crop of 2012 recruits ranks No. 9 on MaxPreps's recent ranking of the Top 25 classes.  CBSSports.com's Bryan Fischer writes that Lupoi's addition "will undoubtedly impact both Washington and Cal's recruiting classes this year and in the future."

Don't think this will have an effect on Pac-12 recruiting? Current Cal verbal commit Shaq Thompson (MaxPreps No. 5 overall prospect) offered the following after Lupoi's move became official:



For much more on the impact of Lupoi's addition to Washington's recruiting, check out Bryan Fischer and the Eye On Recruiting.  

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com