Tag:Ball State
Posted on: January 19, 2011 3:13 pm
 

Headset Reset: Five new faces in the MAC

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

"Headset Reset " is the College Football Blog's series reviewing the 22 new head coaches in the FBS and what they'll need to accomplish in their new jobs to succeed. In this edition: the five new head coaches in the MAC.

DON TREADWELL, Miami (Ohio) (pictured)

Why him? Because few assistant coaches in the country had a better 2010 than Treadwell, who turned a collection of average-looking talent into one of the Big Ten's most effective offenses at Michigan State and added a couple of victories as the Spartans' interim head coach to boot. For 2011, Treadwell needs to: capitalize on the momentum built by Mike Haywood's amazing 9-win turnaround in Oxford. A second straight MAC title isn't a necessity, but the pieces are in place for the kind of solid, winning season that would stamp the RedHawks as a contender for years to come. By 2014, Treadwell needs to have: won the MAC. With so much coaching turnover, there's a power vaccum at the top of the conference, and no reason Miami can't fill it. Chances Treadwell gets what he needs? Good-to-very good. Haywood left behind an excellent foundation and Treadwell's work in East Lansing suggests he's just the man to build upon it.

PETE LEMBO, Ball State

Why him? At just 40 years of age, Lembo already has 10 years of head coaching experience (all at the FCS level, no less) and just finished resuscitating a truly rotten Elon program. For 2011, Lembo needs to: just move the Cardinals in the right direction. Stan Parrish's dreadful two-season reign-of-error means Lembo has to get the program walking towards, say, not losing to Eastern Michigan before it runs towards bowls and league titles. By 2014, Lembo needs to have: put the Cardinals in position for a postseason berth; the Brady Hoke era showed it's far from impossible for the right coach. Chances Lembo gets what he needs? Not bad. BSU's not an easy gig, but Lembo's energy and FCS success mean he could be a sneakily good hire.

STEVE ADDAZIO, Temple

Why him? Not his efforts running the Florida offense, that's for sure, but his top-notch recruiting expertise, Northeast ties, and Urban Meyer -trained CEO skills won him the job all the same. For 2011, Addazio needs to: put together a coaching staff -- particularly at the coordinator positions -- that can take advantage of Addazio's good work on the recruiting trails. Maintaining Temple's perch near the top of the MAC East would be a nice signal that Al Golden's tenure wasn't a fluke, too. By 2014, Addazio needs to have: gotten the Owls back to a couple of bowl games; anything else would be a terrible waste of Golden's remarkable work. Chances Addazio gets what he needs? Better than you'd think. There's a reason Meyer tabbed Addazio as his replacement during his sabbatical; he's got the leadership skills necessary to head up a successful program ... if he can just find someone to call his plays for him.

DAVE DOEREN, Northern Illinois

Why him? NIU can't ask for a whole lot more than a long-time successful Big Ten defensive coordinator fresh off a visit to the Rose Bowl. For 2011, Doeren needs to: win the MAC? Those are high expectations for a first-time head coach, but the Huskies were the league's best team in 2010 and their offense returns almost entirely intact. By 2014, Doeren needs to have: won the MAC, no question mark. With the offensive talent left behind by Jerry Kill and Doeren's defensive acumen, the Huskies should find a way to finish what they started in 2010. Chances Doeren gets what he needs? Solid; none of the other new MAC coaches steps into a situation quite this friendly, and Doeren's defensive pedigree is promising.

DARRELL HAZELL, Kent State

Why him? No one the Golden Flashes could have hired knows the Ohio recruiting scene better than the longtime Buckeye receivers coach and recruiting ace. For 2011, Hazell needs to: find a difference-maker or two. KSU's been close to getting over the bowl hump, going 5-7 each of the past two seasons; if Hazell can recruit just a handful of actual play-makers, he could get them there in short order. By 2014, Hazell needs to have: reached the postseason. It would be a huge milestone for woebegone program that's had just two winning seasons since 1977, and has never played in a bowl as an FBS program. Chances Hazell gets what he needs? Like Addazio, it'll depend on who Hazell can hire for his staff, since he has no coordinating experience. But the talent level in Kent should definitely rise on his watch.

Posted on: January 19, 2011 11:10 am
 

"Longhorn Network" to be unveiled today

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Hey, remember when Notre Dame's exclusive deal with NBC was seen as an earth-shaking development in the world of college football? Those days seem so carefree and innocent now, what with the Sports Business Daily reporting that Texas will officially unveil the new "Longhorn Network" today , a partnership with ESPN that will create the first 24-hour channel devoted exclusively to a single university's athletics.

