Tag:Nevin Shapiro
Posted on: August 30, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: August 30, 2011 7:21 pm
 

Eight Miami players suspended by NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Miami head coach Al Golden hoped that he would hear from the NCAA "within 48 hours," and he did.

On Tuesday the NCAA ruled that eight members of the current Hurricanes football team must serve suspensions and repay benefits in order to become eligible again after receiving benefits from former booster Nevin Shapiro.

Senior quarterback Jacory Harris, wide receiver Travis Benjamin, defensive tackle Marcus Forston, defensive end Adewale Ojomo, and linebacker Sean Spence must all serve a one game suspension and repay their benefits. Converted tight end Dyron Dye and safety Ray-Ray Armstrong must serve a four game suspension while defensive end Olivier Vernon must miss six games of competition.

The school confirmed that all of the players with one game suspensions will serve them on Sept. 5 when the team opens the 2011 season against Maryland.

The NCAA deemed that three players (Dye, Armstrong, and Vernon) received "substantial benefits" as prospective student athletes from Shapiro and school employees.  These benefits have been deemed by the NCAA as "serious recruiting violations."  According to the official release the NCAA is categorizing these players differently from the other five, who received impermissible benefits while already enrolled at Miami.

"The NCAA has informed the University of Miami of their decisions regarding the reinstatement of eight student-athletes who were declared ineligible by the University last week,” Miami athletics director Shawn Eichorst said in the official release. “The student-athletes involved have acknowledged receiving improper benefits and will now be responsible for restitution and, in some cases, the student-athletes will also serve game suspensions. They understand that their actions demand consequences."

"We appreciate the diligence and understanding of the NCAA staff and its handling of the student-athlete eligibility issues in an expeditious manner. I would also like to thank Coach [Al] Golden and his staff for their professionalism and leadership over the past few weeks."

Miami also announced that four members of the football team have been cleared by the NCAA to play, but must repay amounts of less than $100 in impermissible benefits. Brandon McGee, JoJo Nicholas, Micanor Regis, and Vaughn Telemaque will all be eligible for Monday's opener against Maryland. Senior defensive end Marcus Robinson has been cleared by the NCAA but will not face any penalties or have to repay any benefits.

One interesting development from the school was the indefinite suspension of senior wide receiver Aldarius Johnson. Johnson had slowly fell behind other wide receivers on the depth chart after suffering an injury in spring practice. He was singled out by Shapiro in the Yahoo! report as someone who received money "at least 10 times" but his suspension is officially for "violation of team rules."

The NCAA found that Oliver Vernon received more than $1,200 in benefits primarily from Shapiro during recruitment. This includes meals, transportation, and "entertainment" at nightclubs, among other allegations. Armstrong was found to have received approximately $788 in extra benefits from Shapiro and personnel, while Dye received approximately $738. Those were listed by the NCAA as impermissible lodging from Miami staff during unofficial visits, transportation, meals, and entertainment at a gentlemen's club.

Meals, transportation, entertainment, night club/gentlemens club cover charges appear to be the common benefits for the five players serving a one game suspension. The NCAA estimates Forston received $400 in benefits, Spence's were valued at $275, Ojomo's total was $240, with Andre Benjamin and Jacory Harris rounding out the group at $150 and $140 respectively.


Posted on: August 30, 2011 2:26 pm
 

Golden: Players need NCAA ruling by Thursday

Posted by Chip Patterson

Miami head coach Al Golden once again met with the media on Tuesday with no depth chart to release. The first-year Hurricanes coach is maintaining his stance that he will not release a depth chart to the media until the NCAA has made a ruling on the players the school has declared ineligible.

CBSSports.com's Brian London writes that Golden called reports of eight ineligible players "inaccurate." So far Golden has refrained from commenting on the investigation or any eligibility details, just that the school has ruled players ineligible and he hopes to get a ruling in time for the Hurricanes opener against Maryland on Monday.

Golden also told reporters that if the ineligible players have not been cleared by Thursday, they will not play against the Terrapins. That way the coaching staff can spend the final practices of the week with the personnel that will be on hand Monday night.

The report that included the "eight players" did not list any specific names other than senior quarterback Jacory Harris. A total of 12 current Hurricanes were listed as allegedly receiving benefits from former booster Nevin Shapiro in the Yahoo report. Some current players not on the Hurricanes roster also listed in the report, such as Purdue quarterback Robert Marve, have been cleared to play by the NCAA.
Posted on: August 29, 2011 10:34 am
Edited on: August 29, 2011 10:37 am
 

Golden expects to hear from NCAA within 48 hours

Posted by Chip Patterson

Miami head coach Al Golden has delayed the release of the Hurricanes' week one depth chart due to the eligibility questions surrounding eight current players and potential violations committed with former booster Nevin Shapiro. The school filed the official paperwork to declare the players ineligible late last week, with hopes the NCAA will make a ruling on their eligibility before the Hurricanes' open the season on Labor Day against Maryland.

