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Tag:Bob Stoops
Posted on: February 16, 2011 3:36 pm
 

Oklahoma gets their own "Black and Yellow"

Posted by Chip Patterson

Wiz Khalifa's #1 hit "Black and Yellow" has had several stages.  Orginally released in September, the song helped elevate Wiz's status from a merely grassroots artist to a member of mainstream hip-hop.  Then the song saw second and third life with a remix and thanks to the success of the Pittsburgh Steelers.  Now maybe you heard Lil Wayne's Green Bay homage "Green and Yellow," or maybe McDonalds' "Red and Yellow."  But this particular interpretation of the song doesn't exactly "bang out the trunk of my car."

Oklahoma safety Tony Jefferson has been pushing to get his version of the song, "Boomer Sooner," played on the radio around Norman.  He has been mostly utiizling Twitter, but today got some help on his campaign from Jake Trotter.  

The syncapation and verse structure aren't perfect, but you have to applaud the guy for trying.  Some particularly relevant digs at Florida State, and of course proclaimation of Oklahoma's title run plans in 2011.   



Tip O' The Hat
: The Oklahoman via NewsOk.com
Posted on: January 31, 2011 7:10 pm
 

How important is a coach's age to winning titles?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Virginia Tech-centric blog Gobbler Country posted an interested study today, examining the breakdown of championship-winning coaches' ages in the modern era of college football. The question raised is "how old is too old," and excepting some obvious outliers, the answer is "younger than you think."

For the champions, I used the BCS from 1998-present, the coaches' poll from 1982-1997 and the AP poll from 1960-1981.

Time span Avg. Age
1960-69 46.4
1970-79 51.0
1980-89 48.6
1990-99 55.6
2000-10 49.9
BCS Era 55.1
1960-2010 51.3

The ages of head coaches have fluctuated from mid 40s to mid 50s since 1960, but the average has been a little over 51 years of age. However, there has been one coach that has helped break the curve. Take away Bobby Bowden's two titles and the average in the 90's shrinks to 52.8 and the BCS era shrinks to 53.8.

What's even more unsettling to programs with older coaches is the breakdown of championships by age bracket:

Age Span Champs
< 40 5
40-44 9
45-49 9
50-54 14
55-59 9
60 + 5

Not only is there a precipitous dropoff from the early 50s to 60+, those five titles were won by just three coaches: The aforementioned Bowden with two, Bear Bryant with two, and Joe Paterno -- the three most celebrated coaches of the modern era of I-A football. What's more, Bryant had won his first title at the age of 50, while Paterno won his first at 56. Bowden didn't win his first until he was 64, but that was after six straight top-five finishes in the final poll for Florida State. In other words, each of those three coaches firmly established his national championship bona fides before his 60th birthday, while every other coach who ever hit 60 in the last 50 years was quite evidently past his prime.

It's not really surprising, then, to have seen Maryland jettison longtime head coach Ralph Friedgen, who was 63 at the end of the 2010 and who clearly wasn't about to win a title at such a mediocre football school (no offense, Terps, but let's be honest). Incoming coach Randy Edsall will have just turned 53 at the outset of the 2011 season, and while one might joke that Maryland's only got two seasons of Edsall in his prime before it all goes downhill, it's not as if he's got 15 years in front of him with the Terrapins.

So with all this in mind, here are a few more notable coaches and their ages as of the start of the 2011 season. It would be incorrect to say there's a "new generation" of coaches on the move (seven years or so doesn't really constitute a generational gap) but it's pretty clear that a few of these guys aren't lasting much more than five years -- especially if they're not winning 10 games a year anymore.

Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech, 64
Mack Brown, Texas, 60
Gene Chizik, Auburn, 49
Kirk Ferentz, Iowa, 56
Al Golden, Miami, 42
Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State, a man, 44
Brady Hoke, Michigan, 52
Brian Kelly, Notre Dame, 49
Chip Kelly, Oregon, 47
Lane Kiffin, USC, 36
Mike Leach, free agent, 50
Les Miles, LSU, 57
Dan Mullen, Mississippi St., 39
Will Muschamp, Florida, 40
Joe Paterno, Penn State, 84
Gary Patterson, TCU, 51
Bo Pelini, Nebraska, 43
Chris Petersen, Boise State, 46
Bobby Petrino, Arkansas, 50
Mark Richt, Georgia, 51
Nick Saban, Alabama, 59
Bob Stoops, Oklahoma, 50
Jim Tressel, Ohio State, 58
Kyle Whittingham, Utah, 51

Now obviously, not all of these schools are going to win national championships in the next 5-10 years. But by and large, most of these schools do pay their coaches a gigantic salary -- to the point that the expectation of competing on a national level is inevitable. If a coach is struggling in his fourth or fifth year with a program, is an athletic director going to be more apt to fire the coach if he's 57 instead of 47? Is that age discrimination, or common sense?

