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Tag:Army
Posted on: August 26, 2011 2:27 am
Edited on: August 26, 2011 10:12 am
 

Dan Beebe responds to Texas A&M statement

Posted by Adam Jacobi

In the latest chapter in the ongoing flirtations between Texas A&M and the SEC, Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe (pictured at right) has responded to Texas A&M's Thursday announcement that the Aggies were exploring a switch in conferences.

First, the statement in full, from the conference offices:

The letter received today from Texas A&M president R. Bowen Loftin will be addressed by the Big 12 Conference Board of Directors. It remains our strong desire for Texas A&M to continue as a member of the Big 12 and we are working toward that end. However, if it is decided otherwise, the Conference is poised to move aggressively with options.

Beebe should be careful here, as the only high-level unaffiliated football programs out there are Notre Dame and BYU (no offense, Army or Navy), and saying the conference is "poised to move aggressively" implies that there's a willing candidate already in Beebe's mind. Yes, that almost certainly could mean SMU, who's practically begging for a BCS invite, but if the Big 12 adds Houston (as has allegedly been mentioned by the conference as a possibility before), the Conference USA brass might have the grounds to suggest that the Big 12 was admitting to interfering with Conference USA business, and that could mean the threat of legal action.

That said, it could also mean something much less litigious, like adding BYU and/or Notre Dame in football only, and either gently phasing in the other sports (as both schools have full pre-existing conference affiliations outside of football) or leaving it a football-only arrangement entirely. 

Not only that, there are probably plenty of expansion candidates off the metaphorical radar with which the Big 12 has had some sort of contact, and maybe Beebe has the sense that they're privately amenable to a conference change. Again, we're talking about off the radar, so it would be reckless to speculate (see: flat-out guess) on possible schools, but Beebe would be derelict in his duty as a conference commissioner if he didn't have a contingency plan for any type of expansion -- especially one based on how willing the other schools would be to move to the Big 12.

We'll say this, though: Texas A&M is still not even an applicant (much less a member or invitee) of the SEC yet. That's likely to change, but it hasn't yet. So if Dan Beebe can wrangle four of his conference members away from a potential Pac-16 in 2010, then somehow brink Texas A&M back from the bring of "SECession," he's got to be the biggest miracle worker among conference commissioners. Alas for Beebe, miracles are miracles for a reason, and this one's probably not going to happen.


Posted on: August 3, 2011 2:21 pm
Edited on: August 3, 2011 2:38 pm
 

Showtime, CBSSports.com to air Army-Navy series



Posted by Adam Jacobi

Without question, one of the most storied, most heralded rivalry games in college football history has been and continues to be Army-Navy. Yes, the days of Glenn Davis, Doc Blanchard, and Roger Staubach are long gone, but the legacy's still there -- as are the exemplary young men that populate each roster every year.

To that end, Showtime is teaming up with CBS Sports to produce a two-hour special on the rivalry, called A Game Of Honor, to be aired December 21 -- 11 days after the Black Knights and Midshipmen lock horns on the gridiron. Better yet, there's going to be other related programs and content about the special. Here's more info:

SHOWTIME will have behind-the-scenes access to both academies and their respective football teams for six months leading up to the Army-Navy game, as well as during the game and immediately following. With so many stories to tell, SHOWTIME will air exclusive content across multiple CBS platforms including a special preview show about the making of the docu-drama on Wednesday, November 23 on SHOWTIME; with a network television premiere of the preview show on CBS Sports on Saturday, December 3. In addition, CBSSports.com will air an exclusive 10-episode weekly original web series beginning Monday, October 17. 

Look, say what you will about the football teams themselves, but when you're talking about the actual players and what they're like off the field, it'll probably become pretty clear almost immediately that these guys are the real deal. The US Military Academy and US Naval Academy are about as prestigious as it gets, and the quality of man that comes out of those academies is the proof. On the field, we'll be seeing guys like linemen, linebackers, and running backs, but they're also future generals, CEOs, and lawmakers -- and some of the most disciplined people in America.

At the same time, we are still talking about college-aged kids, and while they're not exactly going through the "normal" college experience, they're also still learning to be adults, in a sense. Further, we're talking about young men in the military during wartime. Needless to say, that's the type of thing that weighs heavily on a lot of their minds, and so to have a game like this to act as an anchor, of sorts, to their lives over here is incredibly important. 

