Tag:Florida
Posted on: December 27, 2011 4:29 pm
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Report: Arkansas, A&M to end neutral-site series

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Despite expectations to the contrary, as of Tuesday afternoon the SEC still has yet to release its official 14-team schedule for 2012. But one key detail potentially outside the jurisdiction of the league office is all but official: Arkansas and Texas A&M will no longer play their annual series as a neutral-site game in Dallas.

For the past three seasons, the Razorback and Aggies have met at Cowboys Stadium as part of each team's nonconference schedule. But with A&M becoming one of Arkansas's divisional rivals in the new SEC West, the Aggies' willingness to continue the series at a neutral venue -- even one as glamorous as Jerry Jones' football space palace -- has waned. The Houston Chronicle's Brent Zwenerman reported Tuesday that one A&M official had told him the school "never" wants to play the game in Dallas again. 

Though not yet 100 percent finalized, according to Zwenerman all "indications" are that the neutral game is finished and that the series will continue as a usual conference home-and-home. Since the SEC forbids schools from hosting recruits at neutral-site conference games (like the World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party between Georgia and Florida), the A&M official quoted in the report said the current game's appeal as a recruiting tool would "lose its edge" as an intra-conference matchup.

Arkansas head coach Bobby Petrino had previously stated that while he and the Hogs would be happy to continue playing in Cowboys Stadium (no doubt for the continued novelty of rewarding Texas recruits with a game in their home state, an advantage A&M already has), the Aggies "really don't want to play" the neutral-site game in the future. 

The Aggies and Razorbacks had agreed to a 10-year nonconference series before A&M's decision to join the SEC last September.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview

Posted on: December 27, 2011 2:55 pm
 

PODCAST: Jan. 2 Bowl Previews

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We're now less than a week away from arguably the single biggest date on the 2011 college football calendar (even if it comes in 2012). That day is Jan. 2, home to four intriguing non-BCS bowls in addition to the Rose and Fiesta Bowls.

In this edition of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast, our Adam Aizer and Chip Patterson run down those four "other" bowls: Can Michigan State get over the SEC hump vs. Georgia in the Outback? Can Penn State shut down Case Keenum and Houston in the TicketCity? Is there any way the two lo-fi offenses on display in the Ohio State-Florida Gator Bowl can overshadow the Urban Meyer storyline? And what might South Carolina have learned in Nebraska's losses that could prove decisive in the Capital One Bowl?

To listen, click below, download the mp3, or pop out the player in a new browser window by clicking here. And remember that all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.

Posted on: December 23, 2011 5:37 pm
 

Report: 2012 SEC schedule "expected" Monday

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The long wait to see exactly how the SEC has corralled its new 14-team monster of a league into its 2012 football schedule -- and on short notice, no less -- should be almost over.

According to a report Friday from Pat Dooley of the Gainesville Sun, the finished 2012 SEC schedule "is expected to be released Monday." The SEC's official Twitter feed confirmed Thursday that the schedule is in its "final stages" but would not be made public until after Christmas.

But to believe the sources who have spoken to Dooley, the process has already gone past those "final stages" to "completed." Among the impacts of the last-minute addition of Missouri to the SEC East, Dooley reports, is that Florida won't receive the returned home game from their cross-divisional rotation trip to Auburn this past season--nor will they get their new, expected rotated-in matchup against Ole Miss. Instead, the Gators will face only two West opponents (Texas A&M and annual cross-division rival LSU) while adding Missouri to their East slate.

Assuming that information is correct, it will put to bed once and for all the notion -- advanced in November by no less than South Carolina president Harris Pastides -- that the SEC is moving to a nine-game conference schedule for 2012. The SEC moved quickly to quash that suggestion at the time, and Mike Slive told the Birmingham News Thursday that he "[doesn't] sense any interest" in moving beyond the current eight-game arrangement.

But neither that statement nor the eight-game 2012 slate rules out a nine-game schedule in the league's future. Slive also confirmed that the 2012 schedule is intended as a one-year stopgap before the 2013 slate establishes the SEC's future divisional rotations, and pointedly added "Who knows what the future holds?" when asked about the possibility of nine games.

So some of the nagging questions about the new look SEC will (very likely) be answered on Monday. Some, though, are going to linger on for a good deal longer than that.
Posted on: December 21, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: December 21, 2011 7:10 pm
 

Roundtable: Changes to the bowl schedule

Posted by Eye On College Football 


Occasionally the Eye on CFB team gathers, Voltron-style, to answer a pressing question from the world of college football. Today's question is:

What changes, if any, would you make to the current bowl schedule and/or bowl eligibility requirements?