According to CBSSports.com's Brian London, Golden was on local radio Monday morning and expects to get a ruling by the NCAA "within 48 hours." The new Hurricanes coach did say that he would coordinate with Maryland's Randy Edsall on the official release of the depth chart, but was hoping to learn the fate of the reported eight ineligible players.

Among those eight players reportedly includes senior quarterback Jacory Harris, who has engaged in a fierce position battle with sophomore Stephen Morris. Both players have received praise from coaches and teammates alike for their performances in fall camp, and Golden even described the race as a "dead heat." Harris confidently told reporters at the team's media day on Saturday , but did not elaborate further on the status of the NCAA investigation.

Posted on: August 25, 2011 7:29 pm
Edited on: August 26, 2011 6:12 am
 

Report: Eight Miami players declared ineligible

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Miami has declared eight football players ineligible and begun the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement process, according to The Miami Herald.

Quarterback Jacory Harris was the only player named in the report as being ineligible, which stems from alleged extra benefits provided by former Hurricanes booster Nevin Shapiro. Four other players, according to the report, were cleared because they accepted fewer than $100 in benefits and can repay the amounts to a charity of their choice in order to play.

It is not known if the ineligible players will complete the reinstatement process in time for Miami's first game against Maryland on September 5. The university was expected to get the proceedings started early in hopes that the NCAA can determine their status for the season opener sooner. Speaking earlier Thursday, head coach Al Golden delayed releasing a depth chart due to the uncertain status of so many players involved in the investigation.

“We'll practice enough guys because we don't know what the future brings,” Golden said. “Hopefully we'll find out in the near future if there are any suspensions or penalties and we'll adjust accordingly.”

Golden said ACC rules require depth charts to be released on Tuesday but that Miami was working with the conference and with the Terrapins to coordinate its release.

At least 12 players involved in the NCAA probe practiced Thursday afternoon according to reports.


Posted on: August 25, 2011 1:23 am
Edited on: August 25, 2011 1:34 am
 

Miami to declare investigated players ineligible?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Of the dozens of Miami players named in Yahoo's now-infamous report from disgraced embezzler and Miami booster Nevin Shapiro, detailing a massive pattern of illegal benefits given to players over a period of nine years, 12 are still with the Hurricanes, awaiting word on the fate of their eligibility. That's a situation without a whole lot of extra time to be resolved, as the Hurricanes open up play just nine days from Thursday.

[MORE: Twelve current Miami players named in report] 

To that end, the Miami Herald is reporting that all 12 players are expected to be named ineligible by the university soon -- but with a better resolution in mind:

If it hasn’t already, the University of Miami is expected to declare the 12 or more football players being investigated by the NCAA ineligible within the next week if the school wants the NCAA to rule on their reinstatement in time for the season opener Sept. 5 at Maryland.

UM had not declared the players ineligible as of early Wednesday afternoon, according to a source with knowledge of the investigation.

This is, if nothing else, a precautionary step; by declaring the players ineligible, the school puts the players' fate in the hands of the NCAA rather than putting the players on the field and rolling the dice with NCAA penalties. The one single way Miami could face the most severe penalties from here on out is if the team knowingly lets players with eligibility problems compete anyway (look what knowingly putting Terrell Pryor and his friends back onto the field in 2010 did to Jim Tressel and Ohio State, for example). With a declaration of ineligibility for all players involved, Miami demonstrates a proper respect for NCAA rules and protocol.

Moreover, as the Herald article explains, the sooner these players are ruled ineligible, the more likely it is the NCAA rules on their punishment before the September 5 season opener against Maryland, which is the first day that ineligibility would truly matter. For example, as astute fans will recall, Cam Newton was declared ineligible by Auburn last season. Auburn quietly made the designation on the Tuesday prior to the SEC Championship Game, then happily announced Newton's reinstatement by the NCAA the very next day. While it's unlikely any of the 'Canes receive similar one-day vacations from eligibility, a ruling and subsequent course of punishment could come similarly quickly from the NCAA, and then at the very least the process back to the field will have begun for the players involved.

It's important to note that rulings on individual eligibility are separate from the NCAA's investigation into institutions, so even if the 12 players get their situations worked out within the next week or two, Miami itself is still in for what's probably a lengthy investigation. Here's more from the Herald:

Stacey Osburn, the NCAA’s associate director of public and media relations, told The Miami Herald in a phone interview that she could not comment on any specific cases, but elaborated on aspects of the process. In a reinstatement situation, any decision involves only that specific player and the facts presented. It is separate from the overall investigation of the institution, although if it is later found that a reinstatement decision is based on lies told by an athlete, the institution is subject to more severe penalties.

Still, as mentioned before, the 12 players don't have the luxury of waiting even two weeks (much less until the end of the investigation) before they need to have their eligibility resolved, so if and when Miami declares them all ineligible, it gets the ball rolling on putting them all back on the field, and it's therefore for their own good.