Moreover, the football's getting better. This isn't 20 years ago, when Navy was hapless and Army wasn't a whole lot better; Army just beat SMU (in the Mustangs' backyard) in the Armed Forces Bowl to finish at 7-6 last year, and Navy's been averaging nearly 9 wins a season since 2003. Ken Niumatalolo has been a revelation as head coach of the Midshipmen, and Army brings back nearly every starting skill position player on offense. It's probably going to be a good game regardless of what level of locker room access fans get.

So to have that and this special (and all the additional content that'll be available on this website and on Showtime) is going to be truly special. These are two of the most compelling college football programs today, and A Game Of Honor ought to be a fitting reflection of that.  

Posted on: August 1, 2011 2:53 pm
 

VIDEO: Randy Moss incinerates Army's secondary

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The NFL world is a little poorer today than it was yesterday, as longtime Vikings/Patriots WR (and Marshall alum) Randy Moss announced his retirement earlier. Moss was a free agent at the time, and from the sound of it, the situation in front of him was sufficiently dire that retirement seemed like the best option.

If his retirement is permanent (and not one of those Brett Favre annual retirements), that's a bummer. Moss is 34 now, which means he's lost a couple steps, but even still, he's one hell of a wideout, one who's able to embarrass an opposing cornerback here or there.

So let's look back at a time when Randy Moss' legs were still young and fresh. Oh, and instead of an NFL defense to face, let's pit him against, let's say, late-'90s Army. 3rd and 2 for Marshall at its own 10. What's the worst that can happen?



Oh. Ohhhh. Mach 2 Fireball Death Machine Randy Moss is the worst that can happen. For those keeping score at home, that's a juke, an even better juke, a hurdle, a stiff-arm, and then otherworldly speed, all in one play. And it wasn't even Moss' only insane TD of the day.

It's not enough to say that college football doesn't get guys like Randy Moss very often. There really hasn't been one since. The closest you could get was probably 2004 Braylon Edwards at Michigan, and while Edwards was making some sensational plays in the iconic 1 jersey for the Wolverines, well, he never came close to what Moss did there.

Of course, any discussion of Randy Moss' college career is incomplete without mentioning why it was it's no accident that Moss ended up at tiny Marshall and not a big-name program. Moss originally signed with Notre Dame, but got in a nasty fight during his senior year that ended in a felony charge -- and a denial of enrollment by the school. Moss instead enrolled at Florida State, but was ruled ineligible for his freshman year due to transfer rules. He then tested positive for marijuana during his probation for the aforementioned fight, earning him a dismissal from FSU. So while it's a shame his skills were only on display for Marshall, it was pretty much entirely Moss' fault.

That all said, Moss stayed out of trouble at Marshall, and excelled on the field as a result. For that, we've got that insane play to show for it, and a richer college football history as a whole. Happy trails, Mr. Moss. 
Posted on: June 29, 2011 3:10 pm
Edited on: June 30, 2011 5:28 pm
 

LaBelle files countersuit against Army's King

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Singer Patti LaBelle has filed a countersuit against former Army cornerback Richard King.

As you may recall, King recently found himself in an altercation -- there is video of the incident in our original post -- with some of LaBelle's bodyguards at a Houston airport earlier this month. An altercation that resulted in King suffering a concussion and being suspended for a year from the football team, effectively ending his football career at West Point. As if all that wasn't enough, King was also sent into active duty.

Now, following the lawsuit that King filed against LaBelle, LaBelle has filed a countersuit against King.

LaBelle claims in the suit that King peppered her with racial insults before she ordered her bodyguards to beat him up, for which he is suing her.

King reportedly was beaten while he was in his hometown, Houston, for spring break on March 11. According to a lawsuit filed by King, he was beaten after LaBelle thought he was standing too close to her luggage at the airport.

At the time, LaBelle’s people claimed that King – who would have been a fifth-year senior this fall – was drunk, disorderly and causing problems.

I guess giving King another concussion -- one of many he has suffered from, as he missed his entire junior season due to concussions -- while having her security guards beat him down and then getting him sent into active duty wasn't enough. 

