Tag:Paul Johnson
Posted on: July 24, 2011 6:44 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 11:31 am
 

Roddy Jones likes O-line development, RB depth

Posted by Chip Patterson

Sunday was dedicated to the players at the ACC Football Kickoff. Two representatives from each of the 12 schools made their rounds with the media. This was my takeaway from Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech is ready to get football started. After a dismal 6-7 season that ended with a 14-7 loss to Air Force in the Independence Bowl and the new NCAA sanctions that vacated their 2009 ACC Championship, the Yellow Jackets are ready to write some new history on the field. Fifth-year senior Roddy Jones was the elder representative for the team in Pinehurst on Sunday, and he was excited to talk about the upcoming season. Georgia Tech's spring practices received mixed reviews, but one thing that was obvious in the Yellow Jacket's "T-Day" spring game was an improvement on the defensive side of the ball. Jones elaborated on what has made the unit better on Sunday.

"I see a lot of athleticism on [the defensive] side of the ball," Jones explained. "They're starting to understand more, and they are going to fly around this year. One thing you will definitely see is guys running to the football, like I said a lot of athleticism. They are going to be very talented and very fast, and hopefully hungry."

Of course, some have argued that the strong showing by the defense in intrasquad scrimmages has been due to a significantly weaker offensive line. Head coach Paul Johnson said after the spring game that the quarterbacks were "running for their lives." According to Jones, the line has been a spot where the players have focused on improvement over the summer - all under the leadership of All-ACC offensive lineman Omoregie Uzzi.

"I've seen a whole lot of work put in by the offensive line. Uzzi has done a great job of organizing them and having them talk through things," Jones said. "He's kind of the elder statesman on the offensive line, between him and Phil Smith. He's done a great job of making sure everyone gets on the same page, because it all starts with them. We can't do anything without [the offensive line], and they understand that. Omoregie knows what it's like to be a part of a really good offensive line, one that won us an ACC Championship. So he's been really driving that home for the young guys."

As far as the guys behind that line? It's a crowded group of players all looking for their touches, thankfully Paul Johnson's option offense allows for plenty of rushers to find time on the field.

"There's a lot of depth in the backfield," Jones elaborated. "We've got probably 4 or 5 guys at A-back who have a lot of playing time and a lot of experience. We've got 4 guys at B-back who can all play. They might not have the experience that we have at A-back, but they are all very talented, ready, and hungry to show what they can do. I think everyone does a great job of being ready when their time comes and that's what it's about."
Posted on: July 19, 2011 5:21 pm
Edited on: July 19, 2011 5:49 pm
 

Georgia Tech's Johnson blasts NCAA decision

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Georgia Tech head coach Paul Johnson has long had a reputation for saying exactly what's on his mind--no more, no less.

And the reason he has that reputation is interviews like the one published today by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, in which Johnson flat-out unloads on the NCAA decision to vacate the Yellow Jackets' 2009 ACC championship. A few choice comments:
“The NCAA can’t take away the memories or what happened on the field. Let’s say somebody took something illegal. I’m still not convinced that happened, but let’s say it did. Well, you’re punishing 115 guys who didn’t do anything but work their butt off" ...

"If we were trying to cover the thing up, we would’ve just said that [athletic director] Dan [Radakovich] never told me anything. Their perception of what happened and my perception of what happened wasn’t close.”

Johnson’s perception: “That they came in here and talked to seven or eight kids and they didn’t find what they were looking for.

“I’ve been in this business a long time. You see all the things that are going on in college sports today, and you get slammed for this? I mean, come on now ...

“If you went out and you did something to gain a competitive advantage, if  you knew you cheated or you paid somebody, it might be easier to swallow,” Johnson said. “But when you don’t feel like you’ve done anything wrong, it’s tough to take.”

We don't blame Johnson at all for being upset. Having the ACC title stripped -- the AJC reports the championship trophy has been moved to a closet -- and four years' worth of probation hanging over the program is a tough blow for a coach who by the NCAA's own admission did nothing wrong.

But if there's anything the NCAA has been consistent about in handing down its recent rulings, it's that (say it with me) the cover-up is worse than the crime. Tech officials prepping athletes Demaryius Thomas and Morgan Burnett for interviews with NCAA investigators after being specifically told not to isn't the worst offense in the world, but there's not much question it does fall underneath the "cover-up" umbrella.

