Tag:Sugar Bowl
Posted on: July 1, 2011 12:13 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 12:25 pm
 

No new bowl games for next three years

Posted by Tom Fornelli

If you were hoping that the NCAA would add another bowl game or two to the schedule in the near future, you're going to have to wait at least another three years for it to happen.

In April, NCAA president Mark Emmert called for a moratorium on bowl games during an investigation of the Fiesta Bowl and the way the game spent the money it made. The investigation eventually led to the bowl's CEO John Junker being dismissed from his role.

At the time, Emmert said the actions taken by Fiesta Bowl officials -- along with the questionable spending practices of the Orange and Sugar Bowls -- "call into question both the integrity and the quality of oversight of such events."

When Emmert and the NCAA announced the moratorium on bowl games, they gave the schools 60 days to "appeal" the NCAA's decision, and, as the USA Today points out, that 60-day window passed by earlier this week without a word of protest from any of the schools. 

Which means that there won't be any new bowl games added for at least the next three years. Which, in my opinion, is perfectly fine by me. The only way a new bowl game should be added to the schedule is if it's replacing an old one because 35 bowl games every season is more than enough. Having 35 games means that 70 of the 120 FBS schools are playing in a bowl game every season. Which also means that we get a lot of 6-6 teams being rewarded for having extremely mediocre seasons.

Don't get me wrong, I understand that bowl games are rewards for players, which I have no problem with. But when you start rewarding teams for losing just as many games as they won, it starts to feel like a tee-ball game in which nobody is keeping score and everybody gets a trophy. 

Posted on: June 9, 2011 3:23 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 9:41 am
 

CBSSports.com CFB 100, No. 2: The Fall of OSU



Posted by Adam Jacobi

It's fitting that Jim Tressel's nickname was The Senator. In Columbus and around the rest of the nation, that nickname was used as unironic praise, a testament to the Ohio State coach's maturity, open faith, and businesslike approach to running his football program. The name stuck because it fit. It also stuck because people conveniently forgot that Congress is and always has been one of the most reviled institutions in American history, one whose abysmal approval ratings are fueled by an institutional history of corruption, hypocrisy, and mistruths. Oh, Jim Tressel is a senator, all right. People just didn't really know it.

Back in 2010, Senator Tressel made the grave error of placing his players, his program, and himself above the law of the NCAA, and that's why we're here today (here's the full timeline). He found out that QB Terrelle Pryor and several teammates had been receiving impermissible benefits back in April, and hid the evidence from his athletic department. Astonishingly, there isn't a guarantee that the compliance department would have punished Pryor or would have withheld him from the 2010 season; after all, the department ordered memorabilia dealer (and purported Pryor payer) Dennis Talbott away from the program during the season, but Pryor was allowed to remain eligibile. 

So now, not only is Tressel out of a job and likely facing a mammoth punishment from the NCAA -- not an ideal situation for a newly unemployed, 58-year-old coach to find himself in, to say the least -- but Pryor is gone from the program now as well, right on the heels of a major NCAA investigation into his relationship with several prominent Columbus figures, and there's even been some speculation that AD Gene Smith's job is on the line too, along with president Gordon Gee

There's also a distinct possibility that the NCAA forces Ohio State to vacate some or all of the 2010 season's victories. Tressel knowingly used several players who, under NCAA statutes, were ineligible to play. And if the NCAA does indeed come down hard and takes away the 31-26 Sugar Bowl victory -- the bowl for which the "Buckeye Five" had controversially been allowed special eligibility -- oh, how the cackles of glee will ring forth from Fayetteville, Arkansas, and throughout the rest of the Southeast. The one thing OSU had been able to hang its hat on from the 2010 season that it never could before is that elusive bowl win over the SEC. It's one thing for Arkansas fans to claim that the Buckeyes only got that win by cheating, after all; it's another for the NCAA to agree with them.

More on Ohio State
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Still, it's worth reiterating that since the NCAA investigation is ongoing, it's impossible to know precisely how the story ends just yet. With Tressel and Pryor both gone from Columbus and thus no longer obligated to comply with the NCAA investigation -- though if Tressel ever wants to coach in the NCAA again, complying would be a wise idea -- the NCAA doesn't have as much to work with. That's not to say OSU's going to get off easy, though, since the NCAA probably has enough to justify significant penalties. How bad we're talking here remains to be seen.

