Tag:Jarrett Lee
Posted on: October 11, 2011 11:35 am
Edited on: October 11, 2011 11:36 am
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Keys to the Game: LSU at Tennessee

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

LSU WILL WIN IF: They do anything other than take careful aim at their own foot and blow it off. We've seen enough of both of these teams by now to know that down-to-down, play-to-play, drive-to-drive, the Tigers are the far superior team--especially considering the gigantic advantage LSU has in the running department, where Tennessee is the only team in the SEC averaging less than 100 yards per game. The only way LSU loses to the Vols is if the game becomes less about who's winning the down-to-down battle and more about who's capitalizing on the big play. The Bayou Bengals have made an art out of being that team under Les Miles, but all the same, if the Tigers blow a coverage for a long touchdown against Matt Simms ... if they allow a long return to dynamic Vol freshman Devrin Young ... if Jarrett Lee's old pick-six demons suddenly return to haunt him ... if those kinds of plays bring what could be an unhappy and dormant Neyland Stadium crowd to life ... the Vols could make this a game.

Unfortunately for the Vols, though, if LSU doesn't suffer any self-inflicted wounds, their advantages on both lines-of-scrimmage are such that they may not suffer any wounds at all.

TENNESSEE WILL WIN IF: Well, the aforementioned disaster scenario taking place on LSU's side of things would help immensely. But even in that case, the Vols will need something from their offense to actually pull out a victory. And with Simms in for the injured Tyler Bray, that means offensive coordinator Jim Chaney will have to find some way of snapping the Volunteer running game out of its current stupor. In the Vols two SEC games to date, Chaney's unit has totaled -- this is not a misprint -- minus-29 rushing yards. LSU's hardly the opponent you want to face when trying to fix that kind of problem, but the Vols don't have a choice: either get some measure of push up front, or watch the Tigers swallow your backup quarterback whole. Just ask Florida.

THE X-FACTOR: The echoes of last season. If there's one team the Vols might be irrationally confident about facing, even after last week's dud against Georgia, it's LSU. Despite entering that 2010 game as underdogs nearly as big as they are this year, Tennessee famously had Miles's team beaten until a replay review showed that the Vols had 13 players on the field for the game's chaotic final play--necessitating one more final play, on which the Tigers scored. If Derek Dooley can seize on that performance as reason to believe his Vols can play with the nation's No. 1 team -- and can get some early success to convince the crowd of the same -- they might just do it.

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Posted on: October 9, 2011 3:43 am
 

SEC Winners and Losers, Week 6



Posted by Jerry Hinnen

A handy recap of who (and what) really won and really lost in the SEC's Week 6.

WINNER: Les Miles.

For years, college football fans have come up with excuse after excuse for why Miles has been less than a terrifiic head football coach, despite his gaudy records and 2007 national title. He's just lucky. Anyone can recruit that kind of talent to LSU. His clock management is terrible. Never lost fewer than two games in a season. He can't get his offense fixed. Did we mention he's lucky? This offseason, one prominent blogger went so far as to place Miles No. 1 on a list of "the Worst Coaches in College Football."

But after today's dominating 41-11 win over Florida and the Tigers' 6-0 start to the 2011 season -- a start that includes wins over four different ranked teams -- even Miles's most ardent detractors have to admit the Mad Hatter has put together the kind of upper-upper-echelon team that can't be explained by recruiting or luck or happenstance alone. Yes, it helps to have Ryan Baker and Tyrann Mathieu and Michael Brockers around, but even superstars like those don't make the kind of terror-inducing defense LSU has today without the guidance of John Chavis, who Miles recruited to Baton Rouge personally. Yes, it's tough to not have a strong running game with Spencer Ware and a veteran line, but that running game wouldn't be nearly so effective if Jarrett Lee hadn't shaken off a career's worth of failures to become exactly the steady, accurate (and vs. the Gators, bomb-tossing) quarterback the offense needs--a development that can be directly traced to Miles's much-derided hire of Steve Kragthorpe as his team's new quarterbacks coach. The Tigers have been special teams killers for far too long under Miles to dismiss their contributions as mere "luck," as evidenced once again Saturday when punter Brad Wing noticed the lack of a Gator punt safety and took off for what should have been a 44-yard touchdown.

