Tag:Ohio
Posted on: April 28, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: April 28, 2011 1:08 pm
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Former Ohio lineman dead at 23

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Former Ohio defensive lineman Marcellis Williamson died at the age of 23 on Wednesday according to a release from the school

“We can confirm that former Ohio defensive tackle Marcellis Williamson, a native of East Cleveland, Ohio, passed away late this afternoon,” said Jason Corriher, assistant Athletics director for media relations.

Williamson checked himself into Euclid Hospital on Wednesday and was discharged, dying later in the day. While Ohio would not get into specifics regarding Williamson's death, friends and teammates say that Williamson suffered a heart attack.

Williamson graduated from Ohio at the end of the 2010 fall semester, and was a starter for the Bobcats the last two seasons. He finished the 2010 season with 36 tackles, 3.5 for loss and .5 sacks. He left a message on his Facebook page on Wednesday, his last, that read "I am blessed to have waken up this morning!! Enjoy today because tomorrow isn't guaranteed.

Posted on: February 3, 2011 2:17 pm
 

Coaches coming, going on the Nebraska staff

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Signing Day at Nebraska was plenty celebration-worthy when it came to the actual signing: the Huskers inked one of the Big Ten's best classes, and maybe the program's strongest since the 2007 haul that netted Prince Amukamara and Jared Crick.

But that didn't keep one local columnist from calling the day "awkward" and "uncomfortable" for Bo Pelini and the Huskers all the same, thanks to some questions swirling around the makeup of the Nebraska coaching staff.

Those start with the status of current Husker secondary coach Marvin Sanders. New Indiana head coach Kevin Wilson said Wednesday that Hoosier assistant Corey Raymond would be departing Bloomington for Lincoln to join Pelini's staff, and what's more, he'd be coaching the secondary. So where does that leave Sanders? Pelini :
"I'll address any staff questions at another time ... This is not the time or the place."
Given that "is this coach a member of your staff?" isn't exactly a complicated question, it's fair that the situation itself is complicated. Sanders was also a no-show at a recruiting event Wednesday night, though offensive coordinator Shawn Watson and receivers coach Ted Gilmore were also missing-in-action, sparking (still unfounded) rumors that Pelini had decided to initiate a more comprehensive staff overhaul.

Adding more fuel to the fire: per the above-linked Lincoln Journal-Star column , Pelini has already spoken to Oregon assistant and former Husker quarterback hero Scott Frost about potentially making to move to Lincoln.

But where Sanders looks likely to be on his way out (and the under-fire Watson may follow), another coach looks likely to be on his way in. Ohio linebackers coach Ross Els -- assistant to former Nebraska head coach Frank Solich and a former colleague of current Husker defensive coordinator Carl Pelini when Pelini was on staff at Ohio -- has emerged as the leading candidate to replace previous linebackers coach Mike Ekeler, who left Lincoln to coach at ... wait for it ... Indiana.

It's a tangled web the situation here is weaving. But there's a chance it becomes more tangled still before we know exactly who'll be coaching the Huskers in 2011.

Posted on: January 20, 2011 3:51 pm
 

Coaching hires show Sun Belt still FBS's worst

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College football fans love to chatter about which of the 11 FBS conferences is best. They get much less excited to discuss which of them is worst, though for the few who do, this past bowl season provided some quality fodder when the two leagues generally considered the FBS's weakest -- the MAC and Sun Belt -- squared off in three different bowl games. The Sun Belt came out ahead 2-1, with Troy dominating Ohio and FIU winning a 34-32 barnburner over Toledo. (MAC champion Miami (Ohio) did cruise past Middle Tennessee State for the Midwestern league's victory in the MAC-SBC "Challenge.") Case closed?

Not even close. This week the College Football Blog reviewed all 22 (or 21, if you don't count Dana Holgorsen at West Virginia) new head coaching hires in our Headset Reset series , and that review turned up something interesting about the Sun Belt and the MAC: namely, that the MAC is making much stronger coaching hires.

First, look at the MAC's new coaches : two of them are coordinators from two of the 2010 Big Ten co-champions; one was the offensive coordinator and highest-ranking assistant for Urban Meyer's national-title winning program at Florida ; one was a longtime position coach and ace recruiter for Ohio State; and the "weakest" of the hires on paper, Ball State's Pete Lembo, is a 40-year-old coach with 10 years of successful head coaching experience on the FCS level already under his belt.