Per the SBD, the network will be ...
the first-of-its-kind channel to broadcast live UT athletic events, shoulder programming and non-sports university content. The Longhorn Network will launch in the fall and will be owned by ESPN, which will pay the school a rights fee that averages $15M a year, sources said. In addition, ESPN has committed close to $400M in production value to the channel over the 20-year term.
Total amount of money flowing directly into Texas's coffers over the next 20 years? $300 million.

But even that's chump change compared to the prestige and influence the 'Horns promise to wield with their own network to flout. There's still plenty of questions to be asked and answered of the new enterprise -- How many homes can the WWL force the channel into? Will it actually broadcast any live football games? Can it turn a profit? How many people will tune in for "Mack Brown Live, And We Mean Live Right Now: 30 Minutes of Mack Brown Doing His Taxes"? -- but it's hard to see how it isn't a major, major feather in the Longhorns' media cap.

The story might be most substantial, though, as a simple milestone. Analysts have long predicted that in the distant future, we'd be capable of watching only our favorite teams all the time. So 20 years from now, when you're checking out "Cardinalvision: Your 24/7 Television Home for Ball State Athletics," remember that it all got started today.
Posted on: January 11, 2011 4:47 pm
Edited on: January 11, 2011 7:38 pm
 

Michigan must give Hoke a chance to succeed

Posted by Tom Fornelli

He's not the man Michigan may have wanted with its first choice, but as things stand, Brady Hoke is the new head coach in Ann Arbor.  He's the 19th coach in the school's history, and though some members of the Michigan fan base may respond with "Who?" upon hearing his name, he's not simply an afterthought.

Of course Les Miles or Jim Harbaugh would be Dave Brandon's first choice.  They are the quintessential "Michigan Men" that seems to be so important in Ann Arbor.  They've played at the school. Miles coached at the school, and he even has a national championship under his belt. Jim Harbaugh hasn't done either, but he was the coach du jour this winter.  And one with Michigan roots at that. Hoke isn't the definition of a "Michigan Man," as he played his college ball at Ball State, but he did spend eight seasons coaching Michigan's defensive line.  Including the 1997 season, the last time Michigan won a national championship. So he knows what it takes to win in Ann Arbor, as he's done it before. 

There's another difference between Les Miles, Jim Harbaugh and Brady Hoke other than their "Michigan Man" credentials, and it is probably something that is a lot more important than where either played college football.

Brady Hoke wants to be at Michigan.  It's clear that after two failed attempts to land him that Les Miles doesn't.  He may say he does, as he doesn't want to denigrate where he came from, but Miles is happy at LSU. He knows he can win there, and he's not sure that he can do the same at Michigan.  Harbaugh always had his sight set on the NFL, and now he's got his dream job.

Michigan is Brady Hoke's dream job.

Brady Hoke seems to believe he can win in Ann Arbor, and what reason do we really have to doubt him?  He took over his alma mater in 2003 and turned the program around in six seasons, leading the team to a 12-1 campaign in 2008.  Hoke then left for San Diego State, and Ball State hasn't won 12 games since.  Hell, they haven't won seven games since.

Hoke then took over a San Diego State program that had been dormant since Marshall Faulk was tearing apart defenses, and in two seasons turned the program around and led the Aztecs to a 9-4 mark in 2010.  Including a win over Navy in the Poinsettia Bowl.

Do you notice a trend here?  Hoke has gone to programs that were trending downward and built them back up.  Sure, there's a difference between the Big Ten and the MAC and Mountain West.  There's no denying this, but there's also a difference in building a program up when there's that block "M" on your hat and not the Ball State or San Diego State logo.

As long as Michigan gives Hoke some time, and I know it will be tough considering the down times of the Rich Rodriguez era, he will get this program on the right track.  Will he lead them to a national championship?  Only time will tell, but here's something else that Michigan fans should remember before dumping all over the Hoke hire.

Jim Tressel wasn't Ohio State's first choice after it fired John Cooper. He was just some coach from tiny Youngstown State. How's that worked out for them?
Posted on: December 20, 2010 9:25 am
 

Kent State to hire Ohio State's Hazell

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

As the old saying goes: if you can't beat 'em, hire 'em away.

