Tag:non-BCS
Posted on: May 17, 2011 6:11 pm
Edited on: May 18, 2011 6:47 pm
 

Tommie Frazier's snub highlights poor HOF policy

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The College Football Hall of Fame announced its class of 2011 today, electing 16 former players and coaches to the ranks of gridiron immortality. Of the six players we had tabbed in March as the most deserving of induction, three (Deion Sanders, Russell Maryland, and Eddie George) were elected today, so we don't have quite the gripe we did earlier.

And yet, there are still dozens upon dozens of clearly deserving players who haven't been granted induction into the Hall, had to wait an unreasonably long time to be inducted, or for whatever reason, aren't even on the ballot yet. Eric Dickerson has been out of college football for nearly 30 years, and he's not in yet. He was out of the NFL for all of five years before being named a first-ballot Pro Football Hall of Famer. Deion Sanders was elected a full 22 seasons after he last played a down for Florida State. Of the 16 inductees in this class, the youngest player is Arizona DT Rob Waldrop, who last played in 1993. Others, like Oklahoma running back Clendon Thomas, played upwards of 50 years ago. There's no real telling why they were just now elected. 

On that note, this is Tommie Frazier's first time on the ballot, and his collegiate career ended sixteen years ago, in 1994. Sixteen years! What, exactly, was going to change about Frazier's resume between 1999 (granting him the same five-year post-career moratorium on voting that the pros use) and today? And being that nothing changed about that resume, why on earth wasn't he elected on this ballot?

Let's go back over the facts. Frazier went 33-3 as a starting quarterback for Nebraska -- an absurd .917 career winning percentage. His Huskers went to three title games in that span, winning two national championships and coming within one (badly) missed field goal of a third. Frazier rushed for 2,286 yards and 36 touchdowns in his career, and threw for over 4,000 yards and 47 more TDs to just 18 interceptions. He is unquestionably one of the best option quarterbacks in college football history. And he capped that incredible career with this famous run in the National Championship against Florida, which just so happens to be one of the best plays in college football history.

So if Tommie Frazier is not an immediate, unquestionable first-ballot Hall of Famer in this sport, then what is the point of having a College Football Hall of Fame? Why is the Hall of Fame not even bothering to induct anybody who played fewer than 17 years ago? Are they backed up? Understaffed? Unable to properly address his candidacy for whatever reason? Perhaps the Hall should go all-out next year and elect about 90 players and coaches next year, because between the players who weren't voted in and the ones who aren't 40 years old or older yet, there is no shortage of great college football players who aren't being given their due praise on a timely basis. Look at the ballot voters had to deal with this year. It's filled with guys who deserve recognition, and it's comically outdated. It's a list that -- barring the rare late-'90s player like Matt Stinchcomb or Joe Hamilton -- should have been in front of the voters 20 years ago, not today.

If there's some political reason that Frazier's not in the Hall yet -- didn't glad-hand enough or give off the impression that he wanted to be in or whatever -- then that's unbearable, because that's not what a Hall of Fame should be about. The fact of the matter is that a College Football Hall of Fame that does not include Tommie Frazier is an incomplete Hall of Fame, and the voters owe it to Frazier, Nebraska, and college football as a whole to fix this mistake as soon as possible. Anything else is a plain travesty. 

Posted on: May 17, 2011 11:16 am
 

Teams to watch for turnover trouble

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We're certainly not breaking any news when we tell you that turnover margin is, yes, the kind of statistic that can make or break a team's season or -- for regular readers of Phil Steele and the numbers-minded like -- one that fluctuates from season-to-season nearly at random. While elite teams like Pete Carroll's mid-decade USC squads can end up consistently on the positive side of turnover margin, this correlation study at College Football News concludes that for most teams, it's more about the bounce of the ball:
[I]t's clear that for most teams, the turnover margin they enjoy one year has virtually zero predictive value for the turnover margin they will enjoy the next year. That means that on average, teams with substantially positive margins will see major decline in margin the next year, and teams with substantially negative margins will see major improvement the next year. A team with a -10 turnover margin in 2009, for example, would have an expected turnover margin of -1.2 in 2010, an improvement of nearly a full turnover per game!
Again, it's not a surprising conclusion (though that "nearly a full turnover per game" number deserves the exclamation point). But it's worth emphasizing that as we start to look towards the 2011 season, we pay a particularly skeptical eye towards teams with gaudy -- and likely unsustainable -- 2010 turnover margins. Here's a few:

Tulsa (+17). The Golden Hurricane are likely to be among the Conference USA favorites thanks to the 1-2 punch of quarterback G.J. Kinne and receiver/returner Damaris Johnson, but their no-huddle attack has always been something of a turnover slot machine and the overhaul  on the coaching staff won't help limit mistakes.

