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Tag:Larry Scott
Posted on: September 13, 2011 12:40 pm
Edited on: September 14, 2011 11:26 am
 

Report: Oklahoma wants out and Big 12 is 'done'

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We can't personally vouch for the credibility of the Austin-American Statesman's sources. But if the picture portrayed by those sources in this story by Kirk Bohls and Alan Trubow is at all accurate, the day of reckoning for the Big 12 is just about at hand.

According to the report -- and as also reported by CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd -- University of Texas president Bill Powers and athletic director DeLoss Dodds flew to Oklahoma Sunday for a meeting with Sooners officials. Powers' and Dodds' aim, according to Bolhs and Trubow: convince Oklahoma (and by association, joined-at-the-hip in-state rival Oklahoma State) to remain in the Big 12 and forgo applying for membership in the Pac-12.

But according to the report's sources, the Sooners' minds were -- and are -- already made up. They're looking West:
"There's nothing Texas could have offered Oklahoma that would have changed their mind. They were set on leaving the Big 12 before Texas got there," a well-placed source at a Big 12 school said, adding that Sunday's meeting had a very friendly and cooperative tone. "The Big 12's done. Oklahoma wasn't open to creating Big 12 stability" ...

"Texas must have come into the meeting and seen the handwriting on the wall," said a source close to OU and Texas who is familiar with these realignment issues. "I think OU and OSU will seek membership to the Pac-12 in the next two weeks, but [Texas] A&M comes first."
Despite the Sooners' and Cowboys' intentions, even the report isn't ready to move the realignment chess pieces just yet. While the Oklahoma and Oklahoma State move is "expected," Larry Scott -- who has said repeatedly the Pac-12 doesn't want to expand at this time -- and the Pac-12 presidents could reject the Sooners' and Cowboys' applications.

But assuming Scott does pull the trigger, Texas would be left without a viable conference as the Big 12 crumbles. Per the report, their options at that stage would be to follow the Oklahoma schools to the Pac-12 (or -14), apply to join the ACC, or go independent--and the report claims Texas officials have already had highly preliminary talks with the ACC.

While independence is described as the least appealing option for Dodds and Texas officials, the Longhorn Network could be a major stumbling block for joining one of the other conferences. According to Bohls and Trubow, "Texas has no desire to part, alter or share any aspect of The Longhorn Network, but it would not be able to retain the network as is in the Pac-12." The Longhorns are also reportedly balking at the Pac-12's plan for divisional alignments in a 16-team scenario.

So what's the bottom line right now? With the Statesman report backing the widespread rumors that the Sooners are ready to pack their bags, it seems safe to assume that Oklahoma is indeed bent on abandoning the Big 12 and concluding its viability as a conference. But past that? Every other conference realignment chip is still in the air, and it remains anybody's guess where they fall.

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Posted on: September 10, 2011 8:50 pm
Edited on: September 10, 2011 9:15 pm
 

Larry Scott not proactive in conference expansion

Posted by Bryan Fischer

LOS ANGELES -- While Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott's newest acquisition, Utah, was warming up on the field of his conference's most storied member, USC, the former tennis executive strolled into the Coliseum press box beaming about the first ever conference game that was to take place a few minutes later.

Then he met a swarm of media interested in just one topic.

"I'd prefer to be less popular," Scott joked after being inundated with questions about conference expansion. "On this topic, we're trying to stay out of the story frankly. Our position hasn't really changed, we haven't been looking for or aspiring to expand since we made the decision on 12.

"If schools are going to leave the Big 12 and there's going to be a paradigm shift, or a landscape change as people like to describe it, we'll go ahead and step back and look at our options, then reconsider."

Scott is just one of the key figures in the ongoing conference realignment saga that has infringed on the start of the college football season. In a nod to the fact that the story seems to change by the day, if not by the hour, Scott couldn't even confirm that he would be running a 12 team league next year.

"I know there will be a Pac-12," he said before cautioning, "I hope there is. The ink is still drying on our new logos and the field paint and uniforms. It's our hope that the world stays the same and we get to enjoy what we've created. I don't think anyone, with how dynamic the situation is, would stick their neck out and say nothing is going to change."