Bryan Fischer: Any time you have a team like UCLA playing in a game at 6-7, I think it underscores that there needs to be a new rule that you not only be 6-6, but 7-5 at the very minimum. I get that the bowl games are a treat for the players but shouldn't we be rewarding winners and not the mediocre? The entire bowl system seems to have turned into the college football equivalent of a participation trophy. This, of course, ties-in with the line of reasoning that there are too many bowl games. At some point we'll get to the point where there's a good number of games for good teams but right now the excess causes mediocrity. For every crazy New Orleans Bowl finish we get, there's just as many Beef O'Brady Bowl duds it seems.

Tom Fornelli: I tend to agree with Bryan in that I'm not a big fan of 6-6 teams being rewarded for mediocrity, and I usually fall in line with the "there are too many bowl games" crowd, but then a funny thing happens every year. The games start, and they feature a couple of 6-6 teams, and I love them.

Yeah, there are some duds, but there are plenty of duds every Saturday during the regular season. So I think my personal criticisms from the current bowl system come from the fact that I'd like to see some type of playoff. A plus-one being the minimum of what I'd like to see.  So while I get extremely annoyed when I see that 6-6 Florida is playing 6-6 Ohio State in the Gator Bowl, I'm sorry, the TAXSLAYER.COM (bangs head, SIGN OF THE BEAST!!!) Gator Bowl, I'll probably still watch the game. I'm just a college football junkie, there's no way around it.

Jerry Hinnen: There's an easier fix for getting the UCLA-like riffraff out of the postseason than scuttling existing bowls: re-institute the discarded NCAA mandate that bowls must take teams with winning records ahead of teams with .500 (or sub-.500, in the Bruins' case) marks. "Too many bowls" is going to be a hard sell for the folks at places like Temple -- who unfairly sat at home after going 8-4 in Al Golden's final season last year -- or Western Kentucky, who should have gotten their first-ever FBS bowl bid after 2011's second-place Sun Belt finish and 7-5 record.

Cases like Temple's and WKU's are why, personally speaking, I'm fine-n'-dandy with the Participation Trophy Bowl circuit; not every game is going to be riveting theater (and matchups like UCLA-Illinois or Louisville-N.C. State promise to be quite the opposite), but it's not like anyone's required to watch. Should the seniors on that UL-Lafayette team we saw celebrating like they'd collectively won the Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes Saturday night have been denied that once-in-not-even-most-people's-lifetimes experience just because a few college football diehards don't want to risk being bored?

Is the long-since-antiquated notion that bowl berths are for no one but mid-major champions and the top handful of major-conference programs worth brilliant Hilltoppers' running back Bobby Rainey ending his career without a bowl appearance? Not if you ask me--if the players want to play them, the the local organizers want to host them, it's not my place (or any fan's) to say they shouldn't. The number of bowls is fine; the way the teams are selected could just use a little pro-winning-record tweaking. Besides, give it another month and there won't be any college football at all. I'll take whatever I can get at this stage, Belk Bowl included.

(That said, it would be outstanding if the NCAA also prohibited the exorbitant ticket guarantees that have turned bowl trips into a financial sinkhole for so many smaller schools, but that's a separate issue from the scheduling/eligibility question.)

Chip Patterson: I too would like to see limping 6-6 BCS conference team taken out of the bowl equation, particularly when there are dangerous Non-BCS teams that have been left out of postseason play in recent years. One way could be to change the requirements to 7-5, but this season I thought of another wrinkle.

Instead of changing the bowl eligibility record/win total, add a stipulation that requires a team to finish .500 or better in league play. Many times, the 6-6 team that fails to show up for a bowl game has struggled down the stretch and enters the postseason with little-to-no momentum. If schools are going to benefit from conference tie-ins, make them perform in conference play to earn that right. A 6-6 team with a 3-5 conference record likely is not playing their best football at the end of the season, and might be a part of one of the dud bowl games we have seen recently.

I would also prefer to move the "gutter" bowl games back before the BCS and traditional New Years Day games. That stretch of bowls leading up to the National Championship Game is one of the places where we find unattractive matchups and lose college football excitement after the blitz of New Years Day. If those games were moved back before the New Year and the title game was pushed back to Jan 4-5, it would arguably be a better spot for college football to capitalize on the nation's interest. Not only does the average fan have to wait, but they have to be teased with games that would be better consumed in pieces during a Dec. 28 doubleheader.

Adam Jacobi: It's important to keep in mind that most of these lowest-tier bowls are media-owned entities, which were created and staged every year because from a media perspective, live televised FBS college football is more lucrative than anything else that could be aired in the middle of a December week. As such, if you want to get rid of these bowls, you had better come up with something that produces higher ratings for that network instead, otherwise, no amount of hand-wringing about the quality of the teams playing in bowls is going to result in any meaningful change. This is not a scandal or anything that should not be, mind you, because it does not negatively affect fairness of play or anything else of vital importance. It's merely the entity that stands to gain most from lowest-tier bowls being played, making sure that the lowest-tier bowls get played by owning and organizing them. That's just good business.

