Tag:Big Ten
Posted on: January 22, 2012 4:53 pm
 

The Big Ten responds to Joe Paterno's death

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Legendary former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno died early Sunday morning at the age of 85, leaving behind a football legacy that is simply unmatched. Here are some reactions from coaches and other notable figures in the Big Ten, which Penn State joined 19 years ago.

Penn State head coach Bill O'Brien: "It is with great sadness that I am compelled to deliver this message of condolence and tribute to a great man, husband, father and someone who is more than just a coach, Joe Paterno. First, on behalf of Penn State Football, we offer our sincerest condolences to the Paterno family for their loss. We also offer our condolences to the Penn State community and, in particular, to those who wore the Penn State colors, our Nittany Lion football players and alumni. Today they lost a great man, coach, mentor and, in many cases, a father figure, and we extend our deepest sympathies. The Penn State Football program is one of college football's iconic programs because it was led by an icon in the coaching profession in Joe Paterno. There are no words to express my respect for him as a man and as a coach. To be following in his footsteps at Penn State is an honor. Our families, our football program, our university and all of college football have suffered a great loss, and we will be eternally grateful for Coach Paterno's immeasurable contributions." 

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of Joe Paterno. His passing marks a tremendous loss for Penn State, college football and for countless fans, coaches and student-athletes. Our condolences go out to the Paterno family and to the entire Penn State community."

Nebraska athletic director and former head coach Tom Osborne: "I am saddened to hear the news of Joe Paterno's passing. Joe was a genuinely good person. Whenever you recruited or played against Joe you knew how he operated and that he always stood for the right things. Of course, his longevity over time and his impact on college football is remarkable. Anybody who knew Joe feels badly about the circumstances. I suspect the emotional turmoil of the last few weeks might have played into it. We offer our condolences to his family and wish them the very best." 

Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer: "I am deeply saddened to learn about the passing of Coach Joe Paterno. He was a man who I have deep respect for as a human being, as a husband and father, as a leader and as a football coach. I was very fortunate to have been able to develop a personal relationship with him, especially over the course of the last several years, and it is something that I will always cherish.

"My prayers and thoughts go out to his wife, Sue, and to their family, and also to the family he had at Penn State University. We have lost a remarkable person and someone who affected the lives of so many people in so many positive ways. His presence will be dearly missed. His legacy as a coach, as a winner and as a champion will carry on forever."

Michigan head coach Brady Hoke: "I am certainly saddened by the news today of Coach Paterno's passing. College football has lost one of its greatest, a coaching icon. Even though I was just an assistant when our teams faced one another, I feel honored to have shared the field with Joe. His players' love for him, it shows how he touched their lives and it tells who he was as a man. He will be missed. His mark on Penn State and college football will never be forgotten. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Joe's family and friends and the entire Penn State community."

Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill: "I got home last night from recruiting and my oldest daughter said she had just heard. Fifteen minutes later, my youngest daughter at Murray State called. That's two girls from a coach's family reacting to it. That really sums up his impact. It hits home. He coached for 60 years with more than 100 players per year. Think about how many lives he touched, how many good things he has done.

"From my family to the Paterno family, our prayers go out to them. It's a sad day for football, but a good day for the man upstairs.

"I would tell people not to forget what that guy has done. To coach for 60 years in one place, that just won't ever happen again. I didn't get to coach against him. But I got to coach in the Big Ten, sit next to him at a meeting and have my picture taken with him. That's something I will never forget."

Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald: "The legacy of Joe Paterno will be long lasting — not only as a football coach and mentor, but as a family man. For 62 years, Coach Paterno poured his heart and soul into a football program and university, helping countless young men reach their dreams and goals on the football field before moving on to successful careers and lives as adults. It's hard to fathom the impact that Coach Paterno has had on college football and at Penn State. His insight and wisdom will be missed. We at Northwestern send our condolences to Sue and the Paterno family." 

Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio: "On behalf of my immediate family and the Michigan State football family, we express our deepest sympathy to Joe Paterno’s wife Sue, his five children and 17 grandchildren, as well as his extended family, the Penn State football family and the entire State College community.