While most of the nation was focused on the thrilling Missouri-Arizona State game Friday night, Scott not only took in the action in Tempe but also discussed issues with the man who has seen several of his teams openly flirt with other conferences, Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe.

"I did speak with Dan yesterday," Scott said. "He was due to be in Tempe but didn't go. So we spoke over the phone and had a nice chat."

Scott already tried to raid Beebe's conference once before. Last summer he tried to boldly add Colorado, Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State to form a Pac-16 superconference. While he was unsuccessful in fulfilling his goal of adding all six teams - settling for the Buffalos and Utes - he still sees the future of major college athletics as having four, 16-team superconferences.

"I still believe it and I think what's going on is evidence that there's a disparity between certain conferences," he said. "I've been saying that over the past year that there will be more consolidation. I didn't think it would happen so quickly - a year after we expanded - that we'd have so much noise around the issue."

The commissioner did acknowledge that several schools have reached out to him - presumably Oklahoma and Oklahoma State - to gauge interest in the Pac-12 being a popular landing spot. Scott cautioned that there have been no votes nor any formal talks at adding teams to the conference. Given the threats of legal action from schools like Baylor, he chose his words carefully when asked about what could happen over the next few weeks.

"We're not being proactive, we're not trying to initiate any move to conferences beyond 12," said Scott. "I'm trying to be more precise in the language because it's a highly charged situation. People are hanging on every word, I felt that the media was getting a little further out in front of where we actually were, so I have had to be more precise that we're not initiating a move to superconfereces. We are only evaluating anything if other conferences go first."

For now, Scott and Pac-12 will wait. And watch. And listen.


Posted on: September 7, 2011 11:26 pm
Edited on: September 7, 2011 11:26 pm
 

VIDEO: Will there be a Pac-16 conference?

Posted by Bryan Fischer

How is Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott revolutionizing his conference and college football? Will he eventually transform the league by adding Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas and Texas Tech? CBS Sports' Tony Barnhart, Brian Jones and The Daily's John Walters discuss recent events and the future of college football.



Posted on: September 6, 2011 8:29 pm
Edited on: September 6, 2011 8:31 pm
 

Pac-12 Poll Reactions, Week 1

Posted by Bryan Fischer

It was a rough week for the Pac-12, certainly not what Larry Scott had hoped for in the first (and perhaps only) year of the new twelve team league. Oregon was embarrassed in the featured game of the week, UCLA had issues with Houston in the afternoon, USC didn't impress against Minnesota and, oh yeah, Oregon State lost to an FCS foe. This week could be a make or break week for some in the conference and also could give everybody some clarity in how the South division will sort out with Utah traveling to Los Angeles to play USC in the first ever conference game.

But at least we actually got to see everybody play someone other than themselves so it's a bit easier to figure out how they fall in the Top 25. A look at the conference of champions in the latest AP and Coaches polls:

AP/Coaches

6/6. Stanford

The Cardinal are the top team in the polls for the Pac-12 and it might be awhile before they face a stiff enough test to knock them from off their perch. They easily won their game against San Jose State, 57-3, and Andrew Luck did a good job of getting his new receivers the ball early. Running back Stepfan Taylor rushed for two touchdowns and most of the first team players on both sides of the ball played sparingly. Up next is a trip to Duke.

13/14. Oregon

Quite the drop for the Ducks after the loss to LSU in Dallas. No, they didn't play very well and yes, it's a little concerning that they couldn't get the ground game going against another big SEC team but the drop should be temporary for Oregon. This is still a good football team who has a chance to run their way to the Rose Bowl and, keep in mind, it was a three point game against the Tigers at halftime. Running back LaMichael James needs to get going after posting just 54 yards against a stout defense. Nevada is up next in the Ducks' home opener.