And as for "competitive advantage," Tech was cautioned that star receiver Thomas had "eligiblity questions" and played him against Clemson in the ACC title game anyway. No, it's not "paying somebody" (to use Johnson's term), but if using a player you know could be ineligible -- and was later proven to be -- isn't a "competitive advantage," then what is?

So we sympathize with Johnson's plight, and appreciate his candor. But we can't quite bring ourselves to agree with him that the NCAA overstepped its bounds, either.


Posted on: July 14, 2011 10:38 am
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Georgia Tech announcing alleged NCAA violations

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE: The NCAA will make an announcement at 3 p.m. with the information related to the alleged violations.  University president Bud Peterson and athletic director Dan Radakovich will respond to the charges at 4:30 p.m..  Keep it here at the Eye on College Football (and follow us on Twitter) for updates throughout the day.
---------------
Georgia Tech
was informed Thursday morning of some alleged violations by the NCAA. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the violations occurred in the football program "within the past several years."

An official announcement of the findings has been scheduled for 3 p.m. today.

The Yellow Jackets are only a half-decade separated from their last NCAA sanctions, which were tied to a misunderstanding of an academic eligibility rule. In 2003, the school learned that 17 academically ineligible players competed during the 1998 and 1999 seasons. As a result, the Yellow Jackets self-imposed a two-year probation, scholarship cuts and a reduction in signing classes in 2005 and 2006.

The NCAA recommended that Georgia Tech also vacate wins, but the school won its appeal and the victories stood.
Posted on: April 26, 2011 3:00 pm
Edited on: April 26, 2011 3:04 pm
 

What I learned this spring: ACC Coastal

Posted by Chip Patterson

With all six spring games completed, we wrap up spring practice in the ACC Coastal Division.

DUKE: Head coach David Cutcliffe exits his fourth spring practice with the Blue Devils with as much optimism as ever, but knows that the 2011 Blue Devils have some work to do before kicking off the season against Richmond on Sept. 3.

"A successful day," Cutcliffe said after the spring game. "But I told them this is just the beginning. In college football now, [you have] the remainder of the spring term to work on weights and conditioning. And a summer that's going to very important to a young team."

Almost two-thirds of the Blue Devils roster is made up of freshman and sophomores. While youth can easily breed optimism, there is also a realistic expectation that this group needs to put in more work on the fundamentals this summer. Duke does have the benefit of returning both pieces of their quarterback rotation from 2010. Junior Sean Renfree will remain the starting quarterback, coming off a pleasantly surprising 3,131 yard, 14 touchdown season. Sophomore Brandon Connette will continue in his role as a run-first quarterback in rotation with Renfree, but the spring has shown some improvement in Connette's passing game. Defensively, we didn't learn much about Duke this spring due to widespread injuries across the unit. If anything the injuries made a talented Blue Devils offense look spectacular at times. Duke will likely not be able to escape a similar bowl-less fate in 2011, but at least now they have the athletes on the roster to remain competitive.

GEORGIA TECH: Georgia Tech set out to improve defensively this spring and try to focus on special teams. The good news is that the Yellow Jackets defense finished spring practice looking much better than the offense. Which might actually reveal more issues with the offense than it does compliment the defensive improvement. At different times this spring, both Tevin Washington and Synjyn Days have struggled in scrimmage situations against the first-team defense. Both quarterbacks have struggled to find a rhythm, and as head coach Paul Johnson said, they have been "running for their lives" on the field.

The defense was highlighted this spring by players like defensive end Jason Peters and inside linebacker Quayshawn Nealy, who entered spring practice as a backup. Nealy, a redshirt freshman, has seen time with the first-string this spring due to injuries to Julian Burnett and Daniel Drummond. He has made the most of the opportunity, capping off his spring by leading the Yellow Jackets in tackles during their annual T-Day game. Paul Johnson also wanted to increase the mistakes in the special teams after last season. Unfortunately that is not completely solved as Georgia Tech's kickers combined for misses from 28, 47, and 49 yards in the T-Day game.

MIAMI: Miami's spring has been much publicized due to the arrival of new head coach Al Golden . Therefore it should come as no surprise that we learned just as much (if not more) about Golden's vision for the Miami football program this spring than we did about the actual players on the roster. In following the Hurricanes this spring one word stands out to describe Golden's brief time at Miami: demand.