In short: to watch the Tigers' rise to 6-0 and their dismantling of the Gators and not see Miles's fingerprints all over them is an exercise in willful ignorance. Luck can explain some of his successes, and the natural advantages of being LSU does explain a little more. But these Tigers? They are only explained by having a coach at the very, very top of his field.

LOSERS: Auburn's wide receivers.

Tiger quarterback Barrett Trotter hasn't played well of late, and has the numbers to prove it--6 of 19 for 81 yards and a pick against Arkansas, to be specific. But he also hasn't gotten much help from his wideouts with leading receiver Emory Blake out ... if he's gotten any at all. Remove a 44-yard reception for Travante Stallworth on a second-half flea flicker completion, and Auburn's wideouts combined for all of three receptions for 21 yards. DeAngelo Benton had a particularly rough evening, dropping one late first-half pass that could have set up an Auburn field goal, getting called for a hold that would eventually force an Auburn punt, and letting a late Trotter pass whistle through his hands for the aformentioned interception.

WINNERS: Backup quarterbacks.

Jacoby Brissett aside, it was a good day to be a current (or recent) second-stringer in the SEC. Connor Shaw cemented himself as the new South Carolina starter and then some with his 311-yard, 4-touchdown, zero-pick performance vs. Kentucky. Mississippi State's Tyler Russell came off the bench to complete 11 of his 13 passes, three of them going for second-half touchdowns that turned what had been a 3-0 halftime deficit into a 21-3 win over UAB. Vanderbilt's Jordan Rodgers didn't have much of an impact statistically (11-of-18, 104 yards, 2 INTs), but led a couple of decent drives and looked as composed vs. the Alabama pass rush as you could hope.

And then there's Lee, who you'll remember was not only Jordan Jefferson's backup with just days remaining before the season, but many fans' favorite to drop to third-string behind JUCO transfer Zach Mettenberger. Against Florida Lee completed only 7 passes--but he also only attempted 10, and those 7 completions averaged a gain of 22 yards.

LOSER: Stephen Garcia.

The career of one of the SEC's most recognizable stars, magnetic talents, and frustrating enigmas appears poised to end not with a bang, but with a whimper. Though you can't ever say never with Steve Spurrier, Shaw's confident command performance against Kentucky suggests he's going to be the Gamecock quarterback for quite some time to come. There's going to be much more difficult opponents ahead for him than the hapless Wildcats, but does it matter? Spurrier's surprising patience with Garcia through his awkward start to this season now looks poised to be turned against him as Spurrier lets Shaw work through the same rough patches Garcia endured.

Which means that in the end, Garcia's senior season hasn't been undone by the off-field troubles that so many have expected to be his downfall. It's gone south because he simply hasn't produced on the field, because aside from one half against East Carolina, he's never looked as good in 2011 as Shaw looked Saturday. It's not how we expected things to come to an end for Garcia (if this is the end), but nothing about Garcia's time in Columbia has ever played out as expected, has it?

LOSERS: Kentucky fans.

The Wildcats kicked off to open their game against the Gamecocks, forced a fumble on the return, and recovered just outside the Carolina 20. Cue the shots in the stands of overjoyed Kentucky fans high-fiving each other and celebrating the best possible start.

60 minutes later -- and only 96 Wildcat yards, 6 Wildcat first downs, and 3 Wildcat points which came immediately following that fumble recovery later -- those same fans had to be some of the most miserable in the country. It's one thing to watch a poor football team; it's another to watch a team that seems so hopelessly outmatched on offense and doesn't seem to be showing any kind of week-to-week improvement. After failing to top 300 total yards against Louisville or Florida, the Wildcats have now failed to top 300 yards in their games against LSU and Carolina combined.