Posted on: January 22, 2011 8:45 pm
 

Two Oklahoma players arrested Friday night

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Two of the Oklahoma Sooners' most promising freshmen, WR Kenny Stills and safety Tony Jefferson (both 2010 starters), were arrested overnight on misdemeanor charges. According to the Tulsa World, Stills was arrested for driving under the influence and Jefferson was arrested for interference with the official process at 2:10 this morning.

Both men are 19, and while that's not particularly important in Jefferson's case, it is regarding Stills; like most states, Oklahoma law has a zero-tolerance policy toward underage drinking, so if Stills had any amount of alcohol in his system at all -- even a 0.01 BAC -- he was subject to arrest. It's worth noting that the two players are both California natives, where the standards are the same, so neither can claim ignorance of the law, but still, it's possible that Stills' major mistake was being two years too young.

As Jefferson, well, all he's being charged with is interference and not any other crime, so it's likely that he protested Stills' arrest process a little too much and got himself in trouble for it. Foolish, yes, but 19-year-olds tend to overreact at times.

All of which is to say, it's important to wait for details to come out from these arrests before reacting with any hysterics; the possibility remains that Stills had a beer, then was driving with Jefferson somewhere when they were pulled over for what they perceived to be a DWB. One guy gets breathalyzed, one guy gets upset, both get arrested, and here we are. It's also equally possible, of course, that Stills and Jefferson were both hammered and had no business being in a moving vehicle at all. That's not off the table either. The details are going to be crucial before branding these guys as "brainless thugs" or just college kids making college mistakes (or anything inbetween).

Bob Stoops has yet to release a comment on the arrests.

Posted on: January 14, 2011 2:11 pm
 

What I learned from the Big 12: Bowl Edition

Posted by Tom Fornelli

1. Oklahoma can crush Cinderella in a BCS bowl.  Just as long as Cinderella makes her way to the ball through a BCS conference.  After years of being woken up in the middle of the night due to nightmares about the Statue of Liberty, Ian Johnson and blue grass, Bob Stoops can finally get a good night's sleep.  Sure, beating UConn isn't exactly going to make the country stand up and notice Oklahoma, but at least the Sooners finally get to head into an offseason with some positive momentum behind them.  With Landry Jones and Ryan Broyles both coming back next season, the Sooners are the easy pick to be favored in the Slightly Smaller 12 and should contend for another national championship.

2. Though Oklahoma State may have a different opinion about that.  The Cowboys put the finishing touches on a season that saw the team fall six points shy of toppling their in-state rivals and playing for their own conference championship.  It seems like every season we say that "this could be the year" for Oklahoma State, and the Cowboys inevitably fall short of expectations.  This year, they surpassed them. With an easy win over Arizona in the Alamo Bowl, and the prospect of having Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon back next year, the Cowboys should make some more noise in 2011.

3. Kansas State may not celebrate anything ever again.  It wasn't the most important bowl game of the season by any means, but the end of the Pinstripe Bowl is a memory that is likely to stick with me for a while.  I know the Wildcats will remember it.  What was a great game was marred by a bad call at the end when Adrian Hilburn was called for unsportsmanlike conduct following a touchdown when saluting the crowd.  This decision cost Kansas State a chance to win the game as the Wildcats were forced to attempt a game-tying two-point conversion from the 18-yard line.