NR/23. Arizona State

The Sun Devils are a borderline top 25 team according to the pollsters but certainly impressed last week against an overmatched UC Davis, winning 48-14. Running back Cameron Marshall looked good for the offense, catching the ball out of the back field four times for 86 yards and rushing for two touchdowns. The defense was as advertised, as linebacker Vontaze Burfict racked up thee sacks and - shockingly - didn't commit a single penalty. The real test comes this week as they'll host Missouri in a big Friday night matchup in the desert.

Others receiving votes:

Arizona State (119 points in the AP poll), USC (69 in the AP), Utah (24 in the AP/42 in the coaches), Arizona (5 in the AP, 28 in the coaches), Washington (3 in the coaches), Cal (1 in the coaches).


Posted on: September 4, 2011 2:00 am
Edited on: September 4, 2011 2:00 am
 

What I learned from the Pac-12 (Week One)

Posted by Bryan Fischer

1. It was a rough week for the Pac-12.

The non-conference slate is usually something the Pac-12 takes pride in but Larry Scott would certainly like to forget week one of the season on the field and concentrate on expansion off of it. Record-wise, the conference did ok at 8-4. Look deeper however, and you'll see some serious flaws. Washington allowed their first ever FCS opponent to throw for 473 yards and three touchdowns on them before Desmond Trufant made a last minute interception. USC, too, held on thanks to a last minute pick and Oregon State lost to an average FCS team in Sacramento State. Rick Neuheisel's seat got warmer with a loss to Houston and, in the week's flagship game, Oregon got pushed around by an LSU team dealing multiple off the field issues. Yes other conferences struggled this weekend, and yes the Pac-12 can rebuild their reputation, but it was just not a great start to the 2011 season out West.

2. Stanford is the conference torch-bearer for now.

There's no question it will be extremely tough for Oregon to get back into the national title race given the back-to-back losses to SEC teams and the way they were manhandled in the opener. Is it impossible for them to end up in New Orleans? No, but it will be a long climb back to the top five to be in that position again. That leaves Stanford as the most likely Pac-12 representative that can make a run. They certainly have the quarterback as Andrew Luck spread the ball around to several new targets as the Cardinal rolled San Jose State 57-3. Their schedule looks even easier now too as they host Oregon and wrap up with an even more suspect Notre Dame team. They have the best player in the country and now it's their turn to lead the charge until the Ducks roll into Palo Alto for the head-to-head showdown to take it back from them.

3. Robert Woods is a special player.

After being limited throughout parts of spring practice and fall camp, it's clear that the Freshman All-American is a key cog in the USC offense. Woods caught a school-record 17 passes for 177 yards and three touchdowns and simply was the Trojans' offense against Minnesota. His quarterback was pretty sharp too, as Matt Barkley completed a school-record 34 passes despite an average-at-best offensive line in front of him. There were plenty of quick passes to Woods Saturday afternoon, but his burst and ability to break tackles are a good reason why he's wearing former great Steve Smith's number. The offense trailed off in the second half but if there's one bright spot for Lane Kiffin watching the film, it's that Woods is a star.

4. Where does Oregon State go from here?

Mike Riley didn't really know what kind of team he had this year and after week one, he really might not know. The Beavers played more freshmen in a game than they have in the last 16 years and even then, it's hard to figure out how they dropped their home opener to an FCS school that was 6-5 last season. It does appear that the team has found a replacement for Jacquizz Rodgers after true freshman Malcolm Agnew rushed for 223 yards and three touchdowns. Quarterback Ryan Katz was not sharp at all, completing 50 percent of his passes with an interception before being replaced at halftime. With so many question marks, Riley and company better figure some things out quickly as they'll travel to a very impressive Wisconsin team next week.

5. Why is Oregon throwing the ball so much?

Yes LSU's defense was good and yes, it was certainly swarming anytime an Oregon player touched the ball. That still doesn't explain why the Ducks couldn't run the ball Saturday night and Chip Kelly had Darron Thomas throw it an eye-popping 54 times. That was the most attempts by a quarterback on the team in over seven years. Seven. It's just not like Kelly's team to purposefully try to establish the run early and often either. Once they got behind you can understand them going to the air but rarely has the run-pass split been like it has been against LSU (and feel free to go back to last year against Auburn too). LaMichael James was held under 60 yards on the ground for his second straight game and it appeared he never could find daylight. Whether that's because he's a half-step slower or because the rebuilt offensive line couldn't create a hole is something the coaching staff will have to figure out. Bottom line, it has to be concerning to see Thomas drop back to throw as much as he did.