As I said in my original post on this story, I'm inclined to believe that if the Army has sent King back into active duty that there must be more to the story that we have not seen or heard. Still, when watching the video of the altercation, to me it doesn't look like King was doing anything that warranted the beating he received. I've no idea what, if anything, he said to LaBelle or her bodyguards as there's no audio, but I believe King has suffered enough -- maybe more than -- for whatever happened that day.

To file a lawsuit against him, even if it's just retaliation for the one he's filed against LaBelle, seems plain cruel to me. 

Posted on: June 4, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Army CB's celebrity encounter ends w/ concussion

Posted by Tom Fornelli

This is likely going to be one of the strangest stories you hear involving a college football player this year. Army cornerback Richard King found himself in an altercation with singer Patti LaBelle's bodyguards at an airport in Houston, and wound up with a concussion. A scary situation for King, as he missed his entire junior season after suffering multiple concussions during his sophomore year.

Making matters worse for King, the punishment he has received from West Point for the incident is a year suspension from the football team, which ends his football career. Though that's not nearly as bad as the fact he's also being sent into active duty.

Here's the details of the story from HudsonValley.com:

King, who was home from spring break, filed a  lawsuit this week, suing LaBelle, saying she ordered her bodyguards to beat him up as he waited for a ride home outside a terminal at Bush Intercontinental Airport. The lawsuit, which was obtained by the Associated Press, says LaBelle believed King was standing too close to her “(no doubt expensive) luggage, even though he was oblivious to her presence and the danger he was in.”

Check out the surveilliance video and be the judge. King is shown being pummeled by three bodyguards. It appears some pushing was involved before the altercation.

LaBelle’s limousine driver told Houston police King hit him after he asked King to back away from the limo that LaBelle was in. The driver and a bodyguard told police King appeared to be intoxicated. One of King’s lawyers admits King had a few drinks but denied he was intoxicated.

King answered, “No,” when he was asked by an ABC News reporter if he was drunk.

Here is the surveillance video mentioned in the article. The altercation begins around the 1:30 mark and takes place at the bottom of the video.



As you can clearly tell in the video, King did not appear to be okay after trying to get up after being knocked into a concrete pillar. Obviously, without audio, we can't really be clear what was going on in the video, though at the time the pushing and shoving started it looks like King is just talking on his cell phone. I know I didn't see the alleged punch King threw at the limo driver.

Still, you have to think that there was something more to this story than we saw or is being reported. After all, the Army has decided to punish King -- who it's said has suffered upwards of ten concussions -- into active duty. That would seem to be a rather harsh punishment for somebody who got beat up by three bodyguards. 

Hat tip: CFT 

Posted on: June 2, 2011 4:00 pm
 

2011 SEC on CBS schedule announced

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We're still three months away from the 2011 college football season starting, but it's never too early to begin planning your Saturday afternoons this fall. So luckily for you, I'm here to help. CBS announced it's SEC on CBS schedule for the year, along with other games that will be broadcast on CBS, and it features the excellent SEC matchups you've come to expect from CBS.

Here's a look at what you'll be seeing this fall.

- 9/17 Florida vs. Tennessee 3:30PM, ET
- 10/1 SEC Doubleheader 3:30PM, ET and 8PM, ET
- 10/29 Florida vs. Georgia 3:30PM, ET
- 11/12 SEC Doubleheader Noon, ET and 3:30PM, ET
- 11/25 LSU vs. Arkansas 2:30PM, ET
- 12/3 SEC Championship 4PM, ET
- 12/10 Army vs. Navy 2:30PM, ET
- 12/31 Sun Bowl 2PM, ET 

As for the Saturdays in between, don't worry, we aren't giving Verne Lundquist, Gary Danielson and Tracy Wolfson those Saturdays off. There will be SEC games on CBS those Saturdays, but the matchups will not be announced until six to twelve days before the games. This way we can assure you'll be seeing the best SEC football on CBS every week. The same can be said of the matchups for our two doubleheaders this season.

Now all you have to do is wait three months.