As far as on the field goes, 2011 might be a little rough. Luke Fickell is the interim coach for now, and while there's probably a reason why Jim Tressel had named the 37-year-old his assistant head coach back in March, there's virtually no chance that Fickell has the gameday coaching chops, players' respect, or recruiting skill that Tressel had. No first-year head coaches do, for that matter. Fickell's going to have to make sure all hell doesn't break loose on that roster, keep as many recruits in the fold as possible, and also try to keep the team motivated for 2011 even if Ohio State receives some sort of postseason ban (an apt possible punishment, considering the strings pulled to keep Pryor and everyone else eligible for the game).

Meanwhile, under center, the loss of Terrelle Pryor could be disastrous. The long-running joke in Columbus was that the depth chart had been "Pryor and Prayer," and now Buckeye fans will have to prostrate themselves in front of the football gods in search of mercy. Left on the depth chart are four quarterbacks whose benefits scarcely outweigh their drawbacks at this point, and it's unlikely that any of them will be given a long leash in 2011 until a clear No. 1 QB emerges. Braxton Miller has the highest upside, but the kid is 18. Joe Bauserman was the backup last season, but he might not actually be any good -- and he's already 26. Neither Kenny Guiton nor Taylor Graham seems ready to start yet. Yes, this motley crew was going to have to take care of the offense for the first five games no matter what after Pryor was initially suspended by the team, but now there's no cavalry coming -- and Big Ten defensive coordinators know it.

More CFB 100
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The biggest consequence of Ohio State's fall from glory, though, might have nothing to do with Ohio State itself. Now, every compliance department is under increased scrutiny, whether from outside media sources or from within the program. There's no shortage of secretly terrified athletic directors who look at what's happening in Columbus and now have to double-check that their own athletic departments are actually on the up-and-up or if there's the possibility of serious malfeasanceColt McCoy's wife gave the city of Austin a collective minor heart attack when she went on the radio and described the uphill battle Texas' compliance office faces, but she stopped short of actually saying any violations had ever occurred. Is that because none had occurred, or she just knew better than to publicly admit anything? That's the type of million-dollar question every major football program faces now, thanks to Tressel and Ohio State.

And yet, regardless of what happens from here on out, the fall of Ohio State is still going to be an endless topic of debate in the 2011 season -- just as it has been already. Everyone's got an opinion on Tressel, and everyone's going to have an opinion on what the NCAA ends up doing to the Buckeyes. Once football season rolls around, all it'll take is one "how about this Ohio State situation" from a play-by-play announcer, and all of a sudden the guys in the booth have something to talk about for the rest of the fourth quarter of some inconsequential September blowout. Most of the opinions aren't exactly going to be positive, though Tressel will probably remain something of a sympathetic figure among the talking heads. He is not a crook, they will say, and they will be correct. Tressel is not a crook. He is a senator, and one whose senatorial hubris brought down his entire football program. Other powerhouses should take heed.

Posted on: June 5, 2011 7:30 pm
 

Delany "disappointed" about Ohio State situation

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Speaking to reporters about the Big Ten title game Sunday afternoon, commissioner Jim Delany said he was not angry at Jim Tressel or how Ohio State was handling their NCAA case invovling several players taking extra benefits. In a line surely to get him a call from PETA, Delany deflected talk that he was upset and feels that the school will eventually move past the bad prediciment they find themselves in.

"I kind of reserve anger for my dog, I try not to get terribly angry. I was disappointed, I wish it hadn't happened," he recalled upon receiving the news. "It wouldn't be accurate for me to say I was angry. I knew it was serious but I don't remember going into a rage.

"I would say that whenever you have a program, or programs, that operate at the level of exposure and public notoriety as ours do, when things don't go well it's not going to be a fun time. It's been hard on the coach, it's been hard on the players, it's been hard on the fans. I will tell you that at the same time, the test is how resilient are you? How do you manage this kind of challenge?

"It's not easy for Ohio State, it's not easy for the Big Ten but I have tremendous confidence in that program to be resilient and to do the right thing and to reestablish themselves."

