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Tag:Big East
Posted on: November 29, 2010 6:06 pm
 

Mountain West issues statement after losing TCU

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Following today's announcement by the Big East that the TCU Horned Frogs would be joining the Big East in 2012-13 in all sports, the nation turned its eyes back to the Mountain West Conference for some sort of reaction. After all, in TCU's six-year stay in the MWC, the Horned Frogs were one of the most successful members of the league, and could have been the catalyst for an automatic bid to be awarded out west (which still might happen, so that's worth mentioning).

Ah, but TCU went east, and now the MWC has to react. Here's the statement released earlier today by conference commissioner Craig Thompson:

"Today's intercollegiate athletics environment is very fluid," Thompson said. "Our Board of Directors and Directors of Athletics, as they have throughout the history of the MWC and with even more focus recently, will continue to analyze the landscape and chart our course in the context of ongoing changes. That includes conversations already underway with potential future members, as well as related discussions with our television and bowl partners.

"We appreciate the many contributions TCU has made to the growth and development of the Mountain West over the past six years. We look forward to shaping the future of the Conference in the coming months."

That's certainly a better response than Thompson's first draft, which was fifteen paragraphs of panicked expletives over and over. Probably. Maybe.

At any rate, losing TCU as a conference member is still a gutshot for the conference, as it sees its top football programs flee just as the WAC's top schools transition in. After all, even though TCU's scintillating 2010 campaign will still be "officially" considered in the MWC's bid to receive an automatic qualifier bid, is there any doubt that the BCS will find the conference lacking? There's no incentive for the BCS to actually bring the Mountain West into the fold -- just to maintain the appearance of due diligence. Shame, too, because it'd be nice to see that conference in a situation where it's not depending on one team to be perfect just to get the same shot at money as every other power conference gets. That arrangement didn't work for BYU , Utah , or TCU (all of whom have fled for more lucrative and forgiving situations), and Boise State shouldn't have to accept it either.

Posted on: November 29, 2010 4:53 pm
 

Thanks TCU: Mountain West BCS bid may not be dead

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The idea of an athletics program from deep in the football-obsessed heart of Texas playing in a basketball-driven conference centered in the Northeast megalopolis seems weird enough. But what might be even weirder about TCU 's move to the Big East is that their current undefeated season will help both their new league hold onto their BCS automatic bid ... and their former conference home in the Mountain West in their effort to do the same. The New York Times ' Pete Thamel explains :
The Big East is locked into the B.C.S. through the 2013 season, as it is included in the television and bowl contracts. The automatic qualification criteria for the B.C.S. after 2014 have not been determined. If the Big East were subject to a review of its part performance, T.C.U.’s 2010 season would count for the Big East in that review.

Here is where things get bizarre. T.C.U.’s 2010 regular season will also go toward the Mountain West’s bid toward gaining automatic qualification status for the 2012 and 2013 seasons, which will be evaluated in December 2011 ...

The cycles overlap because the conferences created a new evaluation period to coincide with the television contract. To do that, they overlap for two years, according to the B.C.S. executive director, Bill Hancock.
With the Horned Frogs safely in the fold, barring a total collapse on their part and a total failure on the part of the rest of the league to improve on their dreadful 2010 (remember that Cincinnati went undefeated as recently as last season) it seems unlikely the Big East will be in any real danger of losing their automatic bid.

The bigger question is what happens with the Mountain West, who has been derided in many corners today as a glorified WAC 2.0 after gaining Boise State , Nevada, Fresno State and Hawaii but losing bellwethers Utah , TCU, and BYU . Thanks to the overlap in evaluation periods, however, the league appears to have a fighting chance at getting their long-awaited auto-bid after all. The combination of TCU's (as well as Utah's) excellent 2010 seasons combined with Boise's three-year 36-2 run back to 2008 (which Thamel explains will also count in the MWC's calculations) should give them a solid foundation. The new-look MWC middle class of rapidly-improving San Diego State , Air Force , and the three other WAC refugees will, at the least, be a substantial upgrade on the middle class of the old WAC and maybe even the current MWC if the Aztecs, Wolf Pack, and Warriors can build on their current success.