So about that kickoff: were those fans happy to have that one moment of joy? Or all the angrier for that joy being so completely misleading?

WINNER: Georgia's defense.

Before the game, we asked if the Bulldog secondary could live up its gaudy post-Boise State numbers against the likes of Tyler Bray and Da'Rick Rogers on the road at Tennessee. The answer: mostly. Bray and late-game injury replacement Matt Simms did throw for 290 yards at a perfectly respectable 7.3 yards-per-attempt clip, and without an interception.

But they never did throw a touchdown, either; in fact, the Volunteers were kept out of the end zone entirely until Simms snuck in from a yard out with only 2:45 to play in the game. Thanks to the Dawg defensive backs keeping the Vols in front of them, and the UGA front seven stuffing the pathetic Tennessee ground game to the tune of .4 yards per rush (yes, .4), Bray and Co. finished the game with all of 12 points on the scoreboard. The Bulldogs offense wasn't much to write home about -- Isaiah Crowell didn't even hit the 60-yard mark on the ground, the red zone offense sputtered, and like his Vol counterparts Aaron Murray threw neither an interception nor touchdown pass -- but after years of seeing their team score like a pinball machine only to lose after another lackluster defensive display, we expect Dawg fans will take it.

LOSER: Clarity in the SEC East.

South Carolina was the preseason favorite. They were the favorite after they beat Georgia. But then Garcia struggled and Florida beat Tennessee, and the Gators were the favorite. And then Carolina lost to Auburn and Florida lost to both Alabama, and lots of people considered Georgia as the new favorite. But now that Shaw looks to have healed the Gamecocks' Achilles heel ... are they the favorites? Or is Georgia, still, after beating Tennessee? Or is Florida just ripe to return once their schedule eases up? All we really know is that none of the other three teams is winning the division, and that the East winner is going to be a two-touchdown underdog to the West's come December. Past that? your guess is as good as ours.

WINNERS: Everyone who loves college football. Let's not go crazy by saying something like "LSU and Alabama isn't going to be the only game that matters in college football this season"; with Wisconsin, Stanford, Clemson, Boise State and of course Oklahoma all looking at potential undefeated seasons, it's too hasty to even lay claim to LSU and Alabama as the nation's best two teams.

That said: if you're a college football fan, and you've watched Alabama and LSU play this season, and you know how good they are, and you've considered how much fun it would be to watch them meet, undefeated, with a trip to Atlanta on the line on Nov. 5 ... then every week that passes with the two of them still unblemished is a good thing. This was one such week.





Posted on: October 8, 2011 7:14 pm
Edited on: October 8, 2011 7:20 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 1 LSU 41, No. 17 Florida 11

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



LSU WON: At halftime, the Bayou Bengals had just 211 yards of offense, had completed only two passes, and had suffered the FBS's first-ever touchdown overturned for a live-ball "unsportsmanlike conduct" celebration call (see below). They were also ahead 24-3, because they are LSU, and without John Brantley or backup Jeff Driskel, Florida isn't the same Florida they were earlier this season. True freshman Jacoby Brissett had a few moments under center, but at 8-of-14 for fewer than 100 yards and two interceptions, he couldn't keep Florida moving with any kind of consistency against LSU's typically ferocious defense.

WHY LSU WON: Whatever hope Florida had of winning this game without Brantley or Driskel relied on shutting down the LSU running game ... and the young Gators simply weren't up to it. The Tigers ran the ball a whopping 49 times and still averaged a healthy 4.9 yards per-carry, frequently whipping the Gators up front and pounding them with Spencer Ware's thumping running style. 

At no point was LSU's physical superiority more evident than on the Tigers' second drive of the game, which started on the LSU 43 and went like this: Ware for 13, Ware for 8, Florida offsides, Ware for 4, incompletion, Alfred Blue (pictured) for 13, Blue for 11, Ware for 1, Ware for 2 and the touchdown. That put LSU up 14-0, and Will Muschamp's decision to go for it on 4th-and-1 in his own territory on the Gators' ensuing possession showed just how firmly the LSU offensive front had already seized control of the game--and how desperate the Gators' situation already was.