So with the rest of Ohio now 0-for-the-last-89-years against the neighborhood bully in Columbus, it's no surprise that Kent State (out of Kent, Ohio, natch) has looked to the staff of Ohio State for their next head coach, Buckeye receivers coach and assistant head coach Darrell Hazell. Hazell is due to be announced as the new coach of the Golden Flashes at a press conference set for 3 p.m. EST later today, having won the job over co-finalists Curt Cignetti, the Alabama wide receivers coach, and Bobby Kennedy, the Texas receivers coach. (One way or another, safe to say the Golden Flashes were going to get some high-quality receiving coaching next year.)

With Hazell installed at Kent, Pete Lembo at Ball State, and Dave Doeren at Northern Illinois, only Temple and Miami (OH) are still looking for coaches following what might be called the Great MAC Coaching Upheaval of 2010.

Hazell comes to Kent having been with Jim Tressel's Buckeyes since 2004 and with experience as the assistant head coach at both Ohio State and his previous stop at Rutgers. But the likely decisive factor in his hire is his knowledge of the rich Ohio recruiting scene, honed not only from his years under Tressel but his three-year stint as the Oberlin College offensive coordinator from 1989-1991.

And what team just-so-happens to be that last Ohio team to beat Ohio State? Oberlin, by a 7-6 score back in 1921 . If Hazell can reproduce anything remotely like that kind of magic, he won't be at Kent for long.

Posted on: December 19, 2010 7:02 pm
 

Ball State hires Pete Lembo

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The last few weeks it seems like there's been a mass exodus of coaches leaving the MAC conference.  Jerry Kill left Northern Illinois for Minnesota, Al Golden said goodbye to Temple to take the Miami job, and Mike Haywood left Miami (OH) to take over in Pittsburgh.  So far this offseason Ball State was the only school in the conference to lose its head coach by choice, and now it has found a replacement.

Ball State announced on Sunday that it had hired Pete Lembo to take over the program.

"We are extremely excited to have Pete Lembo join the Ball State family,” said Ball State athletic director Tom Collins in a statement. “The search for our next football coach included talking to a number of people in the football world. Coach Lembo’s name and credentials continued to surface as an outstanding candidate for Ball State University. We are looking forward to his contribution to the program and looking forward to getting started in preparation for Ball State football 2011.”

Lembo comes to Ball State from Elon, where he went 35-22 in five seasons.  Before that Lembo was the head coach at Lehigh, going 44-14 in five seasons. Ball State will be the first time Lembo has coached on the FBS level, either as a head coach or assistant.  Of course, considering it's Ball State, he probably won't even notice the difference.
Posted on: November 24, 2010 11:26 am
 

Brady Hoke has talked to Minnesota

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It's starting to look like Minnesota may finally be moving closer to their goal of finding a new head coach.  According to a few reports, San Diego State head coach Brady Hoke talked to an official from the University of Minnesota about the head coaching job over the weekend.  Hoke wouldn't go into details when asked about any meetings, but he did admit that a meeting took place.

"I did have an informal conversation about an opening that's out there," said Hoke. The Aztecs coach also said he wasn't going into any details "out of respect for that other school and the kids we have here that we're 100 percent committed to and will stay committed to."

Which sounds nice, but I'm not exactly sure how you can say you're 100 percent committed to the kids you currently have about 15 seconds after you admit you just talked to another school about another job.  Don't get me wrong, I'm not blaming Hoke for taking the meeting, I would too.


As for who Hoke had the meeting with, Monday Night Football sideline reporter Michelle Tafoya said on her radio show Tuesday that she shared a plane from San Diego back to Minnesota with a few familiar faces. Those faces being Minnesota athletic director Joel Maturi and his assistant Dave Mona. Though I suppose it's possible that they were just in San Diego for the weekend on holiday.

Minnesota has said that it would like to have its head coaching search wrapped up before the holidays, and while the prospect of finding someone before Thursday doesn't seem strong, it's possible that the school could have its coach by the end of next week.  After all, when Hoke left Ball State to take over in San Diego, he did so at the end of the regular season and before the bowl game.

It's not crazy to think he'd do it again.
Posted on: November 23, 2010 11:28 am
 

Report: Stan Parrish out at Ball State

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It looks like the MAC is about to lose its second head coach in as many days.  On Monday it was announced that Kent State head coach Doug Martin had turned in his resignation, saying that he'd finish the 2010 season and then step down as head coach.  Now, on Tuesday, the word out of Muncie, Indiana is that Ball State head coach Stan Parrish will be let go as well.

Ball State appears ready to pull the plug on the brief Stan Parrish football coaching era.

