Tag:Chip Patterson
Posted on: February 10, 2012 12:46 pm
Edited on: February 10, 2012 2:34 pm
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Report: Big 12 schedule 'getting close,' not done

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE: CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy confirms the Big 12 schedule will not be released on Friday (Feb. 10).

The idea that the 2012 Big 12 conference schedule would be released on Friday (today) reportedly was just "the wishful thinking" of Texas Tech athletic directory Kirby Hocutt.

The Oklahoman's Travis Haney, citing a source within the league, says that Big 12 officials are "getting close" to completing the 2012 football schedule. Unfortunately for Big 12 fans - especially West Virginia fans - the slate will likely not be set by the end of this week.

CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy reported that the Big East and West Virginia have reached a $20 million settlement that would allow the Mountaineers to compete in the Big 12 for the upcoming season. The close timing of the buyout negotiations and the Big 12's intentions of putting out a 2012 conference schedule led to the concerns of West Virginia appearing on two different conference schedules. However, with legal issues behind them, the Mountaineers should be clear to complete a 10-team conference for competition in 2012.

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Posted on: February 9, 2012 3:18 pm
Edited on: February 9, 2012 3:38 pm
 

Roundtable: Backing the Big Ten plus-one

Posted by Eye on College Football



Occasionally the Eye on CFB team convenes Voltron-style to answer a pressing question in the world of college football. Today's query:

What are the chances of the BCS adopting the Big Ten's home-field semifinals playoff proposal? And if they do, how much of a good thing (if at all) is that for college football? 

Tom Fornelli: I think it's clear at this point that the playoff is coming. Whether or not it's going to be the Big Ten's proposal of the top two seeds hosting semifinal games, I'm not sure.

I do think that's the best way of going about things for the schools and fans, though. It would minimize travel costs for the schools, and it's the only way to make things fair. Hosting the games at places like the Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, Fiesta Bowl or Rose Bowl wouldn't be. Right now, if you're a Big Ten or Big 12 team and you land in the top two, you're not only traveling outside your home state but your entire conference footprint to play in those locations.

Plus, how exciting would it be to see a school like Florida possibly having to travel up north to play Wisconsin in Madison during December? We already know what happens to the Big Ten when it has to head south for the winter. With this proposal we'd get to see what happens to the SEC when it's forced to head north.

As for whether or not this would be a good thing for college football, I don't see how it would be a bad thing. You take a lot of the money that you've been giving to bowl games and put that cash into the schools. Plus, as long as you keep the playoff to the top four teams, get rid of the BCS AQ statuses and everything else, you can restore the bowl traditions that are so important to everybody.

Chip Patterson: I'm with Tom: I don't see how this could be a bad thing. I certainly understand there are plenty of concerns along the way, but any step in this direction is one I support.  

Allowing the top two seeds to host the semi-final games also keeps the integrity of the BCS system intact.  At its core, the system is meant only to determine the two best teams in college football.  Now those two teams will have the advantage of getting to play the gridiron's version of the Final 4 round on their home turf.    Those who are calling for a large-scale playoff would likely be appeased with this one step forward, and the bowl experience that means so much to the fans and players can continue as it has for years.  There is no rich tradition for the BCS National Championship Game itself, so altering the process at the top does not hinder the game of college football. 

Jerry Hinnen: I'm afraid I can see how this proposal could be, if not a bad thing, a worse thing than it should be. 

There's two downsides to the Big Ten's plan as presented. The first is that it proposes to yoink those top four teams out of the bowl pool entirely, meaning that the two semifinal losers wouldn't get the bowl experience at all, despite having the kind of season that would have put them in the BCS top four to begin with. If you're, say, Stanford and your postseason experience is traveling to Columbus to watch your season end in front of 100,000 Buckeye fans in 25-degree weather, I'm not sure at all that's going to feel like much of a reward. I'd much prefer the semifinals be played in mid-December, with the losers still eligible for BCS selection; it's better for the teams (who get their deserved week of bowl festivities) and better for the bowls (who get better matchups). 

The other downside is an unavoidable one: that this could be the first step down that slippery slope to the sort of eight- or 12- or 16-team playoff that sees the college football equivalent of the New York Giants ride a single hot streak past more deserving teams to a national championship. This is another reason the Big Ten proposal should do more to placate the major bowls--they've collectively taken a lot of heat for their role in preserving the BCS's current status quo, but their money and influence are also a key line of defense in ensuring the "plus-one" doesn't become a "plus-six."

