Tag:Butch Davis
Posted on: July 13, 2011 11:09 am
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:27 pm
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Michael McAdoo hearing rescheduled in NCAA suit

Posted by Chip Patterson

Originally scheduled for this Friday, Michael McAdoo's hearing in Durham County Court has been rescheduled to Wednesday. On July 1, McAdoo filed a lawsuit against North Carolina and the NCAA seeking reinstatement after being ruled permanently ineligible by the NCAA.

McAdoo's argument is that the crimes he has been charged with do not fit the punishment of permanent ineligibility. He was found guilty by the NCAA of receiving improper assistance on multiple occasions over several terms. His lawyers argue that McAdoo has already served the punishment issued by the school's Honor Court. After sitting out all of the 2010 season (13 games) and working his way back into good standing academically, the former Tar Heel believes he belongs back on the field.

If McAdoo wins the case, he would have one final year left with the Tar Heels - unless he decides to transfer.
Posted on: July 5, 2011 3:18 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 3:35 pm
 

Former UNC DE McAdoo suing school, NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Ruled permanently ineligible last November, former North Carolina defensive end Michael McAdoo has filed a lawsuit against the school and NCAA seeking his reinstatement.

McAdoo's ineligibility is tied to the academic-related allegations against the North Carolina football program. He was one of the 13 players who missed the season opener against LSU and remained on the sidelines awaiting word from the school or NCAA until he was ruled ineligible near the end of the season.

More on the suit from McAdoo's lawyer, via InsideCarolina.com
“All told, McAdoo has been declared permanently ineligible to play intercollegiate athletics because he received $110 in improper benefits (which he has since paid to charity), and because his university-assigned and trained tutor provided McAdoo with too much assistance in formatting his citations and ‘works cited’ page on his paper for one class in the summer of 2009. This punishment is grossly disproportionate to the facts of McAdoo’s case, and is inconsistent with the NCAA’s own guidelines and the punishments meted out by the NCAA in other cases with similar facts.”
McAdoo was ruled ineligible at the same time as fullback Devon Ramsay. Ramsay was able to win his appeal with the NCAA in February; McAdoo's was denied.

When McAdoo's appeal was denied, athletic director Dick Baddour called the decision "unfair." The argument around Chapel Hill is that sitting out all of 2010, in addition to punishment issued from the university, should suffice as proper punishment for his academic misconduct.

Whether McAdoo ever wants to play another down for the Tar Heels could be debated, but regaining his eligibility in the eyes of the NCAA is clearly a top priority. After a promising sophomore season, he entered 2010 ready to compete for a starting spot on the defensive line. If the 6-foot-7, 245 pound pass rusher is still in top shape, he could be a great addition to any program.

Seeking reinstatement from the NCAA could be his way to re-enter the competition for snaps in Chapel Hill or the first step in taking his talents elsewhere.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 3:46 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2012 4:34 pm
 

The ACC's possible 'hot seats' of the future

Posted by Chip Patterson

Dennis Dodd unveiled his 2011 Hot Seat Ratings for college football, and for the most part the ACC coaching picture appears to be somewhat stable heading into the fall. Obviously any new developments in North Carolina's NCAA case would change the hot seat rating of Butch Davis.

The ACC has some fresh faces (Maryland's Randy Edsall, Miami's Al Golden, Florida State's Jimbo Fisher, Virginia's Mike London), and some deeply rooted coaches like Virginia Tech's Frank Beamer, Georgia Tech's Paul Johnson, and Wake Forest's Jim Grobe. But in between the newbies and the veterans are four coaches who could feel the seat heating up in the near future.

BUTCH DAVIS: North Carolina, hired before 2007 season - Well after the resignation of John Blake, Davis announced his regret for hiring his long-time friend and now-revealed runner. Many people believe that Davis' time at North Carolina should come to a close for allowing all of the well-documented wrongdoing to take place under his watch. But the fact is that the school has stood behind Davis, and as of right now the NCAA is not holding him personally responsible. However, should further information indict Davis things could be different. Additionally, if the Committee on Infractions hits the program with serious sanctions it will become more difficult for supporters to stand behind Davis. Coming off of his first bowl win since arriving in Chapel Hill, Davis needs to make sure the on-field successes are overshadowing the off-field chatter in order to keep some sort of job security.