Posted on: August 22, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: August 22, 2011 5:34 pm
 

Two Guys and a Podcast: Yahoo's Charles Robinson

Posted by Chip Patterson

Charles Robinson of Yahoo Sports joins Gregg Doyel and Will Brinson to talk about the Miami Hurricanes scandal, how long it took him to investigate "the U," whether there are more scandals coming down the pipe, what he thinks of the reaction to his report, Y!'s increased focus on investigative reporting, the process that goes into investigating a huge story like this and much. much more.

Subscribe to Two Guys and a Podcast on iTunes

If you are having trouble seeing the player, you can download the MP3 HERE or CLICK HERE for the Pop-Out Audio Player so you can continue browsing.



Posted on: August 22, 2011 4:52 am
 

Nevin Shapiro tried to land Houston Nutt in 2006

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Former Miami head coach Randy Shannon isn't listed in the exhaustive Yahoo! Sports report* on Nevin Shapiro's extensive expose on impermissble player benefits, unlike the numerous assistants and contemporaries of his. That's not by accident; Shannon is by-the-book to a fault, and it's ironically that disdain for shenanigans that led to the Miami fanbase abandoning the 'Canes by the droves in the weeks preceding Shannon's firing after the 2010 season.

Imagine then, if you will, an alternate reality where instead of straight-laced Shannon running the Miami program, the head coach is current Arkansas coach Houston Nutt. Heads are now exploding nationwide. And according to the Orlando Sentinel, it came closer to happening than you would expect:

As the Sentinel reported late Sunday, Nevin Shapiro was personally involved in trying to recruit Nutt to coach the Hurricanes -- and his contact with the coach preceded several discussions between Nutt and university brass:

According to Nutt’s cell phone records obtained by the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette through the Freedom of Information Act, Nutt spoke with Shapiro, in addition to UM assistant AD Tony Hernandez.

According to records, Nutt called Shapiro at 10:17 a.m. on Dec. 7, 2006 and the call lasted 30 minutes. Nutt then hung up and called his agent, Jimmy Sexton, before contacting Shapiro again that same day. Nutt also called Hernandez four times in a span of four hours that day.

That alternate reality almost came true! The theoretical NCAA violations are almost certainly even worse, aren't they? That's not an attack specifically on Nutt, who was head coach of Ole Miss at the time of the report, but Shannon brought a deep and abiding respect for the University of Miami and the rules it (ostensibly) operates under, and Insert Any Big-Name Coach With No Miami Ties Here almost certainly wouldn't bring that same approach. Get that same coach from the SEC, and the rules are going to get bent beyond recognition, like so many flat sheets of paper turned into origami swans.

Still, it's worth noting that Shapiro's influence did not get Nutt the Miami job. Not only that, Miami hired the most anti-Shapiro coach fathomable, and Shapiro was so angry at the Hurricanes' new adherence to the rules that he tried to pick a fight with Miami's director of compliance during a bowl game. If anything saves the program during the impending NCAA bloodshed, it's the fact that in the middle of Shapiro's influence on the program, it ignored Shapiro's contact with an in-demand coach that flirted with multiple BCS programs before eventually landing at Arkansas, where Nutt has since led the program to a BCS bowl game.

So imagining Houston Nutt as the Miami coach post-Larry Coker is nothing more than a thought exercise, because absent some evidence that not even Yahoo! could conjure up -- and lord knows they tried -- there's nothing the NCAA can point to that would suggest the Miami administrators valued anything about Shapiro or Nutt over what Shannon and his compliance-centric approach offered the program. That's small comfort for a football program trying to distance itself from the excesses of Shapiro and his well-documented interaction with the team, but it's also a fact that just might save the Hurricanes' program from the death penalty.


*For the record, Shapiro's lawyer, Maria Elena Perez, said in a phone interview that she believed Shannon had direct knowledge of Shapiro's dealings, but even her statement was phrased in a way that it wasn't entirely credible; it seems much more likely that Perez misremembered the facts than that Yahoo!'s 11-month investigation missed or omitted evidence that Shannon was directly involved, doesn't it? 

Posted on: August 20, 2011 12:50 pm
Edited on: August 20, 2011 12:53 pm
 

Larry Coker not distracted by Miami scandal

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As the University of Texas-San Antonio prepares to play the first football game in school's history, a lot of the attention being paid to the team right now has to do with the school its head coach used to coach at. Larry Coker spent 12 years coaching at Miami, and won a national title with the Hurricanes as head coach in 2001.

The five years Coker spent as head coach at Miami coincided with the time that Nevin Shapiro claims he was lavishing the team with all sorts of gifts and perks, and while Coker feels bad for what's going on at Miami right now, he seems more concerned about life at UTSA.

“I'm almost more distraught, because I was there for 12 years,” Coker told the San Antonio Express-News. “(It's) not a distraction, because I haven't done anything. But the people there, the players ... it's very hurtful, it really is.” 

What Coker didn't do was say whether or not he knew of the things Shapiro was doing at Miami, saying in a report earlier in the week that he knew Shapiro by name only.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com