Posted on: May 25, 2011 12:46 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 9:57 am
 

CBSSports.com College Football 100: 100-91

By the Eye on College Football bloggers

To celebrate the 100 days remaining until the first Saturday of the new college football season, this is the CBSSports.com College Football 100: our countdown of the 2011 season's 100 most influential players, coaches, administrators, venues, or any other related
things in college football. It's like that other "most influential" list, but, you know, more important. Also: it's supposed to be fun. Enjoy.

100. THE DOOLEY RULE, new NCAA regulation.
We don’t know when; we don’t know where. But we’re betting that at some point this season, college football’s new Dooley Rule -- which punishes offenses that commit a penalty in the last minute of either half with a 10-second runoff from the game clock -- makes a major impact on the outcome of a game. If it’s the right game, the rule could make a major impact on the outcome of college football’s entire season.

That’s not necessarily likely, of course. Until namesake Derek Dooley’s Tennessee team lost last year’s Music City Bowl when North Carolina stopped the clock with its own penalty, the situation hadn’t yet seemed to occur in a high-profile college football game. (There’s a reason it took until 2011 for the rule to be put into place.) But now that it’s there, we think the odds are good that we’ll see it put into practice this fall … and that the losing coach will be sure to let us know about it. -- JH

99. JARED HASSIN, running back, Army. For the last nine years, Army has fallen short of toppling their Navy counterparts. Could 2011 be the year that the Black Knights finally get over the hump? If they do, it will likely be thanks to the efforts of Hassin. He broke out in a big way his sophomore season, racking up 1,013 yards and 9 touchdowns, helping lead Army to their first postseason appearance since 1996 and first bowl win since 1985.

Hassin was originally enrolled in the Air Force Academy before transferring back to Army (his original commitment) and sitting out 2009. It was an odd recruitment, especially for the son of an Army graduate. But regardless of the process, the lifelong Army football fan is now playing for the team he grew up loving. He is undisputedly one of the most important players on the Black Knights, and fans hope the 6-3, 235-pound back can flash the historic rivalry back to the late 80's and early 90's, when Army took 9 of 11 from the Midshipmen. -- CP

98. GUNNER KIEL, quarterback, Columbus (Ind.) East High School. The nation's top quarterback in the class of 2012 and number two overall prospect according to MaxPreps analyst Tom Lemming, Kiel holds a scholarship offer from just about every program in the country. The 6-foot-4, 210 pound signal-caller is ideal for just about any kind of system and has a good arm, throws the ball accurately and is a natural born leader on the field.

Kiel comes from a long line of quarterbacks - his uncle Blair played at Notre Dame and in the NFL and both of his brothers play the position in college - and the next in line might be the most talented out of all of them. His recruitment, as one would expect from a top prospect, is not being played out in the public as he is trying to keep things close to the vest. Oklahoma, Indiana, Missouri and Alabama are a few of the schools making a strong push for his services but it will be well into the season (or after it) before he ends up making a decision; expect to hear plenty about it as 2011 progresses. -- BF

More CFB 100
Related Links

97. RYAN TANNEHILL, quarterback, Texas A&M. The Aggies had two different seasons in 2010: one B.T. (Before Tannehill) and one A.T. (After Tannehill). With Jerrod Johnson at quarterback, the Aggies were 3-3 on the season, and 0-3 in Big 12 play. Then Tannehill took over the reins against Kansas on Oct. 23 and Texas A&M didn't look back. The Aggies reeled off six straight wins, including games over Oklahoma, Nebraska and (the coup de gras) Texas. They wouldn't know defeat under Tannehill until the Cotton Bowl, where LSU won 41-24.

Still, Tannehill was a revelation. Not only was he able to run a rather potent Aggies offense, but he did so without the crippling turnovers that became a trademark of Texas A&M under Johnson. This season will be different for Tannehill, however. No longer is he the former tight end-turned-savior, but the quarterback who is supposed to make sure Texas A&M takes the next step--its first league title since 1998, and just their second Big 12 title ever. -- TF

96. GREG MATTISON, defensive coordinator, Michigan. One could certainly make the argument that it was the continuing ineptitude of former defensive coordinator Greg Robinson that cost former head coach Rich Rodriguez his job in Ann Arbor. After all, Robinson's latter year spearheading the Wolverine defense was, by far, the worst in points allowed in Michigan history; the former was the third-worst (and just for good measure, the second-worst season came in Rich-Rod's first season, with one-and-done Scott Shafer as DC). Yes, Michigan has an unusually stingy history of defense, but that's just the thing: Michigan fans have every reason to expect that stingy defense. That's just how it's done at Michigan.