Golden demands that Miami play, practice, and think at a fast pace. He demanded that the Hurricanes get in better shape, and instituted a rigorous winter conditioning program. He demanded that players need to earn starting positions, and that is obvious with the unusually fluid final spring depth chart.

But will all these demands and the implementation of a new attitude around Miami catch on in time for the 2011 season? There are still plenty of question marks on the field, most notably the ongoing quarterback battle between Jacory Harris and Stephen Morris. The Hurricanes have a stable of running backs and a solid offensive line that should provide stability to the offense, and take some pressure of whichever signal-caller ends up as the starter. If nothing else, Golden has brought hype back to "The U." More than 300 former players showed up for the Hurricanes' spring game in Ft. Lauderdale, a who's who of active and retired NFL players.

Something else I learned from Miami this spring? I really need to get a Michael Irvin alarm clock.



NORTH CAROLINA: - While several former North Carolina defenders are preparing to hear their name called this weekend in the NFL draft, many of the stars from 2010's defense are still in Chapel Hill preparing for next fall. If anything, the spring showed us that the heart of of the Tar Heels' defense will be on the defensive line. The Tar Heels will be able to rotate 8-9 defensive lineman, highlighted by Quinton Coples, Jared MacAdoo, and Donte Paige-Moss. Much of the depth and added experience on the defensive line is due to the suspensions of Marvin Austin and Robert Quinn forcing players into positions unexpectedly before the season started. One of the things that makes North Carolina's line especially dangerous is the ability of several players to play multiple positions. Both Coples and MacAdoo are able to play inside or out, and that versatility can benefit a team when injuries hit during the long season. One of the biggest surprises on the already deep defensive line has been the play of junior college transfer Sylvester Williams. Williams has been building buzz since he arrived in Chapel Hill, and could end up challenging Jordan Nix for a starting defensive tackle job by next fall. North Carolina's secondary is a concern once again, making it even more important for the defensive line to put pressure on the quarterback to prevent opposing wide receivers from getting space down the field.

Offensively much of the focus will be on quarterback Bryn Renner, who is taking over for four-year starter T.J. Yates. Renner showed promise at times this spring, but he is still getting accustomed to his new role as leader of the offense. Thankfully he'll have Dwight Jones and Erik Highsmith to throw to, and an experienced offensive line to give him time to operate. Ryan Houston was a touchdown machine in 2009, but after redshirting last season and undergoing shoulder blade surgery this summer the depth at running back will be a concern heading into the fall.

VIRGINIA: Earlier this year, head coach Mike London made headlines by pulling in yet another unexpectedly strong class on National Signing Day. Unfortunately, these small victories will take some time before they translate into more marks in the "W" column for the Cavaliers. This spring did not answer many of the questions that existed near the end of last year's four-win season. Defensively, the Cavaliers return seven starters from a unit that finished only better than Duke and Wake Forest in both scoring and total defense. Improvement from those numbers will be necessary considering the lack of offensive firepower.

Virginia rotated through four different quarterbacks during their spring game (Michael Rocco, Ross Metheny, Michael Strauss, and David Watford), but no candidate stood out among the group. The offensive line has been porous, and the Cavaliers still lack an answer at running back as well. What did I learn about Virginia? Greener pastures may lie in their future, but unless someone steps up to make the Cavaliers a threat on offense they will have a difficult time keeping up with opponents in 2011.

VIRGINIA TECH: Not to drone on about new quarterbacks, but when a sophomore takes over for the ACC Player of the Year it is going to turn some heads. Logan Thomas has looked impressive this spring, grabbing most of the positive notes out of Blacksburg across the last several weeks. He finished spring practice as the star of the spring game, throwing for 131 yards and two touchdowns while also leading the Hokies in rushing with 46 yards on just five carries. However, Thomas' impressive performance did showcase some depth issues for the Hokies on offense. With starting running back David Wilson away with the track team, backup running backs Daniel Dyer, Josh Oglesby, and James Hopper struggled against the Hokies' defense in the spring game. Last season head coach Frank Beamer had the benefit of three NFL-caliber running backs to choose from, right now it looks like Wilson is the only competent option. The backup quarterbacks did not fair well either, with second-string Ju-Ju Clayton completing just three of his ten passes, and tossing two interceptions.