4. While we're on the subject of the Big Ten taking things from the Big 12.  Farewell to the Nebraska Cornhuskers, who now move on to the Big Ten for the 2011 season.  Judging by Nebraska's performance against Washington in the Holiday Bowl, it's a move that couldn't have come quick enough for the Huskers.  After losing to Oklahoma in the final Big 12 Championship, Nebraska didn't look like a team with anything much to play for against Washington.  As odd as it will feel to see Nebraska playing in the Big Ten next season, it'll be stranger still to not see them playing in the Big 12.
Posted on: January 13, 2011 3:39 pm
 

Ex-Iowa RB Wegher on way to Oklahoma

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

After disappearing from the Iowa football roster just ahead of the 2010 season and never returning, it looked like Brandon Wegher's FBS career might be over. But it looks like we haven't heard the last of the bruising running back and (relatively rare) four-star prospect out of Iowa just yet, as Wegher publicly stated today that he will be transferring to Oklahoma to continue his career as a walk-on.

At a glance, Wegher's hard-nosed running style might not make him seem like the best fit for the Sooners' wide-open offense, but after rushing for 641 yards and a school-record right touchdowns as a true freshman for the Hawkeyes, it wouldn't be wise to count Wegher out. And as a walk-on rather than a scholarship transfer who's already missed a year of playing time, Wegher may be able to avoid the typical transfer year spent on the bench.

The best part of the news for Oklahoma? With Wegher walking on and hoping to earn a scholarship later, there's no risk involved for Bob Stoops and Co. (assuming Wegher's much-rumored-about "personal reasons " that led to his falling-out with Iowa become an issue, which seems unlikely). If Wegher can't crack the playing rotation, no scholarship harm, no foul.

And as for Wegher, if he can, he'll be part of a potential preseason No. 1 team and the certain favorites to bring hom a second straight Big 12 championship. It's a win-win situation for everyone involved ... save, we suppose, the Iowa fans who may have to watch their native son go on to glory with someone else.

Posted on: January 6, 2011 10:44 pm
Edited on: January 6, 2011 10:46 pm
 

Ryan Broyles returning to Oklahoma

Posted by Chip Patterson

Stanford quickly became an early favorite for 2011 with Andrew Luck's announcement that he will be returning to school next fall.  You can go ahead and add Oklahoma to that list of early favorites with wide receiver Ryan Broyles also announcing his return for 2011.  

"Personally, I know I can mature as a person and a player and get myself better prepared for the NFL," he said in his official release. "I want to win more championships and break every record possible as a receiver. I'm fortunate to have the players around me who can help me achieve those goals."

Broyles finished the regular season as the nation's leader in receptions per game, and third in receiving yards per game.  With Landry Jones still under center, there isn't any reason to believe they can't repeat some of that success again next year.  Also, Broyles' announcement came one day after linebacker Travis Lewis announced he would return to Norman for his senior season to win a championship.  

Bob Stoops' team was frequently overlooked as a contender in 2010, because of road losses to Missouri and Texas A&M.  But with a Big 12 Championship and Fiesta Bowl title under their belt, next year's squad is focused on reclaiming the top spot in college football.
Posted on: January 2, 2011 2:38 am
 

Bowl Grades: Fiesta Bowl

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Oklahoma outpaced Connecticut en route to a 48-20 Fiesta Bowl victory.

Oklahoma

Offense: Landry Jones set an Oklahoma bowl passing record with 433 yards through the air, and he was able to find wideouts Ryan Broyles and Cameron Kenney (both of whom had over 150 receiving yards) without much trouble. Broyles' touchdown catch was the type of play that exemplified his All-American season: an absolutely brilliant display of athleticism. DeMarco Murray wasn't a gamebreaker, but his 25 carries for 93 yards kept the chains moving -- he accounted for eight of Oklahoma's 27 first downs. Jones did throw a pick-six and Broyles coughed up a fumble at the end of an otherwise brilliant punt return, but those were relatively minor concerns. Grade: B+

Defense: Giving up 20 points is sort of a bummer, right? Thing of it is, though, UConn scored one touchdown on the aforementioned pick-six, and the other came on a kickoff return. Also, Jamell Fleming and Tony Jefferson each took an interception to the house in the second half, pushing the game out of reach for UConn. So essentially, the Oklahoma defense outscored the Huskies' offense 14-6. That's a win. Grade: A