Moreover, if by some chance these lowest-tier bowls happen to disappear, as much as we're tired of seeing a 6-6 (3-5) BCS-conference team get into the postseason, let's not pretend that that team's going to be the first against the wall. It's going to be the also-rans of the MAC, WAC, C-USA, and every other non-AQ conference, because 90% of the time, those non-AQ schools draw lower ratings than their BCS-level counterparts. The Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl between UCLA and Illinois is going to suck, but if we're being honest about what bowl organizers really want out of a team that they invite, UCLA and Illinois are going to keep getting bowl invitations over even 8-win teams like Tulsa, Toledo, or Louisiana Tech.

So if you're asking me what I would change about the bowl system, I wouldn't possibly know where or how to begin. The bowl system is a product of media desires and inequality in FBS football, so if you want the bowl system to be any different, you'd better figure out a way to fix either the media landscape or the college football landscape first, and well... good luck with that.

Tom Fornelli: What if we replace the mid-week December games with gladiator like competitions? In which players from each school battle each other to the death. The loser, obviously, dies and frees up a scholarship for the school. The winner gets extra credit in any class of his choosing!

WHO WOULDN'T WATCH?

Adam Jacobi: Well, that would certainly be heartbreaking for everyone involved.

I wouldn't mind it if the sponsors (or bowl organizers or the stadium) had a little bit of leeway in ground rules for these games. These are silly games anyway (unless I'm supposed to take something called the Beef O'Brady's Bowl completely seriously all of a sudden), so why shouldn't the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl be played with literally a giant potato for a football? Field goals in the Holiday Bowl worth 4 points if they're from more than 45 yards out? Fine by me! Special uniforms in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl designed to look like boxes of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese? OF COURSE we should be doing that.

So yeah, as long as we're going to have ultimately trivial exhibitions end the seasons of so many teams, we might as well make said trivial exhibitions unique in ways that go beyond mere branding.

Tom Fornelli: These ideas have my full support.  Can you imagine how much better the Orange Bowl would be if they were using an orange instead of a football?

Chip Patterson: Did they change tires on car at half time of the Meineke Car Care Bowl? If not they should.  Same goes for the Belk Bowl. I think instead of a coin toss there should be a Dockers shopping spree to determine who gets the ball first.

Adam Jacobi: And if Hooters got involved, there would be... lots of wings available for attending fans to eat. And that is all.

To chime in on the bowl schedule debate, or offer your own changes; "Like" us on Facebook and let us know what you think.

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Posted on: December 16, 2011 12:22 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2011 12:51 pm
 

Report: Fickell, Chryst among Pitt candidates

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

There's a lot to blame Pitt athletic director Steve Pederson for where the discombobulated state of his football program is concerned. But at least it sounds like he's got a plan in the wake of Todd Graham's stunning departure.

And according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the first name mentioned as part of that plan is Iowa State head coach Paul Rhoads. The Post-Gazette reported Friday that Rhoads "appears to be the most coveted of the group [of potential candidates] as ... Pederson and chancellor Mark Nordenberg like and respect him and think he is an excellent football coach."

A former Panther defensive coordinator under Dave Wannstedt who spent eight seasons on the Pitt staff, Rhoads declined to speak to Pederson following Wannstedt's firing in 2010 out of loyalty to the Cyclones. But "according to two people close to Rhoads" who spoke to the Post-Gaztte, this time around Rhoads would be willing to sit down with Pitt and "likely will talk with the administration" regarding the opening.

UPDATE, 12:45 ET: Actually, you can probably forget the Rhoads talk; ISU announced Friday that Rhoads had signed a 10-year contract extension with the school.

With Rhoads presumably off the table, the focus will turn towards who the Post-Gazette reports is also on the Panthers' potential list of candidates: Ohio State assistant/2010 head coach Luke Fickell, Florida State defensive coordinator Mark Stoops, Wisconsin offensive coordinator Paul Chryst, Northern Illinois head coach Dave Doeren and former Illinois and Florida head coach Ron Zook. Pederson reportedly feels strongly enough in that pool of candidates that the school is forgoing the use of a search committee.