Posted on: September 3, 2011 5:54 pm
Edited on: September 3, 2011 5:55 pm
 

Report: Oklahoma focused on the Pac-12

Posted by Tom Fornelli

On Friday Oklahoma president David Boren was very open about the fact that Oklahoma was exploring all its options when it comes to its conference alignment. On Saturday afternoon Oklahoma State president Burns Hargis released a statement basically saying that Oklahoma State is going to do whatever Oklahoma decides to do.

Well, according to a report in The Oklahoman, that would be joining the Pac-12.
Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott was in Arlington, Texas, on Saturday night for the Oregon-LSU game.

Prime opportunity for OU officials to meet with the head of the conference they are considering joining. But an OU source said Saturday there were no plans for Scott to meet with the Sooners.

Not because something has gone wrong, but because something went right.

“I don't think anybody needs to go” meet with Scott, the source said, indicating the Pac-12 has become the Sooners' sole focus.
That makes it sound like Oklahoma isn't exactly worried about trying to keep the Big 12 together at this point, does it?

It's been reported that if the Pac-12 does expand again, it'd like to go to 16 teams with Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas and Texas Tech being those four schools. While the Texas schools haven't been very vocal about any plans on leaving the Big 12 for the Pac-12, that's obviously not the case with the Oklahoma schools.

In the same report a "highly-placed" Oklahoma State source said that the Pac-12 is "probably the way it's going to go. OU and OSU have to stick together."

Oklahoma opens its season against Tulsa in Norman on Saturday night.
Posted on: August 31, 2011 3:00 pm
Edited on: August 31, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Even post-A&M, 16-team conferences are no lock

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



Texas A&M
announced Wednesday it would apply to join "another conference," a conference that even the tubeworms living without sunlight at the bottom of the Pacific could tell you* is the SEC. The Aggies will certainly-as-certainly-gets make 13 for Mike Slive's league, and since a 13-team conference with one 6-team division and one 7-team division is the college football equivalent of a table with one leg an inch too short, expect the SEC to find a 14th team sooner rather than later.

The question begged by A&M's arrival is this: why now? During Expansionpalooza 2010, Slive and the SEC seemed more than happy to stand pat with the same 12 teams and two divisions that have made them the sport's proverbial 500-pound gorilla, the elephant no one has proven capable of shoving out of the room. But come 2011, when the Aggies called griping about the changes in their neighborhood, Slive was happy to ask them to move into his.

Ask many fans and pundits, and they'll tell you the A&M invite is Slive's preemptive strike against Larry Scott and the Pac-12 and Jim Delany and the Big Ten, the two commissioners and conferences that -- the argument goes -- are poised to usher in the era of 16-team "superconferences," wresting away control of the sport ... if Slive doesn't beat them to the punch.

But adding Texas A&M isn't about what Scott and Delany might have in the future. It's about what they have right now.

Namely, it's about the television networks that those conference have or will have, and that the SEC version that Slive shortsightedly passed on when he signed the league's current deals with CBS and (more to the point where the league network is concerned) ESPN. While the Big Ten Network's revenues skyrocket and the Pac-12's TV revenues are set outdo the SEC's even before the league's network starts airing, the SEC is scheduled to earn the exact same amount in TV money in 2023 they are today ... when the league's contract is already below market value.

Whether the SEC's expansion will give them enough re-negotiation leverage to either get an SEC network off the ground -- or just keep pace with the Pac-12 in base contract value -- remains a matter of conjecture. But if any expansion choice could do it, you'd think Texas A&M would. The Aggies expand the league's "footprint" into Texas, have close ties to the major-major Houston market, have a massive alumni base, and have traditionally been a highly competitive, nationally relevant football program.