But whatever downsides you come up with are always going to pale in comparison to the upside. The biggest flaw of the BCS has always been the No. 3 team that deserved its shot as much as either (or both) of the No. 1 and No. 2 teams and didn't get it, the team that -- as Phil Steele has called it -- needs to be in the playoff. The squabbles over No. 4 vs. No. 5 are going to continue, yes, but that's a small price to pay for giving 2001 Miami, 2003 USC, 2004 Auburn, 2010 TCU, or 2011 Oklahoma State their shot. Giving them that shot in an electric on-campus atmosphere -- be it in the Midwest, on the West Coast, the Southeast, wherever -- makes a huge triumph for college football that much more, well, huge.

Bryan Fischer: We're moving toward change, but what form it takes certainly remains to be seen. Let's be clear that there were something like 50 proposals presented at the last BCS meeting, so what's notable is not this specific Big Ten proposal but the fact that the conference has changed its tune and is open to some sort of playoff.


Jim Delany has two things he is looking to accomplish no matter what happens with the BCS: keep the Big Ten in a seat of power and protect the Rose Bowl. This proposal does both and seems to be a win-win for just about everybody. I think we're moving in the right direction and Delany is finally going with the flow instead of obstructing it.

Having seen how well things worked out for the Pac-12 with an on-campus championship game, I'm in favor of including a home field advantage tie-in no matter what proposal surfaces. The detractors are always worried about the regular season and keeping the bowl system and a plus-one/four-team playoff would make things meaningful during the year and keep the current structure (more Alamo Bowls!) in place. The most interesting thing, to me, will be how long we'll be stuck with the system. It could be a 10-plus year deal--which is interesting if tweaks need to be made in order to ensure a better playoff system.

TF: I would think that the any deal has to be longer than 10 years, just because conferences are going to want to keep things from expanding to 8 teams or 16 teams for as long as possible. Because we all know that as soon as the four-team playoff begins, then so will the "Expand the playoffs!" arguments. 

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview.

Posted on: February 8, 2012 3:33 pm
Edited on: February 8, 2012 3:41 pm
 

Texas Tech AD: No A&M games 'any time soon'

Posted by Chip Patterson

Texas A&M's move to the SEC after the completion of this academic year will end many of the Aggies' traditional football and basketball rivalries. Many have mourned the end of the annual Texas-Texas A&M matchups, but that won't be the only Lone Star rivalry that is coming to an end. Texas Tech will also no longer face the Aggies on a regular basis, and Red Raiders athletic director Kirby Hocutt does not believe it will happen again "any time soon."

Hocutt told the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal this week that the Red Raiders won't schedule Texas A&M in any sport unless the two schools commit to compete in all sports.

“We discussed it with all our head coaches,” Hocutt said, “and that’s something we as an athletic department and we as a group of coaches feel strongly about at this time.

“Our football schedule is set for the next two years. We’ll see if anything happens in the near future. But if down the road they’re interested in having that conversation, we would be willing to engage in it as well.”

Hocutt acknowledged that he has had conversations with Texas A&M athletic director Bill Byrne, but does not foresee any developments occurring in the near future.

“Any time you lose those games it’s unfortunate,” Hocutt said. “And it’s unfortunate that they’re not going to be in our league as we move forward. But that’s water under the bridge and if the rivalry can be resumed at some point in the future, then that would be considered at that time.”

The loss of the Texas Tech - Texas A&M rivalry is just another casualty of conference realignment. For all the latest news and updates, check out our Conference Realignment home.

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Posted on: February 8, 2012 10:10 am
Edited on: February 8, 2012 12:15 pm
 

VIDEO: Kyle Flood announced as head coach to team

Posted by Chip Patterson

When Rutgers athletic director Tim Pernetti was charged with the task of replacing Greg Schiano on short notice, one of his first interviews was offensive line and interim head coach Kyle Flood. In a 48 hour span, Flood was named the next head coach of the program and signed the only Top 25 recruiting class in the Big East.

Flood, the longest tenured assistant on Schiano's staff, was also a popular choice for the current roster. ScarletKnights.com provided this exclusive behind the scenes look at Flood's official introduction to the team after being hired as head coach.

(HT: Football Scoop)



For more on Rutgers' recruiting class, check out Bryan Fischer's Big East Signing Day Grades at the Eye On Recruiting.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 1:14 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 1:15 pm
 

Army hero Daniel Rodriguez's football dream

Posted by Chip Patterson

On National Signing Day, hundreds of aspiring college football players signed letters of intent to accept scholarships and attend FBS universities. Players come from all different kinds of backgrounds, but all have the same dream of suiting up in a Division I football game. 24-year-old Daniel Rodriguez shares that dream, but few can relate to his remarkable story.

Rodriguez served as an Army infantryman in both Iraq and Afghanistan, including earning a Bronze Star for Valor and a Purple Heart for his heroism in the Battle of Kamdesh - one of the bloodiest battles of the war in Afghanistan.

Upon his return, Rodriguez has worked to achieve a longtime goal and fulfill a promise to a good friend: play college football.