Connecticut (+12). No one's expecting a repeat trip to the Fiesta Bowl, but Paul Pasqualoni might have an even more difficult job ahead of him than expected. With quarterback Zach Fraser gone and the defense unlikely to come up with 31 takeaways again, just staying on the positive side will be an accomplishment.

Army (+16). The Black Knights are in better shape under Rich Ellerson, program-wise, than they've been in ages. But as the study points out, it's tough to expect a team that's averaged a -5 finish over the past eight years to turn in overwhelmingly positive margins two years running.

Maryland (+15). The Terps finished tied for fifth in the nation in fewest giveaways, and while some of that was steady quarterbacking by Danny O'Brien, some of it was also an amazing four fumbles lost all season. (Only Ohio State and Wisconsin lost fewer.) A repeat performance in that department is highly, highly unlikely.

Oregon (+13), Oklahoma State (+12). Many national title contenders are able to rely on year-in, year-out success in the turnover department -- Alabama has been +36 over the past three seasons, Ohio State an incredible +48 in that span -- but in the cases of the Ducks and Cowboys, their 2010 margins reperesented a quantum leap forward; they finished at +2 and 0 the year before, respectively, with neither better than +5 the year before that.

If either is going to make their expected BCS push in 2011 (or another one, in Oregon's case), they'll have to show that 2010 was the start of a Buckeye- or Tide-like trend rather than a fortunate one-off.

Posted on: May 13, 2011 12:14 pm
 

Nightclub tries to get OSU in more trouble

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As if Ohio State isn't having a hard enough time keeping itself out of trouble, now nightclubs are trying to get the school hit with NCAA violations. A nightclub in Huber Heights, Ohio was planning on having a graduation party of sorts for Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller and his high school teammate Tre Moore. Both players graduated from high school earlier this year and enrolled early in college for spring practice, though Moore is attending Northern Illinois.

The club, Heat, had advertised the party on Facebook and since it used both Miller and Moore's names, it was an NCAA violation and one that both players had to distance themselves from.

Even though [Miller and Moore] said they had no part in the planning of the event, they moved quickly to disassociate themselves from it after being questioned about their involvement by Wayne coach Jay Minton.

“I was coming home from Illinois after spring ball at Northern Illinois, and coach Minton gave me a call when I was in the airport trying to get to Ohio,” Moore said. “And then Braxton gave me a call and said, ‘We have to find out who did this and get it taken care of.’

“I’m guessing they found some people who knew me and Braxton, probably some Wayne kids. I don’t how they picked me and him, but I’m glad we can clean this mess up.”

The bar had been planning on charging $10 at the door for guys, and $7 for ladies.

Making things more interesting, the club was supposedly throwing a party for two 18-year old kids when it's a 21-and over establishment. Local police said that it would be illegal for the club to even let Miller and Moore inside. Not that this club is averse to breaking the law, as the story points out that there have been 15 incidents with police, including arrests for drug possession, gun possession and an assault of an officer, at the club since it opened in December.

And it's only open on weekends.

Posted on: May 12, 2011 5:42 pm
Edited on: May 12, 2011 8:05 pm
 

NCAA owes it to itself to support NFL owners

Posted by Adam Jacobi

As the days, weeks, and months creep by and the NFL labor situation gets no closer to resolution, diehard NFL fans find themselves in a predicament: what is there to do if there's no pro football? Do they breathe a sigh of relief and count the money they'll end up saving? Do they take up other activities, recommit themselves to family life on weekends, and put sports in general on the back burner? Or do they stare at an upcoming autumn devoid of football, freak out, and find the nearest college team to support until pro ball comes back?

If the NCAA is wise, it'll bank on the last scenario -- that NFL fans are really football fans. Then, it'll throw its full-throated support behind the NFL owners, who are currently fighting tooth-and-nail to protect the lockout they've placed on the players ... and reap the glorious benefits. Let's face it, no business for the NFL is good business for college football, and there are several college programs in particular that stand to benefit immensely from a protracted work stoppage in the pro ranks.