WHEN LSU WON: The Gators had the faintest glimmer of hope when Brissett found Andre Debose for a 65-yard touchdown strike near the end of the third quarter, doubly so when an ingenious two-point play -- a direct snap to Chris Rainey as Brissett effectively faked a snap over his head -- cut the LSU lead to 27-11 and made the contest, hypothetically, a two-possession game. All of three plays later Jarrett Lee hit Rueben Randle for a 57-yard gain down the Florida 3, andthree plays after that Jordan Jefferson's jump-pass TD restored the lead to 34-11. Good night, Gators.

WHAT LSU WON: Another week at the top of the AP poll, no doubt, and another hurdle cleared on their to way to Nov 5's Game of the Century of the Year against Alabama.

WHAT FLORIDA LOST: Though no one will fault the Gators too badly for losing to the Tide and Tigers, they still count for two SEC losses--one more than either South Carolina or Georgia have at the moment, with both still to come on the schedule. And Muschamp can't be happy with how his team has been shoved around on both lines of scrimmage.

THAT WAS CRAZY: LSU's Australian punter Brad Wing probably wasn't expecting to become a footnote in college football history when he woke up Saturday morning, but that's what happened on a fake punt early in the second quarter. Wing was strolling towards the end zone for what would have been a 44-yard touchdown when he extended his arms in what may have been innocent celebration and may have been a slight taunt in the Gators' direction; either way, he was flagged for it, becoming the first-ever player to have a touchdown wiped off the board for a live-ball unsportsmanlike conduct penalty.

Posted on: October 1, 2011 3:41 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 1 LSU 35, Kentucky 7

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

LSU WON: SEC wins simply don't get more ho-hum than this. Kentucky gained just 59 yards of offense through three quarters and didn't penetrate any further than the LSU 47 until fewer than nine minutes remained, meaning that even as the LSU offense sputtered -- 8-of-21 passing for Jarrett Lee and fewer than 4 yards per-carry probably weren't what the home crowd had in mind -- their 7-0 lead at the end of the first quarter was never remotely threatened. The game had two bursts of excitement: when Jordan Jefferson came off the bench to sneak in from a yard out for that first LSU touchdown, and when budding Heisman candidate Tyrann Mathieu stripped replacement Wildcat quarterback Maxwell Smith, recovered the fumble, and returned it for his second touchdown of the season. 

WHY LSU WON: Because the collision of the impotent Kentucky offense and the ruthless LSU defense was as brutally one-sided as you'd expect. The Wildcats' first five drives all ended in three-and-outs as the Tiger defensive line crushed any efforts at running the ball -- their first nine attempts went for five yards or fewer -- and Kentucky starting quarterback Morgan Newton had been sacked twice before he completed his first pass ... on his 10th attempt. That Joker Phillips sent the true freshman Smith on for the second half ... against LSU ... down 14 ... in Death Valley should tell you the depths of the Wildcats' desperation.

The Wildcats' only realistic hope of getting on the board against LSU's first string was a turnover or huge special teams play. But the Tigers never lost a fumble or threw an interception, and committed just four penalties. The list of teams that can beat the Tigers when they commit that few mistakes is very, very short, and Kentucky most assuredly isn't on it.

WHEN LSU WON: The Tigers' 14-0 lead at halftime was more-or-less unassailable, but the win might as well have gone into the record books when they took their first drive of the second half 68 yards in 10 plays, capping it with a one-yard Alfred Blue plunge. At 21-0, Kentucky's chances of coming back were identical to their chances of coming back if the score was 437-0.

WHAT LSU WON: Another boost to Mathieu's All-American campaign, another notch in the win column, plenty of rest for the Tiger starters in the late-going. Aside from a little more crispness on offense, Les Miles couldn't have asked for much more.