But even the Aggies might make not that much of an impact on the SEC's bottom line. Former CBS Sports president Neal Pilson told CNBC this week that "there are smart people at both ESPN and CBS and I would anticipate that they foresaw this type of contingency ... if there's any adjustment to the TV deals, I would anticipate that it would be a very modest adjustment." Pilson wouldn't even guarantee that after A&M's addition, the SEC's per-school revenue distribution would match what it is now.

That may be selling the Aggies short. But it nonetheless speaks to why even after the A&M-SEC marriage, the age of the 16-team superconference is not yet upon us. Conference expansion isn't as simple as adding a team, sitting back, and watching the bottom line swell; that team has to add enough value to offset the significant division of league profits by 13 (and then, inevitably, 14) rather than 12. There's other substantial drawbacks, too: increased travel costs, fewer games for current members against their existing rivals**, stiffer competition for the league's limited number of national broadcasts (and, you know, championships).

Which is why "superconferences" likely remain firmly in the distant -- rather than the near -- future. If it takes adding Syracuse and Rutgers for the Big Ten to get up to 16 teams, why would they bother? If the new-look Pac-16 includes the likes of Fresno State or even Boise State -- still not exactly a major-market media powerhouse -- that's not exactly going to force Slive's hand. And assuming the SEC's "gentleman's agreement" not to expand into current SEC states is still intact, who would Slive pull for teams No. 15 and 16? The current whispers are that if Virginia Tech stands by its ACC man (as they say they will), the SEC could look at N.C. State--a member that would give the SEC the Raleigh TV market but (with all due respect) wouldn't have Scott and Delany crying into their respective beers.

The one scenario that could overturn the whole apple cart is Texas deciding to listen to Scott's overtures this go-round and dragging the likes of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State with them. But given the Longhorns' already-substantial investment in the Longhorn Network, here's a guess that neither they nor ESPN is going to like sharing their rare live content with the partially Fox-owned Pac-12 Network. And if the Longhorns either stay committed to the Big 12 or go independent, the Pac-12 could add some value by snapping up the Sooners and Cowboys ... but again, are there enough schools out there to justify going to 16?

When even adding A&M to go from 12 to 13 isn't a hands-down slam-dunk for the SEC -- and given that it's a backwards-looking desperation move motivated by the need to repair an earlier mistake, not a forward-looking "gotta do it" type of decision, how can it be? -- the guess here is that no, those schools are not.

14 may indeed be the new 12, but 16 remains what 14 was when the SEC first expanded in 1992--a number major college football will probably reach at some point in the future, but one that's not more than an intriguing hypothetical in the present.

*Trust me, I asked them. They added they were sick of hearing about expansion and scandal and just wanted the season to start.

**In the particular case of A&M and the SEC, this doesn't apply to LSU and Arkansas; the Tigers and Razorbacks have more history with A&M than they do many of their current SEC brethren.



Posted on: August 18, 2011 11:29 am
 

Larry Scott has some choice words for Paul Dee

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott has ruffled the feathers of those in college athletics before and it appears he has no problem doing so again in light of reports about significant NCAA violations at Miami.

Scott's most recent shot across the bow is aimed directly at Paul Dee, who was athletic director in Coral Gables when most of the violations occurred. Dee also was chairman of the NCAA Committee on Infractions and severely sanctioned USC for the school knowing or that they should have known about violations involving running back Reggie Bush.

Safe to say the commissioner agrees with many that Dee blasting the Trojans while his own department ran amok makes him a hypocrite.

"If the allegations prove true," Scott told The Los Angeles Times, "the words irony and hypocrisy don't seem to go far enough."

Scott added that the reports about what happened with the Hurricanes were "a real indictment of some of the problems that exist in college sports and college football and underscores the need for dramatic reform in rules, culture and the enforcement process."

Though he stopped short of fully advocating it, the commissioner also brought up the possibility that the NCAA could separate the enforcement process and allowing it to be done outside the organization.

"I think we need to step back and consider bold new ideas, including the possibility of bringing in outside resources," he said.
 
 
 
 
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