It'll be up to Mattison, then, to keep Brady Hoke's seat cool, and he's got the pedigree to do it. Mattison is entering his 35th year of assistant coaching defense and his 16th as a defensive coordinator, and he's been a part of some very successful defenses (Florida's '06 BCS Championship team, for one). Fans shouldn't expect miracles and shutouts on Day 1 or even in Year 1, but they're going to need to see some sense this year that Michigan's old way of football is coming back. Getting the points per game allowed back under 27.5 for the first time since 2007 would be a good start. -- AJ

95. TYLER BRAY, quarterback, Tennessee. Give the sophomore gunslinger from California this: he doesn't lack for confidence. From the moment he stepped into Tennessee's starting lineup as a true freshman in midseason 2010, Bray carried himself with a swagger that paid big dividends in the Volunteers' season-ending, bowl-salvaging four-game winning streak--a streak in which Bray threw for 12 touchdowns and better than 1,200 yards. Behind four more Bray scoring strikes, the Vols nearly upset UNC in their bowl game (see above), raising expectations for even bigger things in 2011.

But Bray might have taken a little too much self-belief into spring, where he finished an up-and-down camp with a miserable 5-for-30 performance in the Orange-White Game. If he can harness his confidence and continue building on last year's impressive debut, the Vols could be major spoilers in a logjammed SEC East. If not, one of the nation's proudest programs could slip below .500 for the third time in four years. -- JH

94. JON EMBREE, head coach, Colorado. After a disastrous experience with an outsider as head coach in Dan Hawkins, Colorado turned to someone with a strong connection to the program in Embree, a former tight end and assistant coach for the Buffs. He's never been a head coach before but his fiery attitude and pledge to bring back several school traditions have already gotten players and alumni fired up for the upcoming season.

Embree has his work cut out for him though, with Colorado coming off a 5-7 season and transitioning to a new league, the Pac-12. He installed a pro-style offense during the spring and has his staff hitting the recruiting trail hard over the past few months to get word out about the program. The schedule is tough, hosting Oregon and going to both Ohio State and Stanford, but Embree has a senior quarterback in Tyler Hansen and a few solid pieces to build around. Expectations are rising in Boulder and while it might be too much to ask of Embree to turn everything around in his first year, he sure will make things more interesting up in the mountains. -- BF

93. SAVON HUGGINS, running back, Rutgers. Huggins enters his true freshman season with the Scarlet Knights with high expectations from the Rutgers fan base. At their spring game in April, Huggins drew about as much fanfare in his street clothes as the boys in pads. Huggins was one of the few big signing day steals for head coach Greg Schiano, and the Maxpreps No. 1-ranked running back should be an immediate upgrade for the Big East's worst rushing offense in 2010.

Fans are not the only ones anxiously awaiting Huggins' arrival. The coaching staff failed to identify any kind of order for the position in the post-spring depth chart. When Huggins suits up for fall camp, he will have as much of a chance to play as the three current backs on the chart. Hailing from nearby Jersey City, NJ, Huggins is the new face of Rutgers football. If he doesn't pan out into the star Schiano is hoping for, the 2006 Coach of the Year might find himself suddenly on a warmer seat in Piscataway. -- CP

92. QUALCOMM STADIUM, home field, San Diego State. Thanks to years of incompetence from its regular Aztec tenants, the former Jack Murphy Stadium's most prominent ties to college football have been the Holiday Bowl and (more recently) the Poinsettia Bowl. And those aren't insiginificant, particularly considering some of the classics that have been played in the Holiday.