Defensively, Virginia Tech's returning talent seems charged up by the 40-12 lashing they took from Andrew Luck and Stanford in the Orange Bowl. The competition on the field has been aggressive, and defensive coordinator Bud Foster has not backed down from calling his team's performance in that game "unacceptable." Players to keep an eye on heading into the fall include linebacker Tariq Edwards and defensive end James Gayle, who was voted the spring defensive MVP. For those still curious, wide receiver Danny Coale did punt in the spring game and is still considered in the running for the job come fall.
Posted on: March 30, 2011 5:23 pm
Edited on: March 30, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: Georgia Tech

Posted by Chip Patterson

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice . So we here at the Eye on College Football  will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at Georgia Tech, who started spring practice on Monda
y.

Will Georgia Tech be able to erase the turnovers and mental mistakes that plagued them in 2010?

Coming into the 2010 season, Georgia Tech was riding pretty high. The Yellow Jackets were fresh off an ACC Championship and a BCS bowl berth. Head coach Paul Johnson's flexbone option offense was working immediately, delivering at least a share of two Coastal Division crowns in his first two seasons at the helm. With a preseason #16 ranking, Georgia Tech held the fate of the 2010 season in their hands.

Then they dropped it, literally.

Georgia Tech fumbled the ball 20 times in 2010, more that any other team in Division I. The turnovers and mental mistakes were not the only reason that Georgia Tech finished with their worst record since 1994, but they certainly played a big role in the Yellow Jackets' struggles. A fumbling issue is particularly damaging for a team that rushes the ball an average of 57.9 times a game. For comparison, the rest of the ACC averaged 30-40 rushing attempts per game. But the Jackets not only led the conference with 323.31 yards per game, but also in yards per carry. So clearly the offense was working, as long as the Yellow Jackets were holding onto the ball.

So what was the issue for Georgia Tech? One word that has been floating around Atlanta as spring practice has kicked off is "complacency."

“I think there was a sense of complacency to a degree,” Johnson told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “Not with everybody. But when you win nine games the first year and then you win 11 games, I think some guys just think, ‘Well, this is going to happen again.’ It doesn’t work like that.”

So for starters, the Yellow Jackets will be focusing on a new mentality this spring. According to Johnson, inspiring this bunch didn't take much extra push from the coaching staff. All any of the Yellow Jackets would need to do is think back to the horrendous 14-7 Independence Bowl loss to Air Force. With two muffed punts to compliment three lost fumbles an interception, it was the perfect microcosm of what went wrong with the Yellow Jackets last season.

“Our guys aren’t dumb, they know what happened,” Johnson said. “We’re light years ahead of where we were last year at this time. We have a lot more togetherness as a group. You can see our focus, our desire. I can look out my office window [onto the practice field] and see guys working, doing things we didn’t do last year. There’s a different aura.”

The aura is different and so will be a lot of the faces in 2011. Georgia Tech only returns six offensive and five defensive starters from last year's squad. What that will mean for the Yellow Jackets in spring practice is open competition for some the most important positions on the field. If complacency was an issue for the offense, that could be eliminated as several candidates enter spring ball competing for the quarterback, A-back, and B-back positions in Johnson's flexbone option.

Junior quarterback Tevin Washington took over as the starting quarterback when Joshua Nesbitt broke his arm against Virginia Tech. At the time, the Jackets were 5-3 and in a position to knock off the Hokies for a huge division victory. Washington was inconsistent on the field, showing both flashes of brilliance and mind-numbingly bad decision making sometimes in the same drive. This spring he'll go head-to-head against Synjyn Days, a 6-2 sophomore from Powder Spring, GA. Days ran an option offense in high school and got to see some time running with the first team in practice near the end of last season. Days will have an opportunity, but according to Johnson the starting spot will remain with Washington for now.

"[Washington] is the starter coming in, and I think that he has earned that," Johnson explained. It is very similar to a lot of the positions, the depth chart is always fluid. He has been taking snaps. This is why I try not to get too hyped up on the freshmen. Synjyn (Days) has a lot of ability, but he has to beat Tevin out. It's Tevins' job."