"Joe dedicated his life to Penn State and college football. He had unparalleled success during his 46 seasons as the head coach at Penn State. Joe was a major player who helped revolutionize the game of college football. In his six-plus decades at Penn State, he influenced and impacted countless numbers of players and people at a championship level.

"Over the past five years, my wife and I have had the privilege of spending time with both Joe and his wife Sue. We appreciated and enjoyed the time spent at our various functions together and will forever remember him as a steward of our profession."

Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema: "Coach Paterno obviously did so many wonderful things for a number of years, not only with the success of his teams on the field but the number of lives he shaped. I hope people remember his lifetime achievements. From day one, when I joined the head coaching ranks and was fortunate enough to cross paths with him at coaches meetings and various functions, he was always very engaging and complimentary of the way we did things at Wisconsin and how we played. I enjoyed competing with him at every level. Our Badger football family sends our condolences and deepest sympathies to the Penn State community and the Paterno family."

Wisconsin athletic director and former head coach Barry Alvarez: "Today is a sad day. Joe made a difference. He impacted a lot of people. He made a difference in a community, in a college and in college football. He was truly special and an icon. For someone to continue to do what he did through different generations and for such a long period of time and be effective was amazing. I’ve considered Joe a friend and a mentor. This is sad day for college football and the Penn State community. Our thoughts and prayers go out to them and the Paterno family."

For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.
Posted on: January 22, 2012 12:25 pm
Edited on: January 22, 2012 4:43 pm
 

The Big 12 responds to Paterno's death

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Though Joe Paterno spent his entire coaching career at Penn State, his impact on the world of college football is one that has been felt all over the country. After all, Penn State didn't begin playing in the Big Ten until 1990.

That impact includes the Big 12 conference, where Paterno's presence was felt all over. Former Nebraska head coach and current athletic director Tom Osborne, who spent his coaching career at Nebraska as a member of the Big 8 and Big 12, released a statement about Paterno on Sunday.

"I am saddened to hear the news of Joe Paterno’s passing," said Osborne. "Joe was a genuinely good person. Whenever you recruited or played against Joe you knew how he operated and that he always stood for the right things. Of course, his longevity over time and his impact on college football is remarkable. Anybody who knew Joe feels badly about the circumstances. I suspect the emotional turmoil of the last few weeks might have played into it. We offer our condolences to his family and wish them the very best." 

Current Texas Tech head coach Tommy Tuberville released a statement as well.

"When you think of college football and its tradition, you can't help but picture those dark glasses, black shoes and plain uniforms that were his style and mark on Penn State University," said Tuberville. "I have had the great fortune to coach against Coach Paterno four times during my career and each time I came away from those contests with a greater understanding of the game of football. A true highlight of my career, has been a 30-year relationship with Coach and his wife Sue.

"Like many coaches, I grew up watching and learning from one of the greatest tutors and mentors of the game. I am deeply saddened to learn of his passing and wish to extend my condolences to Sue and the rest of the Paterno family." 

"I've known Coach Paterno since I started coaching," said Texas head coach Mack Brown in a statement. "Sally and I built a great relationship with him and Sue over the last 10 to 15 years, and we shared many great times. I know our lives are better because we had the opportunity to spend time with them. He was a gift to us, and when we heard the sad news today, we both openly wept, not only because college football lost a great man, but we lost a great friend. I appreciate all of the advice, the attention and the time he's given us over the years. We will miss him dearly and will always cherish the wonderful memories. College football will be left with a major void because he has done so much for our game and for Penn State. It's a very sad day, and with his passing, we have lost one of the greatest coaches our game, and all sports, will ever have. He leaves us with great stories, memories and records that may never be broken. There will never be another Joe Paterno. Our thoughts and prayers are with Sue and the family."

Even former President and Texas resident George H.W. Bush knew Paterno, as the Penn State coach was one of the men who seconded Bush's presidential nomination at the 1988 Republican National Convention. 

"I was deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Joe Paterno," the former president said in a statement released Sunday. "He was an outstanding American who was respected not only on the field of play but in life generally — and he was, without a doubt, a true icon in the world of sports. I was proud that he was a friend of mine. Barbara and I send our condolences to his devoted wife Suzanne and to his wonderful family."