Contrast that with the Sun Belt's three choices: one a promotion from within the Arkansas State staff, one a potentially past-his-prime Florida position coach, the other the Mississippi State wide receivers coach.

All three of those hires could prove to be shrewd (it's not as if Dan McCarney and Mark Hudspeth don't have quality head coaching experience to draw on, and Hugh Freeze has been knocking on the door of his own head coaching gig for years). But if the MAC is to the Big Ten as the Sun Belt is to the SEC, then you'd have seen the SBC hiring the SEC equivalents of Don Treadwell or Dave Doeren (pictured at right), well-regarded college-first coordinators like Manny Diaz or John Chavis or Mike Bobo. That's not happening. In fact, the only 2010 SEC coordinator to take a head coaching job this offseason went to ... Temple.

(As an aside, this might also be an indication of the relative strength of the Big Ten and SEC; where SEC schools are willing to pay top dollar to retain their best assistants and keep them out of the clutches of smaller schools, the Big Ten watches the likes of Treadwell and Doeren walk away.)

The Sun Belt's bowl performance was nice. But until they show they can land the same caliber of coaching talent as their Midwestern counterparts (or, more easily, the WAC says its official goodbyes to Nevada, Fresno State and Hawaii) they should continue to be regarded at the bottom of the FBS conference barrel.

Posted on: December 20, 2010 1:51 pm
Edited on: December 20, 2010 2:14 pm
 

Beef O'Brady's Bowl dance-off almost starts brawl

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

As the lead paragraph to this fascinating story out of St. Petersburg correctly observes:
Events leading to the Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl are supposed to be fun-filled activities for the teams, their families and fans to participate in.
But with a beginning like that, you can also guess that some activity or other wound up not so fun-filled. And that's the case here, as a poolside dance competition included in the bowl's "Beachside Bash" resulted in some serious trash talk between players from participating teams Louisville and Southern Miss, rising tensions, and eventually the intervention of Florida state troopers to prevent a full-on brawl from breaking out in front of what must have been some seriously horrified Card/Eagle fans.

As for how things got that heated, the players explain:

"Someone said something disrespectful, did a little jawing after the dance contest… it's all good," said Louisville linebacker Dexter Heyman , who was front and center in the fracas. It's "just a little too close to game time, ya know?" .

Southern Miss players had a different perspective.

"They started talking trash about us being in Conference USA, [that] we can't dance… it was stupid. We'll do our talking on the field," uttered one Golden Eagle who refused to be identified. "A friendly dance competition and they take it all serious? It's ridiculous."

See? We told all you layabout whippersnappers out there that nothing good was going to come out of this "Dougie" funny business.

But here's the good news: after Saturday's lackluster slate of action -- in which UTEP, Fresno State, and Ohio didn't seem half as jacked-up for their actual bowl games as these teams seem to be for their just-for-fun dance competitions -- the acrimony in St. Pete promises to give us something worthwhile to watch Tuesday night, even if it's just some postgame "service" applied to the losers.

 



Posted on: December 19, 2010 1:18 am
 

Bowl Grades: New Orleans Bowl

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Final score: Troy 48, Ohio 21

Troy

Offense: How good was the Troy offense? QB Corey Robinson was 21-27 for 262 yards, four touchdowns, and no interceptions. Um, that was at the half. Troy led at the break 38-7, and scored on every possession until the fourth quarter. Jerrel Jernigan and Tebiarus Gill combined for all five of Troy's touchdowns, and eventually combined for 144 yards from scrimmage. The Trojans would eventually register 602 yards from scrimmage, even after the reserves found their way onto the field. This is an easier A than Geology 101. Grade: A+

Defense: The Trojans did give up 21 points, but allowed only 99 yards on 30 rushes and four first downs on 12 third down conversion attempts. Ohio's offense was mostly stifled while the game was in any semblance of doubt. An interception by Jimmy Anderson in Troy territory set the tone for the game, and the Trojans never looked back. Grade: B

Coaching: Larry Blankeny put his team in a position to win by playing to his team's strengths. The Trojan offense is fast-paced and designed to highlight Robinson's accuracy, and the playcalling put the ball in Jernigan's hands in a variety of ways; Jernigan's first touchdown came out of a keeper from the Wildcat formation, and Jernigan would finish with three rushes on the day. Blankeny had his team fired up for the game, and the difference in effort was readily apparent throughout the first half -- at which point the game was pretty well decided. Grade: A