Will that be enough? It's probably still too early to say. But it's also too early to say, as many have in the wake of TCU's decision, that the MWC's dream of ascending to the ranks of the automatic qualifying conferences is dead just yet.

Posted on: November 29, 2010 4:01 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2010 4:13 pm
 

Dennis Dodd talks TCU and the Big East

Posted by Tom Fornelli

There's not much question that the biggest news of the day in the college football world is the announcement that TCU will be joining the Big East in 2012.  The decision to move from the Mountain West to the Big East presents a lot of changes for TCU, the Big East, and the Mountain West, and our own Dennis Dodd sat down to discuss what it all means with Lauren Shehadi .



Posted on: November 29, 2010 12:50 pm
 

Big East could lose spot in Champs Sports Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Here's some news that the Big East will love to hear.  On the same day that the conference will make the announcement that TCU will be joining it in 2012, it sounds like one of the teams currently in the conference could miss out on a chance to go to the Champs Sports Bowl this season.  The bowl game has the option of replacing it's normal Big East tie-in every four years with Notre Dame, and it sounds like that may be the case this season.

Talking with the Chicago Tribune, Champs Sports Bowl CEO Steve Hogan says that the game will give strong consideration to Notre Dame following the Irish's victory over USC on Saturday night in southern California.

"I guess the way to say it is that they're a very attractive, strong candidate amongst maybe a short list of maybe one or two other teams that we're looking at, that have to really play out this coming Saturday," Hogan told the Tribune.

"They played their way back into it. Their whole body of work is pretty impressive, when you look at some of the losses and the closing wins. That's a team that certainly seems to be on the way up and that 7-5 is stronger than maybe it looks at first. They're right there in the middle of it, and we got maybe one or two other teams that can play their way into that argument Saturday. And then we'll debate it, knock it out and make a pick."

The one Big East team that the bowl is likely to consider over Notre Dame?  That would be West Virginia.  If the Mountaineers win this weekend against Rutgers, there's a chance they'd finish the year 9-3, ranked, yet out of the BCS picture should UConn beat South Florida and win the Big East.  If the Champs Sports Bowl wants to go with quality of team, it'd be hard to say that a 7-5 unranked Notre Dame team is better than a ranked 9-3 West Virginia team.

Of course, raise your hands if you think that bowl games actually care about that as much as they do filing seats and making money.

Exactly.  Something tells me the idea of having Notre Dame fans flocking to Orlando and filling the stadium will look a lot more appealing than West Virginia's ranking when all is said and done.  Whatever the case, we should know next Sunday.
Posted on: November 29, 2010 12:05 pm
 

Conference title games all set

J. Darin Darst

We still have a few regular season games left in the season that mean something, including Pac-10 teams trying to make a bowl (Arizona State and Washington), here is the schedule for the conference title games:

Dec. 3

MAC Championship: Northern Illinois (10-2) vs. Miami (Ohio) (8-4), 7 p.m. on ESPN2: Winner most likely goes to the Little Caesars Bowl, while the loser will be in either the GoDaddy.com or Humanitarian Bowl.

Dec. 4

C-USA Championship: UCF (9-3) vs. SMU (6-2), Noon on ESPN: Winner goes to the Liberty Bowl to most likely play either Georgia or Tennessee. If SMU loses they are probably headed to the Armed Forces Bowl on Dec. 30. The Armed Forces Bowl is being played in SMU's Ford Stadium this year. If UCF loses, look for the Knights to play Hawaii in the Hawaii Bowl on Christmas Eve.