Another concern for Georgia Tech's offense this spring is replacing B-back Anthony Allen, who led all rushers in 2010 with 1,316 yards. The position previously held by Allen and ACC Player of the Year Jonathan Dwyer before him will be up for grabs among four different backs. Richard Watson, Preston Lyons, Charles Perkins, and former quarterback David Sims will compete this spring for their spot in the rotation. With all that talent, you would think that the Yellow Jackets could benefit from a running back-by-committee approach. But as Doug Roberson points out, Johnson has rarely done that in his 14 seasons as a head coach.

At A-back, the leaders would appear to be Orwin Smith (516 yards, 4 touchdowns) and Roddy Jones (353 yards, 4 touchdowns). In Johnson's system, the A-back needs to have that home-run capability that demands attention from the the opposing linebackers and secondary. Both backs have shown the ability to do that at times, but with another year of experience spring will be the time to show improvement and earn that top spot in Paul Johnson's fluid depth chart.

Georgia Tech will also need to fill holes on the offensive line and hopefully Stephen Hill and Tyler Melton have developed as more consistent wide receivers. The wideouts don't need to catch a lot of balls each Saturday. But when the pigskin is tossed their way, they are expected to pull it in. Defensively Johnson is expecting to see some major improvements in the second season under the direction of defensive coordinator Al Groh, but does not seem to place any of the blame for 2010 on that side of the ball.

"If you look at the [defensive] stats from two years ago to last year, there really wasn't a lot of difference," Johnson explained before the first spring practice. "We probably had a few less turnovers last year and gave up a few less big plays. But the total yardage, points per game, all that was pretty much right in line with where we had been. You hope that in the second year (of the 3-4) there is a little more familiarity. The bottom line is winning and losing the game is determined on how many points you give up. That is the bottom line."

If the mentality has changed, as Johnson suggested, you might see a brand new Yellow Jackets squad in 2011. The expectations are not what they were a year ago in Atlanta, but that does not mean you can count Georgia Tech out of the Coastal Division race. There is a lot of buzz around Miami with Al Golden's arrival, and you can never count out Virginia Tech, but if the Yellow Jackets can eliminate the turnovers and special teams issues they should see significant improvement in the fall.

Click here for more Spring Practice Primers
Posted on: December 27, 2010 8:46 pm
 

Bowl Grades: Independence Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Air Force out-optioned Georgia Tech just enough to win the game 14-7.

Air Force


Offense: Looking at the final score, you can see that offense was at a premium in this game.  Also, while Air Force won the game, the Falcons actually didn't play strong enough to even reflect the 14 points they did get.  All you need to know is that Air Force's option attack was so successful against Georgia Tech on Monday that the Falcons threw the ball 23 times.  During the regular season they averaged 12 passes a game.  Even crazier, Air Force was more successful throwing the ball than running it, as Tim Jefferson led a nice drive out of the shotgun before halftime to get a field goal.  As for Air Force's lone touchdown, it came following a muffed punt by Georgia Tech set the Falcons up inside the 15-yard line.  In fact, punter Keil Bartholomew was Air Force's offensive MVP, as two of his punts were muffed by Tech and resulted in about 90 yards of field position and eight points.  Grade: D

Defense: While they only gave up 7 points, the Falcons defense wasn't amazing on Monday night.  They did allow Georgia Tech to rush for 320 yards, and gave up nearly 5 yards a carry.  They also allowed Tech to convert 8 of 18 third downs, and 2 of 3 fourth downs.  The key for Air Force was that they forced a few key turnovers.  On the opening drive of the second half, Tech put together an 18-play, 77 yard drive that took over eight and a half minutes off the clock.  That's when GT's Tevin Washington was stripped inside the Air Force 5-yard line and the Falcons recovered.  The second big turnover came at the end of the fourth quarter when Jon Davis intercepted a Washington pass in the final seconds to seal the victory.  Grade: B-

Coaching: At the end of the day, you can't be too critical of a coaching staff when the team gets a win, but there were a few things I felt Troy Calhoun and the Falcons could have done.  Particularly after seeing the success that the offense had out of the shotgun at the end of the first half.  The Falcons couldn't get much going on the ground all day, so I would have liked to have seen Air Force shake things up a bit on offense.  Of course, following the script did get a win.  Grade: B