During Paterno's long career as a head coach at Penn State, he faced teams currently in the Big 12 in nine different bowl games -- including four of his first five -- going 7-2. In his tenure as the head coach at Penn State, the ten schools currently in the Big 12 hired 88 new head coaches -- 86 coaches total as Bill Snyder was hired twice at Kansas State, and Don Fambrough was hired twice at Kansas --whether interim or permanent.

For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview. Like us? Tell our Facebook page.
Posted on: January 22, 2012 11:37 am
Edited on: January 22, 2012 12:25 pm
 

Bill O'Brien issues statement on Joe Paterno

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Following the death of Joe Paterno Sunday morning from lung cancer, Penn State head coach Bill O'Brien issued a statement through the university in which he calls his legendary predecessor "a great man, coach, mentor and, in many cases, a father figure."

The full statement:

"It is with great sadness that I am compelled to deliver this message of condolence and tribute to a great man, husband, father and someone who is more than just a coach, Joe Paterno. First, on behalf of Penn State Football, we offer our sincerest condolences to the Paterno family for their loss. We also offer our condolences to the Penn State community and, in particular, to those who wore the Penn State colors, our Nittany Lion football players and alumni. Today they lost a great man, coach, mentor and, in many cases, a father figure, and we extend our deepest sympathies. The Penn State Football program is one of college football's iconic programs because it was led by an icon in the coaching profession in Joe Paterno. There are no words to express my respect for him as a man and as a coach. To be following in his footsteps at Penn State is an honor. Our families, our football program, our university and all of college football have suffered a great loss, and we will be eternally grateful for Coach Paterno's immeasurable contributions." 
For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.
Posted on: January 22, 2012 11:30 am
Edited on: January 22, 2012 4:58 pm
 

Joe Paterno's former players respond

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The death of Joe Paterno on Sunday morning is one that will be felt across the entire college football landscape, but nowhere moreso than at Penn State where he spent his career building the school's program into a national program. With the news of his passing on Sunday morning, there was plenty of reaction across college football, with former players, coaches and many others talking about the legacy Paterno leaves behind.

"We grieve for the loss of Joe Paterno, a great man who made us a greater university," said Penn State president Rodney Erickson in a release. "His dedication to ensuring his players were successful both on the field and in life is legendary and his commitment to education is unmatched in college football. His life, work and generosity will be remembered always. The University plans to honor him for his many contributions and to remember his remarkable life and legacy. We are all deeply saddened." 

Some of Paterno's former players took to Twitter to express their thoughts on Sunday morning.

"Heaven hired THE best coach ever. #RIP #JoePa #WEARE" - Penn State quarterback Paul Jones

"Rest In Peace Coach. You have been my idol. You are a one of a kind man. Words cannot express all my feelings. Love you Coach." - former Penn State receiver Graham Zug

"No one wanted this news this morning.. #RIP Joe.. I'm praying I'll be able to touch lives like u did. #LongLiveTheKing" - Penn State running back Silas Redd

"#RIPJoePaterno Nothing but love and gratitude! #legendsNEVERdie" - former Penn State linebacker Nate Stupar

"R.I.P Joe..thank you for helping shape me into man I am today..will always be missed.." - former Penn State defensive back Justin King

"At a loss for words-Thankful for the impact he had on my life-Blessed to call him a friend and mentor-Joe is and always will be Penn State!" - former Penn State defensive back Adam Taliaferro

"Thank You Joe 4 taking a chance on me & helping to make me into the man I am today. i will never forget the lessons i learned from u #WeAre" - former Penn State linebacker Aaron Maybin

"At a loss for words... One of the most influential men in our nations history. By his passing PSU nations grows even stronger. Love you Joe." - former Penn State receiver Jordan Norwood
"The GREATEST... The Legend.. My Coach.. My friend.. You've meant so much to me and millions of others.. You will live on in my heart." - former Penn State quarterback Daryll Clark

"We should not be discourage by his death but encouraged by his life...it would be a blessing to impact others the way he did R.I.P Coach" - defensive tackle Devon Still

Many from the world of the NFL also responded to news of Paterno's death on Sunday.