SEC Championship: Auburn (12-0) vs. South Carolina (8-3), 4 p.m. on CBS: It's easy for Auburn. Win and it plays for the BCS National Championship, lose and it will be in the Orange Bowl. A South Carolina win puts the Gamecocks in the Sugar Bowl. A South Carolina loss will most likely send it to the Outback Bowl.

ACC Championship: Virginia Tech (10-2) vs. Florida State (9-3), 7:45 p.m. on ESPN: Winner goes to the Orange Bowl, while the loser probably ends up in the Chick-fil-A Bowl. If the Chick-fil-A Bowl chooses a different team, than the Champs Sports Bowl vs. Notre Dame would be the next spot.

Big 12 Championship: Nebraska (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. on ABC: Winner goes to the Fiesta Bowl, while the loser looks headed to the Alamo Bowl. The Cotton Bowl has the next pick out of the Big 12, but appears to be taking Texas A&M, so the loser of this game falls to the Alamo Bowl.

* Big East -- Connecticut at South Florida, 8 p.m. on ESPN2: A Connecticut wins, the Huskies go to either the Orange or Fiesta Bowl for the first time in history. If South Florida wins, than West Virginia wins the Big East and most certainly will play in the Orange Bowl.

 

 

Posted on: November 29, 2010 10:08 am
Edited on: November 29, 2010 10:18 am
 

Report: TCU accepts offer from Big East

Posted by Chip Patterson

After another release of the BCS standings moved us one step closer to an Oregon-Auburn national championship, TCU reportedly sealed the deal to make the jump to a BCS conference.  Brett McMurphy of AOL Fanhouse is reporting Monday that TCU has accepted an invitation to become an all-sports member of the Big East Conference.

TCU will join the league on July 1, 2012, and begin conference play in their new conference for the 2012-2013 school year.

For the Big East, the move comes just in time.  The current four-year evaluation period for the BCS ends in December 2011. While the Big East has not produced the contenders to warrant their AQ status in recent years, TCU's arrival will strengthen their prominence on paper significantly.  When the BCS heads get to crunching numbers, the Big East will get to report TCU's accomplishments (including their three Top 11 BCS finishes) along with the rest of the conference.  

For TCU, it is a perennial chance to arrive unaided in a BCS Bowl.  Not only does the Big East control an automatic bid to the Fiesta Bowl, but playing a full conference schedule against BCS AQ opponents should create a boost in the Horned Frogs' strength of schedule.  Many will argue that the current state of the Big East would not provide much of a boost, but the Horned Frogs will take their chances now with an automatic bid.  TCU also gets a huge boost by getting to add their other sports to an already massive conference in the Olympic sports.  While no one is expecting TCU to make an immediate play for the Big East basketball title, but playing in a league that garners so much more national attention will help raise the status of all of the Horned Frogs' sports teams.  

Posted on: November 28, 2010 3:47 am
Edited on: November 28, 2010 11:41 am
 

What I learned from the Big East (Nov. 27)

Posted by Chip Patterson

1.) With Win, South Florida Joins The State Elite - While Miami's loss to South Florida certainly jump-started some major program changes in Coral Gables, the Bulls' upset victory marked a significant moment in the USF program, and the career of first-year head coach Skip Holtz. South Florida has only been playing football since 1997, and only in Division I since 2001. The Bulls' victory over Miami gives a good portion of 2010's squad an in-state ACC sweep. A season ago, it was B.J. Daniels who stepped in for injured QB Matt Grothe to lead the Bulls to victory over Florida State in Tallahassee. This year, it was freshman quarterback Bobby Eveld who stepped in for the injured Daniels and led the team to a victory at Miami. Eveld completed only 8 of 15 passes for 120 yards, but managed the game well to help South Florida withstand a furious charge by Jacory Harris and the Hurricanes offense. For Skip Holtz, the win helped bring a good landmark for an otherwise rollercoaster first season as head coach for a BCS program. The struggling passing game did not spoken well for the offensive minded head coach, but Holtz has been able to coach up this squad from a 3-3 start to staring down a potential fifth straight 8+ win season. Accomplishing that will be more difficult than it sounds, with Jordan Todman and Connecticut coming to town playing for the conference title.