Georgia Tech


Offense: Coming into the game I had doubts about Tevin Washington and how well he could lead Georgia Tech in this game in lieu of the injured Josh Nesbitt.  Well, Washington didn't play poorly at all.  Yes, there were those two back-breaking turnovers that can't be forgiven, but he also had 131 yards rushing.  Anthony Allen finished with 91 yards, and Tech ran the ball well on the day.  The problem was that yards don't count for points, and the Jackets just couldn't punch it into the end zone when it mattered.  Grade: C+

Defense: I had a lot of crow to eat when it came to Georgia Tech in this game.  Much like Washington, I had low expectations for Georgia Tech's defense in this game as well.  Seems I forgot one important thing: when you spend all season practicing against an option offense, you tend to get pretty good at stopping an option offense.  Anytime you can hold Air Force under 200 yards on the ground and force them to air it out more than they want to, you've done your job, and Tech did just that.  It's not their fault they were let down by special teams and turnovers on offense.  I'd give them an even better grade than this had they been able to force some turnovers.  Grade: A-

Coaching: I can't fault Paul Johnson or anyone on his coaching staff for this game.  They had a plan, stuck to it, and the plan worked.  They were without their starting quarterback and were in the game with a chance to win through the closing seconds.  The coaches can't be held accountable for backup punt returners and a backup quarterback turning the ball over.  Grade: A

Final Grade


I was looking forward to this game for weeks because I'm a big fan of the triple option offense, and we don't get many chances to see two teams running it face off.  The problem is that option offenses generally struggle in bowl games, and it turns out that when they go against each other, it tends to make things worse.  Seriously, the most enjoyable part of this game was that the Air Force's falcon mascot literally flew away before the game and the academy needed to form a search party to find him in downtown Shreveport.  They did find him in the fourth quarter.  They would not confirm that he was found at a casino playing blackjack.  Still, the game was close throughout, and the bird did provide entertainment, so that bumps the grade up a notch. Grade: C+
Posted on: September 27, 2010 10:38 am
Edited on: September 27, 2010 10:44 am
 

Johnson: Georgia Tech is 'Jekyll and Hyde'

Posted by Chip Patterson

Georgia Tech head coach Paul Johnson thinks his 2-2 team is having an identity crisis.

The Yellow Jackets kicked off the season with a comfortable 41-10 thrashing of South Carolina State and then followed that up with an uninspired performance in Lawrence that resulted in a 28-25 loss to Kansas.  They seemed to have turned it in around with a dominant 30-24 road victory over North Carolina, but after getting embarrassed at home by North Carolina State 45-28, it's clear that Georgia Tech is dealing with consistency issues.

Johnson addressed the situation on Sunday, blaming most notably a lack of focus, leadership, and experience on the Yellow Jackets' woes.  

Georgia Tech coach Paul Johnson described his team as having a Jekyll and Hyde personality on Sunday, a day after N.C. State defeated the Yellow Jackets 45-28 at Bobby Dodd Stadium.  Johnson said a combination of a lack of focus -- he estimated the defense blew 43 assignments and the offense nearly as many – a lack of leadership and inexperience are contributing to the uneven performance.

While Johnson said occasionally getting beat physically can't be prevented, he added that mental lapses can be.

"You can try to keep from beating yourself with dumb mistakes and not knowing what your assignment is," Johnson said. "That should be the easiest thing to fix if you want to pay attention to detail."

The issues on offense are mostly related to inexperience. At one point on Saturday, Johnson said the offensive line included a sophomore and two redshirt freshmen, including Ray Beno, who is naturally a guard but was forced because of injuries to play at center. Two sophomores played at A-back and two more at wide receiver.


The carefully planned and executed Georgia Tech schemes carried the Yellow Jackets all the way to the 2009 ACC Championship, but they also demand incredible attention to detail.  Without incredible focus, the results can be similar to the two lost fumbles, blocked punt for a touchdown, and 527 offensive yards they gave up on Saturday to the Wolfpack.  The Jackets entered the season nationally ranked and labeled a contender to repeat at ACC champion.  

With the wide-open nature of the ACC Coastal and conference play just beginning, there is still plenty of time for the Yellow Jackets to get back on track and make a run at the December 4 conference championship in Charlotte.  But before they can start thinking about defending their crown, they need to get their focus back, and do so quickly.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com