TOM O'BRIEN: N.C. State, hired before 2007 season - After choosing to join the Colorado Rockies' organization instead of spending his spring with the N.C. State football team, Russell Wilson was told by head coach Tom O'Brien that the starting quarterback role was a 365 day/year type job. O'Brien believed that if Wilson was going to be the starting quarterback in the fall, he needed to participate in spring practice - something Wilson had missed every season due to Wolfpack baseball. So when Wilson returned to O'Brien, the former Marine stood by his word, declaring junior Mike Glennon as the starting quarterback for 2011. Wilson thanked his fans, was released from his scholarship, and is currently deciding if (and where) he wants to play football in the fall.

O'Brien's future at N.C. State from a hot seat perspective is not reliant entirely upon whether Glennon turns out to be a premier quarterback, but it is certainly a contributing factor. 2010 marked O'Brien's first winning season at N.C. State, and Wilson was a big part the Wolfpack's success. If Wilson succeeds in the national spotlight somewhere like Wisconsin, the fans in Raleigh will grow frustrated with O'Brien if Glennon is less than satisfactory. At Boston College it took O'Brien a few seasons to get things going in the right direction (six straight bowl victories), but that waiting period will expire soon for many N.C. State fans.

DABO SWINNEY: Clemson, promoted during 2008 season - Of all the coaches grouped into this category, Swinney has had the least amount of time as the head of the program. But, Swinney's midseason promotion to interim head coach in the 2008 season will always serve as a disadvantage in the eyes of the Clemson faithful. Don't get me wrong, the Tigers love them some Dabo. He carries a great reputation as a recruiter, and he has continued that trend delivering nationally ranked classes since being promoted. But especially after Clemson's 6-7 performance in 2010, there is beginning to be some doubt if Swinney is the right man for the job. He acted quickly after the season ended, shaking up the assistant coaches and bringing in Tulsa offensive coordinator Chad Morris to improve a struggling unit. If the change to the other positions on the staff don't lead to an improvement in the "wins" column, fans will turn their attention to Swinney. With Tommy Bowden's resignation, the Tigers never got a chance to really hold a coaching search or pick "their guy." Swinney will be "Bowden's guy," unless he takes these top ranked recruiting classes and turns them into top ranked teams in the near future.

DAVID CUTCLIFFE: Duke, hired before 2008 season - With 12 victories in his first three seasons, Cutcliffe has already doubled the amount of wins that prior head coach Ted Roof collected in more than four years. Bringing in the man known for mentoring some of the game's best quarterbacks was a big-time move with hopes to bring the Blue Devils at least to a point of mediocrity. In 2009, Cutcliffe got Duke within two games of bowl eligibility - which would basically be Duke's version of the Super Bowl.

Cutcliffe has brought some excitement back to football in Durham, but his seat could get much hotter in the coming seasons if Duke continues to fall short of breaking through. I realize that is a difficult expectation for a program that hasn't seen the postseason since 1995, but there is only so much losing a fan base can sit through these days without demanding a change.

Here is the full breakdown of ACC coaches from Dennis Dodd's Hot Seat Ratings:

Boston College

Frank Spaziani

1.5

Clemson

Dabo Swinney

2.5

Duke

David Cutcliffe

2.5

Florida State

Jimbo Fisher

0.5

Georgia Tech

Paul Johnson

1.0

Maryland

Randy Edsall

2.0

Miami (Fla.)