Ohio

Offense: The Ohio offense features a two-headed attack at quarterback; Boo Jackson is the better passer, while Phil Bates is the more athletic ball-carrier. Bates, in fact, threw one pass for the entire game; it was the Anderson interception on Ohio's second play from scrimmage mentioned earlier. So while Jackson threw for over 200 yards and three touchdowns, almost none of it came in a first half that saw precisely one possession achieve a first down. Grade: D

Defense: The Bobcats did not play defense. Grade: INCOMPLETE

Coaching: What Frank Solich was thinking by staying conservative in the first half, even as Troy was running the Bobcats out of the Superdome, is beyond us. During the first two plays of each of the Bobcats' first half possessions, the Bobcats ran on 10 of 13 plays (the final drive of the half was one play long); those 10 rushes resulted in 10 yards and no first downs. Sure, the passing was 1-3 for six yards and an interception, but the message from Solich was clear: he had a formula, and he was sticking to it. It was a very ill-advised message to send, as it put Ohio out of any position to win. Grade: F

Final Grade

It would be unfair to give a failing grade to a game that featured such a well-functioning offense in the first three quarters AND a surprise giant manbeard courtesy of punter Will Goggans (above) in the fourth. There were aspects of the game that were fun to watch, even though the endgame drama had been sucked out of the Superdome by the end of the Trojans' fourth possession. Jerrel Jernigan is going to get a chance to succeed in the NFL, and we hope he makes the most of it; embarrassing the Ohio defense isn't exactly difficult to do, but he was the most athletic player on the field all the same, and some of the moves he made in stride were Sunday-worthy. It's just a shame that between the television audience and the laughably sparse Superdome crowd, probably under 100,000 people actually got to watch him. Still, this game was as anti-climactic as the first two, so we must grade sternly so as to send a message to the rest of the bowls: this will not do. Grade: D-

Posted on: December 19, 2010 12:16 am
Edited on: December 19, 2010 4:11 am
 

PHOTOS: Troy's punter has greatest beard ever

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Let's face it, it takes a "special" kind of person to stay watching a game like the New Orleans Bowl -- a 48-21 thumping by Troy over Ohio -- a couple minutes before midnight on the last Saturday before Christmas. Yet those who stayed with the game were rewarded when Troy punter Will Goggans finally got his shot at uncorking a punt in the fourth quarter (Troy had scored on every single possession before then). Goggans' punt was downed at the 1-yard line, which was cool to see in and of itself, but HOLY HOLY HOLY THAT BEARD:

According to announcers, Goggans has been growing the beard for the entire year in preparation for his role in a play as Santa Claus. Well, that's as good a reason as any to grow a beard. They also mentioned that Goggans would be shaving the beard in a few days after the play is done, and perhaps the women in his life would prefer he do so, but we must strenuously disagree with that decision. That's the finest beard in college football. He makes Adrian Clayborn look like an 8th grader with a crustache. May the beard live forever.


Posted on: December 16, 2010 12:04 pm
 

CBS Bowl Bonanza: New Orleans Bowl

Posted by Chip Patterson

Why You Should Watch: As opposed to other early bowls, where teams occasionally enter the bowl feeling as though they did not reach their expectations on the season, the R and L Carriers New Orleans Bowl carries immense weight to both teams involved. Troy, making their third New Orleans Bowl appearance in the last five years, will be looking to finish the season strong after clinching a share of the Sun Belt Conference Championship. Ohio has yet to capture their first bowl win, and will be making their fifth postseason attempt in the Superdome. Last season, the Bobcats fell 21-17 to Marshall in the Little Caeser's Pizza Bowl. This will be the first time in school history the team has been to bowl games in back-to-back years. Much of that can be credited to a familiar face on the Ohio sideline: head coach Frank Solich. Solich, of Nebraska football fame. So even if you are failing to find a reason to fall in love with the matchup, it is at least worth a watch for the "Where are they now?" factor.

Keys To Victory for Troy: Troy will be able to create offensive opportunities with their high-powered spread scheme, but with 15 interceptions on the season, freshman quarterback Corey Robinson can be a liability for the Trojans. The responsibility will fall on their rushing game to keep the Ohio secondary honest. The three-man attack of DuJuan Harris, Shawn Southward, and Chris Anderson will try and utilize seams opened by the spread attack to balance the offense. That will hopefully leave dangerous slot receiver Jerrel Jernigan an opportunity to get the ball in open field - where he has the best chance to hurt the Bearcats.