2.) Jordan Todman Leading Connecticut Title Surge - At the end of this definitive weekend in college football, South Florida was not the only new addition to make a statement in the Big East. Added to Division I officially in 2002 and the Big East in 2004, Connecticut stands one win from the first BCS bowl berth in program history. The Huskies have caught fire in the second half of the season, conveniently during the backlogged conference schedule. Wins over West Virginia and PIttsburgh has given Connecticut the tie-breaker edge against all the contenders, and now they control their own destiny. Much of the credit on the offensive end has to be credited to running back Jordan Todman. Todman has broken the 100 mark in 9 of his 10 games this season, and averaging 175.6 yards/game in his last three outings. Todman even left Saturday's showdown with Cincinnati and returned to finish with 31 carries on the day. So far there has been no stopping Todman, and if the Huskies can carry this win streak to the Fiesta Bowl Todman will start getting a lot more (deserved) attention from the league.

3.) Home Struggles Stain Otherwise Successful Season for Syracuse - The Orange have had one of their best seasons in nearly half a decade, but still something seems sour as Syracuse closed 2010 against Boston College on Saturday. After all, a team that hadn't seen a bowl game since 2004 should be excited about a seven win season. Right? Unfortunately, Syracuse fans will be asking the "What If's" for a long time after watching their team finish the season losing three home games in the last month of the season. At the end of October, Syracuse was 6-2 with a 3-1 conference record that had them in the early conference title talks. But the late season collapse that has been characterized by a stagnant offense has demoted the Orange to the middle of the pack in the Big East, simply playing for a bowl with better swag. As a former offensive assistant coach, those questions will have to be answered by Doug Marrone. However, it should be stated that Syracuse has done a great job turning the program around from their recent struggles. But when it comes time for season ticket renewals, don't be surprised if a 2-4 home record (0-4 against FBS teams) keeps ticket sales down in the Carrier Dome.

4.) The Backyard Brawl Could Have Two New Faces In 2011 - Heading into Friday's 103rd meeting of Pittsburgh and West Virginia, Ron Cook of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wrote that the losing coach might find themselves in danger of becoming unemployed. After all the dust cleared in West Virginia's 35-10 manhandling of the Panthers, there is a chance that both schools could be looking for new head coaches for 2011. Predictably, the late-season struggles of the Panthers have Dave Wannstedt on the hot seat in Pittsburgh, but recent reports suggest that West Virginia head coach Bill Stewart may be considering retirement. Both teams have been perennially competitive for the better part of five years, but neither squad has been able to capitalize on their fast starts in 2010. Stewart fell into his position after Rodriguez departed for Michigan, and Wannstedt was brought in to bring the Panthers to the "next level." Trips to the Meineke Car Care Bowl do not exactly count as "next level," and Wannstedt might want to think about taking some pens home from work.

Posted on: November 27, 2010 10:41 pm
Edited on: November 27, 2010 10:42 pm
 

Report: Bill Stewart to retire

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Suddenly there are quite a few big name schools with coaching vacancies to fill if you believe the reports circulating on Saturday night.  First we heard that Miami will be firing head coach Randy Shannon -- though this is yet to be confirmed -- and now it seems that West Virginia may have an opening as well.  

Though this one won't be due to a firing.

According to a report, West Virginia head coach Bill Stewart is going to retire at the end of the season.  This is from a report on EerSports.com, which is a pay site and can't be viewed without a subscription.  There has been no official word on this from West Virginia or Bill Stewart.

Still, the same report also says that former WVU assistant Rick Trickett who now serves as Florida State's assistant head coach is a top target to replace Stewart, along with both Terry and Tommy Bowden.

Stay tuned to CBSSports.com for more information on this story as it develops.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com