Al Golden

1.5

North Carolina

Butch Davis

3.0

NC State

Tom O'Brien

2.0

Virginia

Mike London

1.5

Virginia Tech

Frank Beamer

0.0

Wake Forest

Jim Grobe

1.5


KEY: Ratings go from 0-5, with 0 being "can't be touched" and 5 being "on the hot seat, time to win now"



Posted on: June 23, 2011 1:53 am
Edited on: June 23, 2011 10:29 pm
 

Ex-USC WR White admits taking illegal money

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Lonnie White, a former USC wide receiver and kick returner, wrote at TheDaily.com on Thursday that he frequently received large sums of money while he was playing for the Trojans in the mid-'80s. White, whose name is probably more familiar to California residents as a longtime Los Angeles Times writer (a skill on display in his article here), said he received a total $14,000 in illegal payments. He detailed one $5,000 transaction, saying he waited in "an empty lot ... sitting alone in a parked car late at night" and that he was given a "small brown bag filled with money."

That part in and of itself is a bit troubling, but not entirely surprising; the big thing there is that there's someone willing to put their name to it (and under no pressure to do so) instead of it being the stuff of rumor or allegation. No, the real key to White's story is that according to him, this type of behavior was commonplace across generations -- and he has his family to back him up. White's father Elwood told him such bending of the rules was prevalent at Morgan State as far back as the late '40s, and White's older brother Tim also played for USC's football team and introduced him to their "money man" in Lonnie's first year on campus:

We would use the meeting as a joyous occasion, but for most of my freshman year, I didn’t exactly know how the process worked. This was before cell phones, and my brother kept me in the dark when it came to details. I just remember taking a variety of items, from signed footballs to player-issued season tickets, to our benefits source in exchange for money, usually cash.

Even though I knew what I was doing was wrong, it seemed like everyone I knew who played college football enjoyed some type of extra benefits as a player.

Fortunately for USC, this story isn't going to lead to NCAA investigators hounding the White family and the USC athletic department for details. The statute of limitations for NCAA violations (absent a continuing pattern of repeat violations) is four years, so unless the NCAA finds a pattern of misbehavior going back 25 years, this is irrelevant to their current casework -- and let's be honest, if the NCAA finds that type of historical rule-breaking with USC, that program is getting nuked regardless of what White says.

Also, the Trojan athletic department and coaches, which White doesn't implicate, would catch the most heat in situations like these. Here's what White had to say about why the coaching staff doesn't merit criticism in this instance:

It must be noted that all this went on without the coaches’ knowledge. That seems hard to believe. It is true, though. At major programs, the pressure to win and the time commitment the coaches put forth toward the program itself leaves major opportunities for players to interact with people who have a different agenda.

That's a valid and underreported point. When North Carolina head coach Butch Davis tells NCAA investigators that he had no idea John Blake was a prolific runner for Gary Wichard while coaching for the Tar Heels at the same time, he probably meant it ... and the NCAA (no shrinking violet when it comes to sanctions, as USC can attest) clearly believed him, opting not to hit UNC with the dreaded Lack Of Institutional Control in its notice of allegations earlier this week.

At the same time, though, Davis did get a Failure To Monitor charge, which is still pretty bad, and ignorance is hardly a valid defense for coaches. White closes out his piece by noting that he knows at least five BCS-level players from last season who believe that the impermissible benefit problem is much larger than is being reported. That's probably because the coaches, by and large, still don't know when it's going on.

The worst part is, this will go on forever. It's an inevitable result of trying to instill and enforce a code of strict amateurism in a capitalist society. You can't get people to stop wanting money, and the stricter the consequences are, the greater lengths the athletes will go to to conceal the activity. Hence Lonnie White, sitting in an empty lot late at night, trading season tickets for a bag of money. Basic capitalism turned into an act of shame. That's obviously not the NCAA's stated goal, but it's the clear end result.

Doesn't seem right, does it?


Posted on: June 22, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:56 pm
 

PODCAST: Talking UNC Notice of Allegations

Posted by Chip Patterson

Earlier today, I hopped on the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast with Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst to talk a little UNC Notice of Allegations.