But that should change this year. SDSU is poised for potentially their biggest season in school history, with senior quarterback Ryan Lindley and sophomore running back Ronnie Hillman forming the most dynamic QB-RB combo in the Mountain West. To win the conference the Aztecs will have to go through both TCU and Boise State, but wouldn't you know it--both MWC frontunners must visit Qualcomm this year, the Frogs Oct. 8 and Broncos Nov. 19. With two chances for the Aztecs, don't be surprised if "the Q" plays host to this year's version of Nevada-Boise, the upset that turns the non-AQ BCS chase on its head. -- JH

91. PAUL RHOADS, head coach, Iowa State. When Paul Rhoads took over as head coach at Iowa State in 2009, replacing Gene Chizik -- whatever happened to that guy? -- he was walking into a tough situation. The Cyclones had only won five games in the previous two seasons, but the man who grew up 20 miles outside Ames led the team to seven wins in 2009, including a win over Minnesota in the Insight Bowl. Iowa State took a step back in 2010, but did get a huge win over Texas and narrowly lost to Nebraska in overtime.

In 2011, however, the time for moral victories has passed. While the Cyclones have won 12 games under Rhoads in his first two seasons, only six have come against conference opponents, four of them coming against former Big 12 North teams. Now the Cyclones will no longer have seasons in which they don't have to play Texas and Oklahoma, so winning in the conference won't be easy. Of course, it's not like anybody is expecting Iowa State to compete for the conference title every season, but if Iowa State wants to be better than a program that makes the occasional bowl appearance, Rhoads is going to have to do more than pull off the occasional shocker. -- TF

Check back tomorrow at Eye on College Football for Nos. 90-81 on the countdown, and follow us on Twitter.




Posted on: May 17, 2011 11:16 am
 

Teams to watch for turnover trouble

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We're certainly not breaking any news when we tell you that turnover margin is, yes, the kind of statistic that can make or break a team's season or -- for regular readers of Phil Steele and the numbers-minded like -- one that fluctuates from season-to-season nearly at random. While elite teams like Pete Carroll's mid-decade USC squads can end up consistently on the positive side of turnover margin, this correlation study at College Football News concludes that for most teams, it's more about the bounce of the ball:
[I]t's clear that for most teams, the turnover margin they enjoy one year has virtually zero predictive value for the turnover margin they will enjoy the next year. That means that on average, teams with substantially positive margins will see major decline in margin the next year, and teams with substantially negative margins will see major improvement the next year. A team with a -10 turnover margin in 2009, for example, would have an expected turnover margin of -1.2 in 2010, an improvement of nearly a full turnover per game!
Again, it's not a surprising conclusion (though that "nearly a full turnover per game" number deserves the exclamation point). But it's worth emphasizing that as we start to look towards the 2011 season, we pay a particularly skeptical eye towards teams with gaudy -- and likely unsustainable -- 2010 turnover margins. Here's a few:

Tulsa (+17). The Golden Hurricane are likely to be among the Conference USA favorites thanks to the 1-2 punch of quarterback G.J. Kinne and receiver/returner Damaris Johnson, but their no-huddle attack has always been something of a turnover slot machine and the overhaul  on the coaching staff won't help limit mistakes.

Connecticut (+12). No one's expecting a repeat trip to the Fiesta Bowl, but Paul Pasqualoni might have an even more difficult job ahead of him than expected. With quarterback Zach Fraser gone and the defense unlikely to come up with 31 takeaways again, just staying on the positive side will be an accomplishment.

Army (+16). The Black Knights are in better shape under Rich Ellerson, program-wise, than they've been in ages. But as the study points out, it's tough to expect a team that's averaged a -5 finish over the past eight years to turn in overwhelmingly positive margins two years running.

Maryland (+15). The Terps finished tied for fifth in the nation in fewest giveaways, and while some of that was steady quarterbacking by Danny O'Brien, some of it was also an amazing four fumbles lost all season. (Only Ohio State and Wisconsin lost fewer.) A repeat performance in that department is highly, highly unlikely.

Oregon (+13), Oklahoma State (+12). Many national title contenders are able to rely on year-in, year-out success in the turnover department -- Alabama has been +36 over the past three seasons, Ohio State an incredible +48 in that span -- but in the cases of the Ducks and Cowboys, their 2010 margins reperesented a quantum leap forward; they finished at +2 and 0 the year before, respectively, with neither better than +5 the year before that.

If either is going to make their expected BCS push in 2011 (or another one, in Oregon's case), they'll have to show that 2010 was the start of a Buckeye- or Tide-like trend rather than a fortunate one-off.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com