WHAT KENTUCKY LOST: Just another bit of confidence in their offense to do anything against top-notch defensive competition. But given how little was expected of the Wildcats going on the road to face the No. 1 team in the nation, not much else.

Posted on: September 29, 2011 3:28 pm
Edited on: September 29, 2011 3:32 pm
 

So now what for Jordan Jefferson?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Jordan Jefferson is back, the senior quarterback having rejoined LSU's team (and even due to practice Thursday) after having his felony charges reduced to misdemeanor status by a grand jury Wednesday.
But getting back on the roster is only the beginning for Jefferson, whose final season in Baton Rouge still faces any number of questions. With the help of CBSSports.com LSU RapidReporter Glenn Guilbeau, here's the best answers to those questions we have at the moment:

Is Jefferson totally in the clear as far as suspensions go, then? Where Les Miles and the athletic department are concerned, yes. But associate athletic director Herb Vincent has said the LSU Dean of Students "has its own process" and could suspend Jefferson over the reduced simple battery charge. If the Dean the combination of Jefferson's high profile and relative lenience from the football program (remember that he remained free of public punishment until he was arrested) looks bad for the institution, there could be motivation for intervening.

But we doubt it's going to come to that. Expect Jefferson to remain on the active roster for the remainder of the season.

Could Jefferson play this Saturday against Kentucky? Miles seemingly changed his tune on this overnight, saying late Wednesday he did not expect Jefferson to be in uniform before declining to rule out playing time on Thursday.

While Jefferson is, obviously, woefully short of on practice time, the Kentucky game could represent the perfect opportunity for Miles to return him to the field. The game is likely to be well out of hand by its late stages; Jefferson's debut would be over and done with rather than becoming a potential distraction as the Tigers prepare for more rugged opponents; Kentucky's questionable run defense should allow him to enjoy some on-field success and confidence in the process of getting his 2011 feet wet.

So despite Miles calling the prospect "unlikely," it won't surprise us at all if Jefferson does take the field late in the game Saturday.

Can Jefferson reclaim his starting job from Jarrett Lee? Miles stated flatly that Lee is his starting quarterback, and barring a surprise defeat and/or a sudden, dramatic downturn in Lee's performance, that shouldn't change. As dynamic as the Tiger defense and special teams have been, the biggest difference between these 2011 Tigers and the past few editions -- which also featured dynamic defense and special teams -- has been the offense's ability to step on the opponent's proverbial throat when handed the opportunity.

Lee's efficient-bordering-on-outright-good play has been a major part of that, most notably in his 16-of-28, 3-TD, 0 INT performance on the road in Morgantown. Not even the Hatter would be Mad enough to mess with the kind of success LSU's enjoyed so far this season, so Jefferson won't be able to take the job away; Lee can only lose it.

So what kind of role can Jefferson expect? We'll let Miles do the talking here: "Just like a year ago when Lee played in every game, there would be that opportunity that Jordan Jefferson would play in every game as well."

Lee's role was as the change-of-pace quarterback Miles has always preferred to rotate in for a series here or there (remember Ryan Perriloux helping win the Tigers' 2007 national title? Miles does), and Jefferson's instantaneuous promotion to second-string over Zach Mettenberger suggests Miles isn't kidding when he talks about getting Jefferson playing time. But whereas Lee came in to add an aerial element in 2010, Jefferson will be expected to use his legs and elusiveness to give the running game a boost.

Given that Jefferson never seemed to reach his potential as an every-down quarterback, focusing on a limited package specifically tailored to his strengths could make him more effective than ever. As long as Lee continues his solid play, Lee with Jefferson as the off-the-bench curveball offers far more potential than Jefferson giving way to the more-conventional Lee.