"Should Butch Davis be fired?" That's the question being asked by many people after scanning the collection of charges detailed in the 42-page report from the NCAA. In reality, there was very little in the notice that was not already known thanks to some aggressive reporting by both national and local media. But the report does bring together a year of investigations into potentially major violations in several different categories involving a fair share of the most notable names on the roster.

So yes, it does look bad. On the surface, it looks very bad.

But the picture that has been painted for the NCAA by North Carolina is one of an institution struggling to deal with "rogue" members. Since John Blake did not tell UNC about the money from Gary Wichard, and Jennifer Wiley continued to provide services after no longer being employed by the school; North Carolina (and more importantly Butch Davis) can say they are sorry and try to cooperate. In fact, it is their cooperation which the institution will argue demonstrates the feeling of responsibility among those in oversight of the program.

Many people would argue that Davis, who has known Blake for "at least 30 years," should have known his reputation around coaching circles. It will be argued for years to come, that no matter what the NCAA can or cannot prove: Davis knew what Blake and Wiley were doing.

But as of Tuesday, it does not appear that the NCAA is prepared to allege wrongdoing directly against Butch Davis. Enraged fans will scream that Davis is guilty, and demand what they consider "justice." But the NCAA, similar to our own justice system, does not act based on assumption or reputation. With no evidence, it cannot be proven that Davis knew of any wrongdoing during which he did not act on as a head coach.

As you'll hear in the podcast below, a decision was made when the NCAA set foot on campus. North Carolina either had to jump ship and get rid of Davis when the scandal broke, or ride out the storm with him at the helm. If Davis has made it this long, there will be no changes to his employment AT LEAST until this process is complete.

Okay, after all that serious talk I should probably warn you that we also discuss Mascots, Adam's plan for Wolvie the Wolverine, and my early crush on college cheerleaders.


Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:43 pm
 

UNC releases statements following NOA

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As Chip reported about here on the blog earlier on Tuesday night, North Carolina was hit with a Notice of Allegations from the NCAA. You can read all about it here, but following the notice the school released statements of its own.

From Chancellor Holden Thorp:

"I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position. We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football."

Athletic Director Dick Baddour:

"We are disappointed to be in this position because it goes against everything we believe in, but we are thankful to get to the next step in the process. These are the issues that we have been dealing with since last summer. We will gather the information the NCAA has requested and prepare to address the notice with the NCAA in the fall. We have a strong staff that will help get us through this and put us in a position where we will be a better athletic department as a result. Our fans have been through a lot this past year, and we appreciate their continued patience and support as we work through these next steps with the NCAA."

Head coach Butch Davis:

"I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch. I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously.

"I want to thank our fans for the tremendous support we have received. Their loyalty and support has been especially appreciated by our student-athletes. The opportunity I have to serve the University of North Carolina is one that I cherish, and I will continue to focus on improving every aspect of our football program."

North Carolina will appear before the Committee on Infractions in Indianapolis on October 28th. 

Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:13 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:57 pm
 

UNC receives Notice of Allegations from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

In June 2010 the NCAA began to investigate the North Carolina football program in regards to possible violations regarding players receiving impermissible benefits. After a tumultuous season that saw 14 players miss at least one game (with seven missing the entire season), the first steps of closure can begin with this multi-pronged investigation into the North Carolina football program.

The official Notice of Allegations (you can see the full letter here on TarHeelBlue.com), includes nine different allegations.

Three (3) of the allegations are against former North Carolina assistant coach John Blake:

- Unethical conduct for providing false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution and for failure to cooperate with the investigation.
- Blake marketed athletic abilities of student-athletes to agent Gary Wichard
- Blake received outside income that he did not report to the institution

Two (2) of the allegations are against former North Carolina tutor Jennifer Wiley:

- Unethical conduct for refusing to provide information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution
- Wiley provided extra benefits to student-athletes in the form of ravel and parking expenses, and tutoring.