Two sources told The Star Press that negotiations haven taken place between the coach and university officials this week to determine parameters for a separation.The sources asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to speak about the situation.

Parrish did not return multiple messages seeking comment on his status.


Parrish took over the job in December of 2008 after Brady Hoke left to take his current job at San Diego State.  The Cardinals went 2-10 in 2009, and finished the 2010 season 4-8, and the team has gone 5-11 in MAC play under Parrish.  Which, to be honest, isn't all that surprising.  Parrish's last head coaching job in what we now call the FBS, but back in the days of lore was known as Division I, was at Kansas State from 1986 to 1988.

His teams went 2-30-1 during three seasons, including two winless campaigns in 1987 and 1988.
Posted on: November 14, 2010 2:32 am
 

What I learned from the Big Ten (Nov. 13)

Posted by Adam Jacobi

1. The Iowa defense is the biggest fraud in the Big Ten. Credit must go to Dan Persa and Northwestern for their gutsy fourth-quarter comeback against the Iowa Hawkeyes, but it's time to stop lauding the Iowa defense as one of the nation's best, because it isn't -- not when the game is on the line. Iowa has given up game-winning drives -- and long, sustained ones, at that -- to three different opponents this season, and if it hadn't been for an unconscionable end zone drop by Indiana wideout Damario Belcher on 4th down last week, that total would be four, in just 10 games. It's one thing to hold lightweights like Iowa State and Eastern Illinois to just one score. It's another to get a stop when the team needs one the most, and Iowa's defense just doesn't seem capable of doing that.

2. Bret Bielema's empathy generator is broken. Quick, name the one Big Ten coach who would run up 83 points on a conference opponent. It's probably the same one that goes for two while up by 25 with under seven minutes to play, isn't it? Why yes it is. Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema continued his quest to get every mediocre coach in the Big Ten fired with an 83-20 firebombing of Indiana in Madison. And though Bielema will again claim not to be running up the score, it's worth pointing out that Scott Tolzien was throwing passes to fellow starters Lance Kendricks and David Gilreath with a 39-point lead and under five minutes left in the third quarter. Yes, it's up to Indiana to make the stop, and Indiana never did, but in a 63-point win, it's never good to see the winning team converting a 76-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter -- regardless of whether a backup threw it. Wisconsin, we're looking at you here.

3. There's plenty of Hawkeye fans in East Lansing. The Big Ten title race is down to three one-loss teams, and as of right now, Wisconsin owns the tiebreaker for the trip to Pasadena (or if all hell really breaks loose, Glendale, but let's assume Pasadena). Of the three teams, only one -- Ohio State -- faces a ranked team down the stretch, and that's OSU's trip to Iowa next weekend. If Iowa wins, all of a sudden, Michigan State has the upper hand for the league title. Ohio State wins, and we're back to the three-team non-round-robin tiebreaker, which is BCS standing. MSU is not such a big fan of that idea: the Spartans are firmly mired at third among Big Ten teams in that department. So yes, there's still plenty of endgame drama left in the Big Ten, even if it involves two teams that are at best longshots for the title.

4. Matt McGloin has "moxie," but Ohio State has a secondary. Advantage, OSU. It's hard to believe, looking at the 38-14 final score from Columbus, but Penn State actually led the Buckeyes 14-3 at the break, and it could have been worse. PSU QB Matt McGloin threw two touchdown passes in the first half, and unlike the two he threw in the second half, the first half scores were to his own team. Yes, things sort of fell off a cliff for Penn State, and the turning point was likely late in the first half, when Joe Paterno got greedy on 4th and 1 at the OSU 20 and went for it. The Evan Royster rush failed, the Buckeye defense's heart grew three sizes, and PSU never even threatened to score for the rest of the game.

It was a sobering return to reality for Penn State fans who witnessed McGloin's dissection of the Northwestern defense last week and were entertaining dreams of McGloin as a wildly successful three (or two-and-a-half, anyway) -year starter over true freshman Rob Bolden, Joe Paterno's choice at the beginning of the season. The fact of the matter is, there's usually plenty more to turning a struggling offense around than just making a switch at quarterback, and when Bolden's got a full year of film study and practice under his belt, he's probably going to be a better quarterback than McGloin. That fact doesn't have much relevance today, which is why McGloin started at Columbus and probably will next week, but it would be extremely presumptive to look at McGloin's first two quarters at OSU and attach a tag like "the future" to him -- unless the words "clipboard holder for Rob Bolden" immediately follow.

 
 
 
 
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