The Miami Hurricanes have a new coach and, um, plenty of seats for displaced NFL fans. Colorado has a new coach and a new conference with new rivals. Minnesota's got a new coach and a two-year-old stadium that makes the Metrodome look like... well, the Metrodome was already terrible, but TCF Bank Stadium is still a major plus for the Gophers. Those are three prime opportunities for athletic departments to encourage new fans to "help us start a new chapter in our future." Think Dolphins, Vikings, and Broncos fans aren't going to notice that opportunity? Especially if college tickets are half as expensive and there are ten times as many gorgeous young women at the tailgates?

The Houston Cougars should have Case Keenum back to finish his quest to break the NCAA passing records. He's just the next step in Houston's tradition of great college quarterbacks (David Klingler, Andre Ware, and to-a-somewhat-lesser-extent-but-he-
was-still-pretty-darned-good Kevin Kolb), and it would be insane for the Cougars not to publicize his assault on the record books on a weekly basis. Besides, no offense to the Texans, but the Cougars are the local team with more football tradition anyway.

Northwestern has billed itself as "Chicago's college football team" recently. That seems a little unfair to the hundreds of thousands of Chicagoans who are alumni of other major universities, but if the Chicago Bears are sitting at home on Sundays, Northwestern turns into the city's ONLY football team. Similarly, the idea of Indiana actually selling out its Memorial Stadium on a regular basis seems like far less of a pipe dream if Lucas Oil Stadium's sitting empty on weekends. Purdue would be happy to accommodate some of those Colts fans too.

The impact of a large influx of fans, if even for a game or two, is not insignificant. 10,000 extra tickets sold for $25 a pop equals a quarter-million dollars in extra ticket revenue alone, to say nothing of concessions, merchandise, and parking fees. That's something some teams can accomplish in one game. And that's just immediate money in. There's also the inroads made with fans, particularly younger ones. Making entreaties to families and younger adults means that the college football program can start cultivating long-lasting fan relationships -- and new donors. The alumni associations can always use the help, after all.

So, athletic directors and college coaches. Line up shoulder-to-shoulder behind the NFL's owners, and stand tall in their support. Then take, take, take from them. College football will be stronger for it.

Posted on: May 11, 2011 11:56 am
 

Tulane loses assistant to a high school

Posted by Tom Fornelli

In college football, loyalty only goes so far in the world of coaches. The fact of the matter is, unless you're the head coach at your alma mater, a coach is generally always on the lookout for the next job. The next step up on the ladder. So an assistant leaving a school for another is no big deal. But then there's what happened to Tulane this week.

Dan Dodd had been the assistant head coach at Tulane for the last three years, and had been at the school for four. Dodd is now leaving Tulane to become a head coach at another school. Which would be totally normal except for the fact that this new school is a high school.

Dan Dodd, the assistant head football coach at Tulane University, has accepted the position of K-12 athletic director and varsity football coach at Capistrano Valley Christian Schools, the school announced Tuesday. Dodd, a graduate of San Clemente High, replaces Chris Fore, who said he has resigned to pursue other opportunities.

“Coach Dodd will clearly bring a new look to our football program, which will be highly attractive to student athletes who want to play for a coach who believes in young men and what they can accomplish," Dr. Ron Sipus, head of schools for CVCS, said in a press release. "Our athletes will get playing time in a quality program and if they develop their skills, Coach Dodd, because of his background, can connect them to the right college recruiters and coaches.” 

Now, I've no idea how good a school Capistrano Valley is, or how much they'll be paying Dodd at his new job. So I'm not going to question his decision to leave the position of assistant head coach at an FBS school to become a head coach at a high school. I'm just going to wish him luck at the new gig.

As far as Tulane is concerned, ouch. Maybe Dodd just took his dream job, but it's never going to look good when your assistant head coach feels that taking a head coaching job at a high school is a step up in his career. I mean, I can't remember anyone doing something like this since coach Eric Taylor left TMU to return to Dillion High School. 
Posted on: May 4, 2011 5:05 pm
Edited on: May 4, 2011 5:06 pm
 

TEXT: Dept. of Justice's letter to Emmert, BCS

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Yesterday, the United States Department of Justice issued a letter to NCAA president Mark Emmert and BCS executive Bill Hancock, asking why the FBS (formerly I-A football) did not have a postseason playoff, among other questions. The DOJ has not introduced a formal case against the NCAA, nor has it announced any future plans to bring one, but this letter, reprinted in full below, makes it appear that simply declaring confidence that no antitrust laws are being broken, as Hancock has done in the past, may no longer a viable option for the NCAA or BCS.