The rest of the allegations: - Allegations of fraud against student-athletes and the tutor
- Allegations that student-athletes received preferential treatment and accepted impermissible benefits
- Allegations against a former student-athlete for unethical conduct
- Failure by the institution to adequately monitor the conduct of Chris Hawkins, an individual triggering NCAA agent legislation; the social media activity of the football team for a period in 2010; and possible extra benefits triggered by agent legislation.

The notice of allegations tells the school the alleged NCAA violations the enforcement staff found during the investigation process. The school has 90 days to respond, though they may request more time. After the school issues their response, a hearing date is set with the Committee on Infractions. The Committee on Infractions meets about six times a year, usually lasting for two to three days over a weekend. Most recently the committee heard cases related to Boise State and Tennessee. Ohio State, the grandaddy of NCAA cases these days, is currently scheduled to go before the committee on Aug. 12.

The NCAA requested that the school limit public comments on the details of the investigation and the Notice of Allegations until the hearing before the Committee on Infractions, which has been set for Oct. 28. However, head coach Butch Davis did offer a statement in the official release.

“I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch," Davis said. "I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously."

Chancellor Holden Thorp also took responsibility for the allegations, but also credited the football program's cooperation with the NCAA during this year-long process.

“I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position," Thorp said. "We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football.”

It is not until after the hearing the Committee on Infractions will put together their final report, which will include the penalties for the violations. Different forms of NCAA sanctions include reduced scholarships, postseason bans, vacated wins, recruiting restrictions, and television bans. In recent cases Michigan. USC, Florida State, Texas Tech, and Alabama have received some form of NCAA sanctions.

Posted on: June 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 9:41 pm
 

Records show Blake spoke to players during trip

Posted by Chip Patterson

A whopping $13,000 in parking tickets wasn't the only interesting revelation from North Carolina's release of documents on Thursday. Phone records show communication between former assistant John Blake and former players Marvin Austin and Cam Thomas during their trip to a California training facility before the 2009 season, J.P. Giglio of the News & Observer in Raleigh reported.

Cellphone records were obtained as part of the lawsuit filed by several local media outlets to release information withheld by the university. They show that Blake contacted numbers tied to Austin while he and Thomas were training with former UNC teammate Kentwan Balmer at Proactive Sports Performance in Westlake Village, Calif. -- a location frequently used by Gary Wichard and Pro Tect Management.

If Blake, or anyone else at UNC had knowledge of Austin and Thomas being with Balmer in California, it would be the responsibility of the North Carolina compliance office to investigate whether the trip was permissible.

Austin has contended as recently as March that no one at UNC knew about his trip with Thomas, but the communication between Blake, Wichard, Austin and Thomas suggests otherwise. Hotel receipts financially link Austin to Wichard's agency and show the dates of the players' stay as July 23 to Aug 1. From July 20 to Aug. 3, Blake's records show 20 calls or texts to Wichard's cellphone, 10 to Austin's and eight to Thomas.

While some have argued that these potential violations can be pinned on Blake, who resigned from the program one game into the 2010 season, the reality is that we may be far from the end of these allegations. Local media has a lot to gain from drawing dots together to try and find something that the NCAA may have missed in their investigation. North Carolina received their Notice of Inquiry from the NCAA on June 7, and sources have reported that the Notice of Allegations could come as soon as this week.

Once North Carolina receives their notice from the NCAA, the closure process can finally begin. It has been reported that the school is expecting the notice to highlight nine different infractions, including failure to monitor charges in relation to Blake, tutor Jennifer Wiley, and former player/runner Chris Hawkins. The notice will also include a suggestion of punishments for the allegations, which could include the loss of scholarships, probation or even a postseason and/or television ban. Once the notice is received, the school will have 90 days to respond and then there will be a date set for the school to appear in front of the Committee on Infractions.

For Tar Heel fans, the hope is that no additional allegations can be drawn from the information released as a result of the lawsuit. The faster that notice comes, the faster the hearing can be set and the entire process can finally be settled.

 
 
 
 
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