An attorney and a former NCAA enforcement agent, Delany has handled his fair share of infractions cases at multiple stops in his career. As the situation in Columbus seemingly takes a new twist every week though, he did say there were plenty of lessons to be learned for all of the conference's schools.

"I think that the number one lesson is, from my perspective, is that when you're in a position of responsibility - as an athletic director, a president, a head football coach - and you come across a certain kind of information, the responsibility and duty arrises to do something with that information," Delany said. "Going back 20 years, we've been working with our institutions about processes and procedures with how you handle information in that situation."

Delany has been criticized for his role in lobbying the NCAA for the so-called 'Buckeye Five' to be eligible for Ohio State's appearance in the Sugar Bowl last season. While he vaguly addressed the criticism, he did note that his actions were based on what he knew at the time.

"At the time that I was involved with the eligibility issues, I took the facts as they were presented to me," Delany said. "I analyzed it and for me, a lot of that has been written about that, but for me there wasn't a coach involvement, there wasn't a booster involvement, there wasn't an agent involvement, there kids that made some bad judgements. So on that basis, we forwarded the information to the NCAA and they made the decision that they made about the Sugar Bowl."

The involvement of Tressel, the now former Buckeyes head coach, did seem to take Delany back given all that has been revealed. He said that the facts of the case have generally been agreed to by all parties and realizes that sometimes even people you know best will withold information.

"I was surprised to find out in January that Coach Tressel had previous knowledge about that. I guess I'm enough of a realist to know that can happen," Delany said. "I knew it was a very serious matter because I know, we've said for a long, long time, making it very clear to our coaches and our athletic directors and our faculty, that when that kind of information becomes available you have no choice. Your only choice is to forward it through the system. I recognized at the time that the failure to forward it through the system was a fundamental error and I wasn't exactly sure how the NCAA or the institution would handle it. I was disappointed, I was surprised, but I've been around long enough to know that those things happen."

Posted on: June 1, 2011 5:44 pm
 

Coaches (and LeBron) respond to Tressel decision

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Since seemingly the entire college football world is talking about Jim Tressel's decision to step down at Ohio State amid the program's growing improper benefits scandal, it's no surprise that his contemporaries across the FBS are, too.

Perhaps most solidly in Tressel's corner is Texas's Mack Brown, who had this to say:
“He’s done a lot of great things in college football,” Brown told the [Austin] American-Statesman, “and I know he’ll be a hall-of-famer at some point.”

“Jim Tressel’s a good friend,” Brown added. “I hate it for him, and that he and Ellen (Tressel’s wife) are going through this.”
Tressel's rival at Michigan, Brady Hoke, was similarly supportive ... if not so supportive as to abandon his habit of not actually naming the school from which Tressel resigned:
“I have great respect for Jim Tressel and what he has accomplished during his coaching career. We enjoy competing in ‘The Game’ and have great respect for our rivals in Ohio. Our program looks forward to the last weekend of November.”
At the SEC spring meetings, Bobby Petrino wasn't quite as sympathetic, saying he "felt" for Tressel but also questioning why the "Buckeye Five" had been eligible for his Razorbacks' Sugar Bowl defeat to OSU. (A discussion of his demands that his players tell the truth also seemed to be a rebuke of Tressel's cover-up attempts.) Nick Saban, though, used a military metaphorto express his reaction (emphasis added):
"I guess if you were in the military, we would say we lost a fine comrade in this whole thing," Saban said Tuesday at the Southeastern Conference spring meetings. "He's a good friend. He's been somebody that I've had a tremendous amount of respect for for a very, very good number of years. We kind of grew up together in coaching. I'm from the Big Ten - Ohio and Michigan are places I've spent time in coaching, and we crossed paths quite a bit. I always had a tremendous amount of respect for Jim Tressel as a person and professionally - the way he sort of handled his business with a lot of class and character."
While we're talking about Ohio, though, we may as well mention the reaction of one of the state's most famous sons ... and most hated villains. Via our sister Eye on Basketball blog, LeBron James:
"He's done some great things for that university. It's unfortunate all the allegations and things that have come out in the past year," James said."Everyone in Columbus and Ohio knows how important, how great he was for the team and university ... "I wish him the best, and the organization. Hopefully the university will come back. It's one of the best universities we have in America."
That's a very nice thing for LeBron to say. The guess here is that he's still not allowed inside the state's borders.
Posted on: May 2, 2011 12:11 pm
 

Report: Buckeyes' Bell suspended for season

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The longest offseason in recent Ohio State memory just got a tiniest bit longer.