Fickell has reportedly already interviewed, with Chryst due to interview this Saturday. Given the upheaval around him in Columbus, Fickell may be the leading candidate until further notice.
Posted on: December 13, 2011 3:46 pm
Edited on: December 13, 2011 3:48 pm
 

Clemson expects Watkins to play after NCAA scare

Posted by Chip Patterson

Clemson's compliance office may believe that things could be quiet around exam time, with players hopefully focused on their studies and the start of bowl practice. But the Tigers' athletic department received a scare when they saw the name of ACC Rookie of the Year Sammy Watkins on a Christmas Party flier (pictured right, click here to enlarge) for a Florida-based restaurant. Watkins' association with a for-profit party like the "Naughty or Nice" themed shindig "Hosted by 239's hottest college football players" would be a violation of NCAA rules.

Luckily Clemson was able to nip this potential eligibility issue in the bud. CBSSports.com's Travis Sawchik reports that the university's compliance office sent a cease-and-desist notice to the restaurant. School spokesperson Tim Bourret "fully expects" Watkins to be available to play on Jan. 4 against West Virginia in the Orange Bowl.

While the Tigers are expecting Watkins to dodge this NCAA eligibility scare, head coach Dabo Swinney is not ready to welcome freshman running back Mike Bellamy back to the team at this point. Unspecified team rules saw Bellamy scratched from the ACC Championship Game on Dec. 3, and Swinney announced on Monday the indefinite suspension would last through the Orange Bowl. The highly-touted running back could be reinstated to the football program in January if he "does the right things," according to Swinney.

Bellamy's future with the Tigers is cloudy, with many reports of his discontent throughout the season only gaining credibility with his absence during Clemson's celebration of success. The coaching staff has been critical of the freshman's attitude and ball control issues, though no one has discredited the speed and natural ability of the Nocatee, Fla. native.

Keep up with all the latest on Clemson and West Virginia at the CBSSports.com Orange Bowl Pregame

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Posted on: December 12, 2011 4:05 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 4:06 pm
 

Arizona State interested in Whittingham

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Arizona State's search to replace Dennis Erickson has been an interesting one to follow. The school was originally in talks with, and made an offer to, Kevin Sumlin before those fell apart and Sumlin eventually ended up with Texas A&M. Then there was June Jones, who was actually being reported as the school's new head coach, but that deal fell apart at the last second as well.

So now Arizona State remains without a head coach while its conference mates like Washington State and Arizona have made big splash hires with Mike Leach and Rich Rodriguez. So where are the Sun Devils turning their attention to now?

Multiple reports have the school being interested in Utah's Kyle Whittingham. The Arizona Republic confirmed the interest on Monday.

Whittingham has been at Utah since 1994, moving up the ranks to become head coach in 2005 after some guy named Urban Meyer left to take a job at Florida. The Utes are 65-25 under Whittingham, including a 13-0 season in 2008 that ended with a 31-17 Sugar Bowl win over Alabama. However, Utah went 7-5 in its first season as a member of the Pac-12.

Whether Whittingham is interested in leaving Utah for Arizona State is a big question as well. He signed a 5-year contract worth $6 million following that Sugar Bowl victory, and still has two years left on the deal. So unless Arizona State is willing to offer a significant raise, I'm just not sure Arizona State is even much of a step up the coaching ladder for Whittingham, especially considering the history he has with the Utah program.
Posted on: December 9, 2011 6:00 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 6:06 pm
 

Report: Muschamp "targeting" Mike Shula for OC

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

In the wake of Charlie Weis's stunning departure for Kansas, Florida head coach Will Muschamp vowed that he would hire " the best offensive coordinator in the country." We're not sure the first name to bubble up as a serious candidate quite fits that bill.

From the Twitter feed of Gainesville Sun reporter Robbie Andrieu:



As a coach who's spent his entire career in the NFL with the exception of his largely ill-fated tenure in charge at Alabama, Shula certainly fits Muschamp's bill as a coordinator with pro experience who'd run a pro-style system in Gainesville. And he might quietly become a solid recruiter for the Gators as well; despite his struggles in Tuscaloosa, many of the players he brought to the Tide formed the foundation of the 26-2 2008 and 2009 teams, and he very nearly landed a Florida product you may have heard of named Tim Tebow.

But that's just about where the good news ends. Shula has only spent four seasons of his career as an offensive coordinator, all of them at the pro level with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers; in those four seasons, the Bucs landed in the league's bottom three three times and were never better than 22nd.

He didn't appear to do much for the Tide's offense during his Alabama stint, either. His four years there never produced an offense that ranked in the top half of the FBS, and the Tide's average rank in total offense during his tenure was a mediocre 76th.

Currently, Shula is serving as the Carolina Panthers quarterbacks coach after holding the same position for the Jacksonville Jaguars the past three seasons. Cam Newton is having a nice season under his tutelage, but is that reason enough for Muschamp to bite? Is his prior resume? We're not seeing it, which is why if we were a Gator fan, we'd be hoping Muschamp eventually wound up targeting some other candidate.
 
 
 
 
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