Rodriguez cites that promise to Pfc. Kevin Thomson, who was killed in the Battle of Kamdesh, as one of the inspirations on his quest to play football. He is currently enrolled in community college, striving to meet Division I academic requirements to play football.

Rodriguez, a long-time Hokie fan, has said he wants to play for Virginia Tech.

Rodriguez' story will be told in two parts on Dan Rather Reports, beginning Tuesday night on HDNet. The producer of the profile, T. Sean Herbert, offered an exclusive preview at Yahoo! Sports' The Post Game. I suggest you cruise on over to read Rodriguez's story, which includes descriptions of his heroic acts in the Battle of Kamdesh.  

But if you need more convincing, check out the American hero in action as he trains for the gridiron.



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Posted on: February 7, 2012 10:15 am
Edited on: February 7, 2012 10:22 am
 

Report: Stanford LB Skov charged with DUI

Posted by Chip Patterson

Stanford linebacker Shayne Skov was arrested for driving under the influence on Jan. 29, according to The Stanford Daily, citing a Stanford University Police Department report.

Skov, the Cardinal's leading tackler in 2010 - despite missing the first two games of the season - suffered a season-ending knee injury in the third game of the 2011 season. In regards to the late January arrest, Stanford head coach David Shaw issued a statement to the student newspaper.

"We have an expected standard of excellence and conduct for our football players and Shayne failed to adhere to those standards,” Shaw said Monday in a statement to The Daily through Jim Young, senior assistant athletic director of communications and media relations.

“It’s a matter we are taking very seriously,” Shaw said. “Shayne will be responsible to adhere to any legal responsibilities regarding this event, along with internal ramifications, which will be determined by the program."

Skov was on 2011 preseason watch lists for the Bednarik Award, Nagurski Trophy, and Butkus Award, and earned Pac-12 All-Academic honorable mention in 2011. The senior linebacker is expected to play a significant role in the Stanford defense in 2012.

For more on this story as it develops, follow Cardinal RapidReports.

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Posted on: February 6, 2012 3:22 pm
Edited on: February 6, 2012 4:06 pm
 

Report: Charges against Dre Kirkpatrick dropped

Posted by Chip Patterson

Former Alabama cornerback and 2012 NFL Draft prospect Dre Kirkpatrick did himself no favors with potential employers by getting charged with possession of marijuana less than a week after declaring for the draft. But according to the Sports Business Journal's Liz Mullen, the charges against Kirkpatrick have been dropped.

The details of the arrest indicate that Kirkpatrick claimed to be unaware of the drugs' presence when he was a passenger in a truck driven by former Alabama player Chris Rogers. The vehicle was pulled over in Bradenton, Fla. after being spotted driving on the wrong side of the road.

Kirkpatrick is listed as the No. 10 overall prospect in the 2012 NFL Draft, and Rob Rang has the Tide cornerback drafted by Dallas at No. 14 in his most recent NFL Mock Draft. Pro Football Talk's Evan Silva suggested that the arrest likely would not affect Kirkpatrick's draft stock, but the dropped charges should assist in putting this matter away and moving forward.

For all the latest player rankings and mock drafts, head over to our NFL Draft Home.

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Posted on: February 6, 2012 12:35 pm
Edited on: February 6, 2012 12:37 pm
 

Pac-12 extends Larry Scott's contract through '16

Posted by Chip Patterson

In a unanimous decision of all 12 university presidents, the Pac-12 has decided to extend the contract of Commissioner Larry Scott through 2016, with options to add two more years in the future.

“My fellow board members and I are delighted to have reached a long-term agreement with the commissioner to continue his excellent work on behalf of the Pac-12,” said Ed Ray, President of Oregon State University and Chairman of the Pac-12 Board in an official release. “We are on the brink of a period of extraordinary accomplishment and excellence throughout the Pac-12 and Larry’s continued leadership and vision for the Conference are critical elements in realizing that potential.”

Scott became commissioner of the Pac-12 in July 2009, after serving six years as Chairman and CEO of the Sony Erricsson WTA Tour. In his first two years with the conference, Scott has rebranded and reshaped the Pac-12's standing among the major NCAA conferences. He led the league through the first expansion since 1978, negotiated a record-setting media rights agreement with FOX and ESPN, is responsible for the creation of the Pac-12 Network, Pac-12 Digital Network, and helped delver equal revenue sharing for the first time in conference history.

Larry Scott, 47, has been praised for his innovation and leadership during arguably one of the most volatile periods for major conferences in college athletics. The media rights deal and creation of the Pac-12 Network has changed the landscape for negotiations in the future, and recently developed a globalization initiative "that will allow the conference to pursue new frontiers for member institutions."

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com