Coaching: Well, Bob Stoops finally got that BCS bowl losing streak off his back. Shame that it had to come against such a comically overmatched opponent, but that's probably of limited concern to Stoops and the Sooners. It's hard to fault Stoops for any play calls or in-game decisions, except for that fake field goal early in the fourth quarter. Everyone in the world knows Stoops doesn't have a great deal of confidence in kicker Jimmy Stevens, who doesn't have a field goal of longer than 41 yards this year, so when OU lined up for a field goal on 4th and 7 at the UConn 30, nobody really expected a kick to go up. Further, Jones passed for 8.8 yards per attempt on the day; let the kid make another play!  Grade: B-

Connecticut

Offense: It's painfully obvious that UConn quarterback Zach Frazer doesn't have much in the way of help at receiver. The senior QB had rather pedestrian numbers again tonight (19-39, 223 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs), but several of Frazer's throws were dropped, tipped, or aimed somewhere other than where the receivers ended up going. Even on Frazer's two pick-sixes, both passes hit his receivers in the hands before being deflected up and into a Sooner's hands. It was sort of painful to watch. Jordan Todman did rush for 121 yards after a slow start, however, and Anthony Sherman and Ryan Griffin were decent targets between the 20s. Grade: D+

Defense: The Huskies' main highlight on defense was the "look what I found" interception score by Dwayne Gratz in the second quarter that first got UConn on the board, but that was pretty much it. Landry Jones found open receivers nearly every time he dropped back to pass, and Oklahoma was only forced into four punts in 14 possessions on the day. Grade: D

Coaching: Randy Edsall 's first foray into the BCS bowl world didn't go well, but that was pretty much a given considering the matchup. Connecticut's execution was sufficiently bad that it's hard to pin much on Edsall's playcalling, and the Huskies at least made Oklahoma work for its victory; this was still a 14-point game with eight minutes left in the fourth quarter. It's hard to say whether Edsall will ever make it back to a BCS game -- his odds are probably better at a stronger school than UConn -- but he didn't look bad today. Grade: B

Final Grade

Look, nobody outside of Storrs, CT and whatever lair BCS president Bill Hancock resides in wanted this game to happen. The final score was pretty predictable, even though UConn stuck around for a little longer than most people would have expected. It would have been great to see this high-powered Oklahoma offense face a real defense, like that of Stanford or TCU or Boise State . But the rules are what they are, and this is what we get because of them: an afterthought of a Fiesta Bowl. Connecticut didn't belong in a BCS game, everybody knew it, and they proved why today. Can we really not get an "automatic unless you're a four-loss team" clause in the BCS language? Really? This game's very existence was unacceptable. Grade: F

Posted on: December 22, 2010 12:43 pm
 

Bob Stoops loves you, Oklahoma

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Whenever there is a big program looking for a head coach it seems inevitable that at some point Bob Stoops' name will come up as a candidate at the school.  It always sounds as if he's about to leave Oklahoma too.  Last year he was leaving Oklahoma for Notre Dame before Brian Kelly ended up getting the job.  This year he was on his way to Florida before Will Muschamp was hired.

On Tuesday Stoops talked to the media for the first time since the Sooners won the Big 12 championship and, as you'd expect, he was asked about the Florida rumors and why he stays at Oklahoma.

Well, it's simple, really.  He loves you, Oklahoma.

“I like everything about it here,” Stoops said. “First and foremost, the community, the area. All of that. But I would say maybe tied with first and foremost is our president and athletic director. I think too much of the time, when people talk about opportunities you have, to work with David Boren, his track record is pretty incredible, his leadership in the university, and his strength in building our program has been pretty good, too. Same thing with our athletic director as well. Joe Castiglione, there’s not a guy that works harder in the country. 

“Guys have a vision to help you build and improve your program, because it doesn’t just happen with me. 

“I have two of the best leaders in the country to help me do that. ... Your working environment is the biggest factor.

“I’m a regular guy, like anybody. I like the community. People are down to earth and approachable and friendly. My family enjoys that. I guess what everybody else enjoys about living in a great community. It’s a great place to live.”

Of course, that doesn't mean he's never going to leave.  While Stoops is only 29 wins shy of passing Barry Switzer for most wins in school history, and has said that he'd like to match the three titles both Switzer and Bud Wilkinson, he realizes he can't see the future or what will happen.  He says he's still young enough to know that things could change at the school, and that if they do, he may leave at some point.

So I guess that means he'll be rumored to be heading somewhere else next season.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com