The letter is also available in PDF form from the Utah attorney general's office here

 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
Antitrust Division 
CHRISTINE A. VARNEY 
Assistant Attorney General 
RFK Main Justice Building 
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C.  20530-0001 
(202)514-2401/  (202)616-2645 (Fax) 

May 3, 2011 

Mark A. Emmert, Ph.D. 
President 
National Collegiate Athletic Association 
P.O. Box 6222 
Indianapolis, IN 46206 

Dear Dr. Emmert:

Serious questions continue to arise suggesting that the current Bowl Championship Series (BCS) system may not be conducted consistent with the competition principles expressed in the federal antitrust laws. The Attorney General of Utah has announced an intention to file an antitrust lawsuit against the BCS. In addition, we recently received a request to open an investigation of the BCS from a group of twenty-one professors, a copy of which is attached. Other prominent individuals also have publicly encouraged the Antitrust Division to take action aggainst the BCS, arguing that it violates the antitrust laws.

On March 2, 2011, the New York Times reported that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) was "willing to help create a playoff format to decide a national championship for the top level of college football." In that context, it would be helpful for us to understand your views and/or plans on the following:

  1. Why does the Football Bowl Subdivision not have a playoff, when so many other NCAA sports have NCAA-run playoffs or championships?
  2. What steps, if any, has the NCAA taken to create a playoff among Football Bowl Subdivision programs before or during your tenure? To the extent any steps were taken, why were they not successful? What steps does the NCAA plan to take to create a playoff at this time?
  3. Have you determined that there are aspects of the BCS system that do not serve the interests of fans, colleges, universities, and players? To what extent could an alternative system better serve those interests?

Your views would be relevant in helping us to determine the best course of action with regard to the BCS. Therefore, we thank you in advance for your prompt attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Christine A. Varney

cc:   Bill Hancock 

BCS executive director

Posted on: May 4, 2011 8:41 am
Edited on: May 4, 2011 8:56 am
 

Boise State self-imposes penalties for violations

Posted by Chip Patterson

After responsding to the NCAA's notice of allegations Monday evening, Boise State has begun to take action to return to good graces with the NCAA.  According to the Idaho Statesman the school submitted a "roughly 1,500-word defense" against the NCAA charges, which include secondary violations in football and a major violation in women's tennis.  The document includes plans for self-imposed punishment, preventative action for the future, and defends the school against allegations of a "lack of institutional control."

For the football team, the Broncos will have at least three fewer preseason practices in 2011 and 2012.  Boise State is slated to face Georgia in the Chick Fil-A Kickoff Game in Atlanta on Sept. 3.  They will open the 2012 season at Michigan State.  Head coach Chris Petersen will also have three less scholarships to award over the next two seasons as part of the self-imposed penalties.  The NCAA Committee on Infractions will review Boise State's case in a meeting on June 10 in Indianapolis.  There they will decide whether the self-imposed penalties issued by the school suffice as proper punishment.

The football program did commit secondary violations, but it is important to note that Petersen and his staff's greatest threat here is guilt by association.  The violations totaled $4,934 in impermissible benefits to 63 incoming players during the summers of 2005-2008.  That's just over $78 per student athlete for housing and transportation.  Those dollar amounts have been repaid, and the hope is that there will be no further punishment levied against the football program.
Posted on: May 3, 2011 3:36 pm
Edited on: May 3, 2011 3:36 pm
 

Candy scandal rocks Hawaii athletics

Posted by Adam Jacobi

After word got out last night that Boise State was facing a variety of NCAA violations, including the dreaded lack of institutional control, one couldn't help but think that there was more bad news on the way. Not necessarily for Boise, per se, but schools like it: athletic overachievers from lightly populated, western states. Well, lo and behold, a disturbing confession comes to us from blogger and former Hawaii professor Patrick Johnston today.

This is obviously terrible news for Hawaii athletics. Candy is known to contain enough sweeteners to put athletes on a "sugar high," and chocolate contains caffeine, a known stimulant. There's no telling what kind of sugar-crazed maniacs were flying out of Johnston's classes and onto the practice fields. Were they liabilities to the other athletes' health and safety? You bet your ukulele they were!

Safety aside, the mere gifting of these deadly sweets is itself a major problem. We confirmed with Johnston that the gifts included some "fun size" individual candies, and as we all know, under the purview of the NCAA, fun is completely illegal.

The Hawaii compliance director is out of the office (we checked) and thus unavailable for comment. If she knew what horrible accusations against the Warriors await her, she might not come back to the office. We wouldn't blame her.

 

[Note: if you took this article seriously, you're an idiot.]

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com