Keys To Victory for Ohio: Ohio ranks just outside the top 10 nationally with 17 interceptions on the season, and that secondary will be looking to take advantage of the interception-prone Robinson. Additionally, the offensive line will need to provide quarterback Boo Jackson with protection against Troy's front four. If the Trojans line can penetrate into the backfield and disrupt the timing of Jackson's reads, they will be masking their greatest weakness: the run. The Bobcats have utilize a lot of different rushers out of the Pistol formation, and if they can keep Troy on their heels they can dictate the pace of the game. Jackson has shown the ability to manage games well, but he cannot be counted on to play catch up with the deep ball. Ohio needs to avoid an early deficit to keep the game close.

The New Orleans Bowl is like: A surprisingly good appetizer. Sure, you ordered the artichoke dip because you nothing on the menu jumped out at you and you figured "why not?" The night cap on the first day of the bowl season may seem like it has a "why not" feel. But then once you dig in you find it to be surprisingly pleasing, so much that you wonder why you ever imagined skipping the course at all. Troy and Ohio both have plenty of reason to be fired up to finish their season in the Superdome, and they match up well enough to promise a close game. Many of the athletes on these teams may have been just one or two notches away from big-time football, don't think that running onto the field in New Orleans won't have that fell for them.

Posted on: November 24, 2010 12:24 pm
Edited on: November 24, 2010 12:41 pm
 

Gee comments off the mark

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Particularly for an academic, Ohio State president Gordon Gee has never been shy about expressing his opinions on athletics, popular or not.

And it's a safe bet that the opinions he expressed today in an interview with the AP are going to be most decidedly unpopular in Boise and Fort Worth. Writing off entire conferences as the "Little Sisters of the Poor" isn't particularly becoming for the president of the nation's largest university, and criticizing TCU and Boise for their schedules is more than a little hypocritical when one advanced rating puts the Buckeyes' schedule strength barely above the Frogs' or Broncos' and both non-AQ teams have played a more challenging nonconference slate than the Buckeyes' lineup with Marshall , Eastern Michigan , and Ohio .

But as infuriating as Gee's viewpoint might be to those who'd agree the non-AQ teams are far more deserving this season than the 10-1 Buckeyes (whose best win until last week's triumph at 7-4 Iowa was a home win over either 7-4 Penn State or 7-4 Miami ), at the end of the day it's just another warmed-over rehashing of the same arguments that have surrounded Boise and TCU all season (and for much of the past two). Where Gee is really, truly wrong is in his comments on expanding the football postseason to ensure that we don't have to have these same tired debates:

Gee, long an admirer of the BCS and the current bowl system, said he was against a playoff in the Football Bowl Subdivision.

"If you put a gun to my head and said, 'What are you going to do about a playoff system [if] the BCS system as it now exists goes away?' I would vote immediately to go back to the bowl system," he said.

He said the current system is better for the student-athletes.

"It's not about this incessant drive to have a national championship because I think that's a slippery slope to professionalism," he said. "I'm a fan of the bowl system and I think that by and large it's worked very, very well."

Gee isn't just arguing that Boise and TCU don't deserve a title shot this year; he's arguing that college football should entrench a postseason system that would ensure that they never got that title shot. What his argument (and similar diatribes against "playoffs") misses is that college football already has a playoff; it selects a number of teams, pairs them off, and the winner is automatically declared the champion. Where the BCS playoff differs from every other playoff in existence is that it only includes two teams. To frame the debate in terms of some nebulous future "playoff" against a current BCS system that varies from that bogeyman only in terms of the number of teams involved is to rig the debate permanently in the BCS's favor.

Gee's desire to preserve what amateurism and respect for academics remain in college football is admirable. But there's a point at which even those concerns have to give way to basic fairness. And surely the permanent exclusion of the TCU's and Boise's of the sport from national title consideration represents that point; what Gee proposes is to draw a line between college football's haves and have-nots, one based on conference affiliation, and declare that the latter can never cross it. It's elitism and snobbery of the highest order.

Now, a show of hands: who's in favor of Wisconsin blowing their season finale against Northwestern and setting up a showdown between Gee's Buckeyes and either the Frogs or Broncos in the Rose Bowl ? Is that everyone (Badger fans excluded)? Yes, we think that's everyone.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com