No one would argue that the bar brawl and Jefferson's suspension have been good things for LSU ... but it's nonetheless possible they could wind up accidentally forcing Miles into best-case quarterback scenario he never quite found the past three seasons.
Posted on: September 28, 2011 1:16 pm
 

Why Les Miles could succeed as an NFL head coach

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



No, we haven't done any scientific surveys or hired Gallup to conduct a poll. But we have an edcuated guess as to how most college football fans would react to this CBSSports.com Mike Freeman report that several NFL teams are looking at Les Miles as a serious head coaching candidate. And that reaction is: WHAAAAA?

Even amongst college football fans -- heck, even amongst LSU fans -- Miles is rarely viewed as some kind of coaching savant. There's the late-game clock mismanagement. The years of underachieving offenses. The inability to gets his uber-talented teams over the hump to an undefeated season, national title or not. (Say it with us, Miles skeptics: "You can't spell Les Miles without two L's.")

But even if you aren't impressed by Miles' record -- and with a national title, two SEC West titles, and four seasons of 11 wins or more in only six tries, you should be -- the wildly successful start to his team's 2011 season should be evidence enough that he's doing something right. Several somethings, in fact, somethings that could very well make Miles a success even after making the leap to the NFL.

And if you've missed them along the way, these are them:

He coaches to win. Sounds simple, right? But truckloads of coaches base their in-game decisions on not losing rather than winning, and the end result is that their record in close games hews to the .500 mark you'd expect when allowing luck to be the deciding factor. Not Miles: whether it's throwing the famous last-second bomb to beat Auburn in 2007, calling the last-minute fake field goal that helped down Florida in 2010, or a dozen other examples, Miles is committed to calls that give his team a chance to win, not just a shot at avoiding a loss.

The proof is in the pudding of his record in close games: 22-9 in his six seasons in games decided by a touchdown or less. In a league by nature even more conservative than the college game, Miles's go-for-broke approach could pay even bigger dividends.

He surrounds himself with the right coaches. Not every move Miles has made on his staff has been gold; after defensive coordinator Bo Pelini left to become Nebraska's head coach following the 2007 national championship. Miles promoted Doug Mallory and Bradley Dale Peveto as co-coordinators to fill that spot ... and promptly watched the Tiger defense take a massive step backwards in a disappointing 8-5 2008 season.

But Miles didn't wait around to see if Mallory and Peveto could get it together. He promptly went out and hired respected ex-Tennessee coordinator John Chavis, and the LSU defense has never looked back. Even many of Miles's less popular hires have paid dividends--look no further than Steve Kragthorpe, the widely reviled former Louisville head coach brought on as offensive coordinator this offseason to general disdain. But it's Kragthorpe having the last laugh: former pick-six machine Jarrett Lee is playing the best quarterback of his life and the Tigers have been ruthless in the red zone.

Assuming Miles learned the pro game well enough from his two-year stint with the Dallas Cowboys to have an idea of who he'd want on his NFL staff, that same eye for coaching talent should serve him well.

His special teams are dynamite. For years, LSU has boasted some of the best-coached, most consistent and most explosive special teams units in the SEC. Much of that success has been chalked up to the Tigers' string of top-notch return men: Trindon Holliday, Chad Jones, Patrick Peterson. But after watching Morris Claiborne emphatically end West Virginia's second-half rally with a kickoff return for touchdown last Saturday (and Tyrann Mathieu do much the same to Oregon with his forced fumble and reutnr-for-touchdown on punt coverage), it's time to acknowledge that LSU's special teams success runs deeper than just the guys asked to field the ball.

He connects with his players. It's not worth belaboring the point already made by Freeman in his report, but no one has ever accused Miles's teams of not playing their hardest for him, nor Miles himself of being unable to reach recruits or manage his star players. Motivating and focusing college kids is a very different task than doing the same for seasoned professionals, but Miles's homespun charisma and willingness to trust his players to win games (see the first item on this list) should go a long way towards helping him make the adjustment.

Miles would no doubt have a lot to learn about the NFL -- two years as a tight end coach doesn't seem like an ideal level of pro experience for someone being asked to take over his own team -- but he appears to have a foundation in place that would serve him well should he make the leap. With NFL teams apparently willing to offer him the chance, the question is: will he?