According to 247Sports affiliate Bucknuts, redshirt sophomore linebacker Dorian Bell has been suspended for the duration of the 2011 season "for a third violation of the same team rule." Bell had already missed last year's Sugar Bowl victory through suspension and would have missed the season opener against Akron, but will now join head coach Jim Tressel and the "Buckeye Five" on the sidelines for the both the first five games of 2011 and longer.

Bell's suspension won't be quite as damaging as those to Tressel or Terrelle Pryor -- he has nine career total tackles -- but it's not exactly like losing the second-string waterboy, either. Bell had enjoyed a strong spring, putting himself into the mix to potentially start at one outside linebacker position and all-but sealing himself a spot in the regular playing rotation. A former five-star recruit out of Monroeville (Pa.), Bell seemed like a strong candidate to have a breakout season.

That breakout would have been a huge help to his team, too, who saw multi-year linebacker starters Brian Rolle and Ross Homan both drafted Saturday; the unit could use both the depth and star potential Bell represented.

But unless Bell is reinstated, it looks like that Depth and potential will have to wait until 2012 at the earliest.



Posted on: March 30, 2011 7:58 pm
Edited on: March 30, 2011 8:03 pm
 

PAC: Other BCS bowls guilty of irregular spending

Posted by Adam Jacobi

On the heels of the nightmare investigative report released by the Fiesta Bowl yesterday, there's been a great deal of consideration as to whether the Fiesta Bowl should retain its BCS status, or whether the controversy surrounding the bowl is too much for the BCS to deal with.

The BCS has established a task force on the issue and has tasked the Fiesta Bowl with proving that it deserves its BCS status, which certainly seems appropriate, but now the question is whether the rest of the BCS bowls are clean, or if the abuses are more systemic. Thus, the BCS finds itself in the difficult position of deciding whether or not to subject the other BCS bowls to heightened, public scrutiny. If the other bowls can survive an investigation, it makes the BCS look better, but if they can't we may have a house of cards situation, and one of the BCS's main priorities has always been self-preservation.

Unfortunately for the BCS, the Playoff PAC has no such compunction about whether to publicly scrutinize the BCS bowls, and recently released this statement about curious spending practices at those institutions. There's no allegations of campaign finance abuse, but if that's the best thing you can say about the bowls' case, they're not in a good spot. The release is printed in its entirety below.

The BCS's Fiesta Bowl fired its long-time CEO yesterday after an internal investigation revealed that the BCS Bowl used its charitable funds to unlawfully reimburse employees' political contributions and pay for top executives' weddings, four-day junkets to Pebble Beach, and four personal country club memberships.  The Bowl's internal inquiry was initiated to "investigate the myriad allegations raised by Playoff PAC" in the PAC's legal complaints filed with the Arizona Secretary of State and the Internal Revenue Service.

Playoff PAC co-founder Matthew Sanderson said: "In the interest of self-preservation, the BCS is now painting this Fiesta Bowl scandal as isolated misconduct. This is wrong. Public records show the BCS's Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl are also legally and ethically troubled. Any BCS effort to expel the Fiesta Bowl would be a hypocritical act, given the documented irregularities at these other BCS Bowls. And who's to say we won't find the same type of shockingly questionable behavior when the curtain is peeled back at the BCS's Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl?"

THE BCS'S ORANGE BOWL AND SUGAR BOWL IRREGULARITIES

Playoff PAC found the following with respect to the BCS's Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl, which have both organized themselves as public charities to obtain federal tax benefits:

  • The Orange Bowl sponsors an annual Caribbean Cruise that the Bowl itself describes as a "complimentary getaway" for Bowl staff and college football officials that features no business meetings.
  • One out of every $10 that the Sugar Bowl takes in ends up in the hands of its top 3 executives.
  • Sugar Bowl Exec. Dir. Paul Hoolahan received $645,386 in FY 2009, a year in which the Sugar Bowl lost money despite receiving a $1.4 million government grant. Mr. Hoolahan collected $25,000 more than the Rose Bowl's top three executives combined.
  • BCS Bowls use charitable funds to fly Bowl execs and spouses first-class, pay private club dues, and foot the bill for employees' personal income taxes. The Orange Bowl, for example, spent 756,546 on travel in FY 2009 for its personnel.
  • The Orange Bowl spent $331,938 on "parties" and "summer splash" in FY 2004, $42,281 on "golf" in FY 2004 and FY 2006, $535,764 on "gifts" in FY 2006, and $472,627 on "gifts" in FY 2008.
  • The Sugar Bowl benefited its insiders by paying six-figure sums for Bowl meetings and an average of $432,723 for "Football Committee" expenses the past three years.
  • The Sugar Bowl spent $201,226 on "gifts and bonuses" and $330,244 on "decorations" in FY 2008.   

Aside from these expenses, both BCS Bowls repeatedly describe expenses with vague verbiage. Given the Fiesta Bowl's revelations yesterday about questionable expenses that were once tagged with similarly indistinct labels, both BCS Bowls should fully account for these items.

  • The Sugar Bowl spent $710,406 in FYE 2007 and FYE 2008 on a mysteriously vague category called "special appropriations."
  • The Orange Bowl spends over $100,000 per year on "postage and shipping" (ten times the amount that other BCS Bowls spend annually).
  • The Orange Bowl spent $1,189,005 on unspecified "entertainment" and "catering" in FY 2009, $1,017,322 on undifferentiated "event food" and "entertainment" in FY 2008, and $75,896 on "recruitment" in FY 2008. 

QUESTION OF THE WEEK: WHICH BCS "TASK FORCE" MEMBERS ATTENDED FREE BOWL JUNKETS?

After the Fiesta Bowl scandal, the BCS trumpted a new task force to investigate the Bowl's findings. Records obtained by Playoff PAC show that at least one task force member (So. Mississippi's Richard Rianni) received a "complimentary getaway" in the Caribbean from the BCS's Orange Bowl last year--the same type of trip that will be the subject of any Fiesta Bowl investigation.

  • Will Mr. Rianni recuse himself from the BCS task force's deliberations?
  • Which other BCS task force members have accepted free trips from BCS Bowls, such as the Fiesta Bowl's annual "Fiesta Frolic"?

QUOTES OF THE WEEK: "FULLY COMPLIANT"

  •  "I'm disappointed because I just think it's a waste of state resources and our time as well." -- Fiesta Bowl Chairman Duane Woods, commenting in July 2010 on news that the state Attorney General would investigate the Bowl based on Playoff PAC's legal complaint. 
  • "The Fiesta Bowl is confident that it has always fully complied with tax laws and rules in its operations and activities." -- Fiesta Bowl statement in September 2010, reacting to Playoff PAC's filing of a tax-law complaint with the IRS.
Posted on: March 15, 2011 11:52 am
 

Spring Practice Primer: Arkansas

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice. So we here at the Eye on College Football will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at Nebraska , who opened spring camp on Saturday.

Spring Practice Question: There's no Ryan Mallett. So what is there, exactly?

We'll go ahead and spoil what we expect to be answer this spring: a whole heck of a lot.

But first, let's look at what the Razorbacks are missing without college football's most famous modified razor scooter -user. First and foremost, they'll be missing -- as Mallett himself said when asked how he'd respond to questions about his college career -- "seven thousand-plus yards and 60 touchdowns in two seasons." Those kind of numbers, and the attendant fear they (and Mallett's gatling-gun arm) put into the shell-shocked defenses he faced aren't easily replaced ... if they're replaced at all.

But it's possible that if the numbers and the arm strength aren't coming back, in ascendant junior Tyler Wilson the Hogs will welcome a few new things that even Mallett couldn't offer them. For all his intimidating talent, it's telling that Mallett summed up his resume for the pros with statistics rather than wins-and-losses or championships; while his two years were immensely successful both personally and from a team standpoint (the program's first-ever BCS bowl berth is nothing to sneeze at, to say the least), Mallett never did shake the nagging feeling from many observers he could have been even better than he was. In 2009, he pulverized the Eastern Michigans on the Hog schedule but too often tried to make the spectacular throw rather than the sensible one, resulting in a 39 percent combined completion rate in Arkansas's four games against ranked opponents (all losses). Mallett was much more consistent in 2010, but Hog fans still have to wonder: what if he hadn't had that three-interception meltdown at home against Alabama? What if the final throw of his college career hadn't been another game-ending boneheaded pick in the Sugar Bowl?

So what could Wilson offer that Mallett didn't? A little more poise down the stretch of big games, and maybe even a little more within-the-offense conservatism when necessary against deep coverage. It's worth remembering three other things in Wilson's favor here, too:

1. Bobby Petrino no doubt helped make Mallett the star he was, but he doesn't need an tree-sized, cannon-armed quarterback to be successful, as he proved with players like Stefan LeFors and Brian Brohm at Louisville;

2. Wilson looked outstanding in his one relief performance of Mallett last season, hitting 25-of-34 against Auburn for 332 yards and four touchdowns, nearly leading the Hogs out of a sizable deficit for what would have been a season-defining victory;

3. He won't have to carry the offense himself, and in fact won't have to carry much of it at all.

Per point No. 3, why not? Because in emerging workhorse running back Knile Davis (who topped 1,000 yards in the last nine games alone) and the senior wide receiving trio of Joe Adams, Jarius Wright and Greg Childs, no quarterback in the SEC (and maybe the country) should receive more support from his fellow skill position players that Wilson. He doesn't have to be Mallett to replace him.

And while most of the attention from Razorback fans this spring will likely center on whether the offense keeps humming, the Arkansas defense could be preparing for its best season yet under Petrino. Linebackers Jerry Franklin and Jerico Nelson both return for their senior seasons after finishing 1-2 on the team in tackles and 1-3 in tackles-for-loss a year ago; end Jake Bequette dominated in flashes last year, totaled a team-leading seven sacks, and could be poised for an All-SEC season; and the safety-corner combo of Tramain Thomas and Darius Winston look ready to pick up where last year's tag-team of Ramon Broadway and Rudell Crim left off.

So: the defense should be better. The running game and the receivers are in place. Which will turn all eyes towards Wilson this spring to see if he can deliver on the promise he showed against Auburn. If he can, even the loss of a wunderkind like Mallett might not be the kind of blow his reputation the past two seasons suggested it would be.

Posted on: March 7, 2011 7:48 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2011 8:05 pm
 

Report: Tressel knew of violations in April

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Remember last December when there was all the hullabaloo about five Ohio State Buckeyes selling memorabilia to Edward Rife, the owner of a tattoo parlor in Columbus? Remember how everyone was all up in arms about those five Buckeyes all being allowed to play against Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl, and not having to begin serving their suspensions until next season?

Man, those were some crazy times. Thank goodness we don't have to deal with any of that mess anymore. Oh, wait. Yes, it appears we do. According to a Yahoo! sports report, Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel knew what his players were up to in April of last year. A good eight months before Ohio State told the NCAA it knew of the situation.
Ohio State coach Jim Tressel was informed that several Buckeyes players were selling memorabilia more than eight months before the school claims it was made aware of the scheme, a two-month Yahoo! Sports investigation has found.
Tressel received information that players were selling items to Edward Rife – the owner of Fine Line Ink Tattoos in Columbus – as early as April 2010, according to a source. However, neither Ohio State nor the NCAA investigated the transactions or the players’ relationship with Rife until December 2010, when the school claims it was informed of the situation by the local United States Attorney’s office.
Ohio State director of compliance Doug Archie declined immediate comment when reached Monday by Yahoo! Sports. Tressel and athletic director Gene Smith were unavailable for comment. The NCAA declined comment.
If this is true, then both Tressel and Ohio State could be in a lot more trouble. Tressel could be charged with all sorts of violations, including unethical conduct and failure to monitor and promote an atmosphere of compliance. Just imagine the fun Michigan fans would have with that following the beating they took with the whole Rich Rodriguez investigation.

In fact, things could be so bad for Tressel if this is true, that failing to report what he knew right away could result in his termination. As is detailed in section 5.1 of his contract which says that failure to report "any violations" could lead to "termination by Ohio State for cause." There's no way to know if things will go that far.

Still, if this report turns out to be true, and the NCAA comes down hard on Ohio State -- though with the decisions the NCAA has made lately, who knows where they'll come down on this -- it's not entirely out of the question. It's going to be an interesting spring for Tressel and the Buckeyes, that's for sure.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com