Posted on: September 24, 2011 11:58 pm
Edited on: September 24, 2011 11:59 pm
 

QUICK HITS: No. 2 LSU 47, No. 16 West Virginia 21

Posted by Chip Patterson

LSU WON. West Virginia was able to get Dana Holgorsen's offense in rhythm, collecting 533 total yard of offense.  But on Saturday LSU provided a potent offense of their own, feeing off great field position and 4 turnovers to a 47-21 win in Morgantown.  There was trash talking, hard hits, and great competition at the skill positions.  But the game was won for LSU in the trenches on both sides of the ball, with the Tigers wearing down West Virginia and pulling away late. 

HOW LSU WON: The Tigers' touted defensive unit did not put up numbers that would jump off the page (like the aforementioned 533 yards of offense for West Virginia), but they delivered enough timely turnovers and frurstrating pass coverage that kept West Virginia from crossing the end zone.  Nearly every time the Mountaineers started rolling down the field, LSU would come up with a perfect stop just outside of scoring position.  Jarrett Lee also put together an unusually impressive evening, completing 16 of 28 passes with three touchdowns and no interceptions.  Once the Tigers' had the lead for good, it was Ware and Ford pounding the ball on West Virginia's 3-3-5 defense.  An exhausting clock drainer that has become LSU's bread and butter in the fourth quarter.

WHEN LSU WON: West Virginia got the home crowd rocking after scoring two unanswered touchdowns in the third quarter to cut the LSU lead to six points.  In typical Tigers fashion, they completely reveresed the game's momentum with a big special teams play.  Morris Claiborne took the ensuing kickoff 99 yards down the field for a touchdown and a two score lead for LSU.  It was a crippling blow to the home crowd and West Virginia's offense did not get a chance to score again.

WHAT LSU WON: The right to be considered the best team in the nation.  The Tigers have put together some of the most impressive on field performances this season, but their body of work and strength of schedule gives plenty of reasons for voters to consider placing LSU above Oklahoma and Alabama in the No. 1 spot.  There are still plenty of obstacles left in that rigourous schedule, but it is hard to make an argument FOR either Oklahoma or Alabama after LSU has beaten Oregon on a neutral field, as well as Mississippi State and West Virginia at home in primetime.

WHAT WEST VIRGINIA LOST: The chance to leap up into the Top 10 nationally and make a case as a national contender.  Playing in the Big East won't get you enough respect from the voters and computers to give you many opportunities past the BCS berth, but a 4-0 start with victories over Maryland and LSU would give plenty of reason to consider the Mountaineers a dark horse.  West Virginia is still the favorite to win the Big East, and now that needs to be their No. 1 focus. 

THAT WAS CRAZY: Tyrann Mathieu.  Other fans may get tired of the attention he's getting, but we will stop calling his name when he stops making plays.  From strips, to interceptions, to punt returns, to downing punts at the one-yard-line; the guy is all over the place.  He wears Patrick Peterson's number and he still has (at least) one more full season to continue to improve.  

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: September 23, 2011 4:36 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 4:42 pm
 

PODCAST: ACC, Big East, and other comedy

Posted by Chip Patterson

Adam Aizer and I watched several comedies on Thursday night. One was a football game, the others were on primetime television. We break down several aspects of Cincinnati's 44-14 route of N.C. State, on and off the field. We also preview some of the ACC's biggest matchups in Week 4, including North Carolina trying to slow down Georgia Tech, and a banged up Florida State team trying to bounce back against Clemson in Death Valley.

We also answer questions raised in one of the better listener emails this week, as it pertains to Saturday night's showcase of LSU and West Virginia under the lights in Morgantown.

If you would like to submit a question or feedback for next week's podcast, send it to cbsipodcastfeedback [at] cbs [dot] com

Listen below, download the MP3, or you can click here to open up the pop-out player and keep browsing. Don't forget to subscribe to the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast on iTunes



Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
 
 
 
 
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