Follow CBSSports.com's Penn State rapid reporter Jim Rodenbush for further updates out of Happy Valley.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview. Like us? Tell our Facebook page.
Posted on: January 21, 2012 8:47 pm
Edited on: January 22, 2012 1:42 am
 

Report: Paterno family weighs stopping ventilator



Posted by Adam Jacobi


UPDATE (12:25 a.m. ET): CBSSports.com issued an apology and correction for publishing an unsubstantiated report that former Penn State coach Joe Paterno had died.

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UPDATE (1:35 a.m. ET):
The Washington Post reported that Paterno's family was weighing whether to take the longtime coach off of a ventilator on Sunday.

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Penn State
student website Onward State has reported that Penn State players were notified of longtime head coach Joe Paterno's passing via email, and CBSSports.com went on this report. Paterno, 85, had been receiving chemotherapy as part of his treatment for lung cancer.

However, Paterno family spokesperson Dan McGinn told a New York Times reporter that the report of Paterno's demise is "absolutely not true," and Jay Paterno tweeted that his father "continues to fight." Onward State has since retracted their report.

Jay Paterno later tweeted he let his father know about the students gathering around his statue on campus, and that the "love and support" is "inspiring him." 

Paterno was the head coach of Penn State for 46 seasons before being fired in November as his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal came under greater scrutiny. Combined with the time he spent as an assistant, Paterno spent a total of 61 years on the Penn State sidelines. He left behind a legacy that, on the field of play, was unparalleled in Division I football. Paterno holds the all-time Division I record for football coaching wins with a 409-136-3 record, and he won two national championships while going undefeated in five different seasons.

[STATS: JoePa's lifetime coaching record]

Under Paterno, Penn State was a perennial powerhouse, known for decades as "Linebacker U" for its propensity to develop All-American linebackers. Paterno coached such great linebackers as Dennis Onkotz, Jack Ham, Shane Conlan, LaVar Arrington, Paul Posluszny, Dan Connor, and Sean Lee, along with many others.

Additionally, running back John Cappelletti won the Heisman Trophy in 1973 under Paterno, and Cappelletti was one of seven Penn State players to win the Maxwell Award for most outstanding college football player. All in all, 68 players were named first-team All-American by at least one of the major news services under Paterno; 13 of those players were two-year winners.

Paterno's longtime defensive coordinator and the architect of the defensive schemes that came to typify Penn State football was Jerry Sandusky, who's now more well-known for the allegations of underaged sexual abuse against him made by men who were involved in Sandusky's charity, The Second Mile, as boys. Sandusky is still awaiting trial for those allegations, and he pled not guilty to the charges in December 2011.

In an interview with the Washington Post released just a week ago, Paterno expressed remorse for not having done more to stop Sandusky's alleged crimes, and he also said he was "just sick about" the situation. Investigators did not bring charges against Paterno, and instead mentioned that he had fulfilled his legal obligations by notifying his superiors about an alleged assault when he was first notified in 2002.

After Paterno was fired in 2011, Penn State named Tom Bradley -- who, coincidentally, was Sandusky's replacement at defensive coordinator -- interim head coach. Bradley went 1-3, including a loss to Houston in the TicketCity Bowl, and was not retained as a coach when Penn State hired Bill O'Brien in January.

Paterno was well known for encouraging his players to excel in the classroom and earn their undergraduate degrees at Penn State, and his name will live on at Penn State. Paterno and his wife Sue were major financial supporters of Penn State University, as they donated millions of dollars for the Paterno Library on campus, and Paterno helped establish the Paterno Liberal Arts Undergraduate Fellows Program.
Posted on: January 21, 2012 6:10 pm
Edited on: January 21, 2012 7:32 pm
 

Reports: Joe Paterno 'near death,' off respirator

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Joe Paterno, the man who for decades was synonymous with the powerhouse Penn State football program, is reportedly in declining health. Onward State, the student-run Penn State website, reported on Saturday that Paterno had been taken off his respirator that morning, according to a source close to the family. Further, a report by Tom McAndrew of Blue White Illustrated indicates that Paterno's extended family has been summoned to the hospital.

If those reports are true, Paterno likely has, at best, a matter of days to live. It may be even shorter than that, as Mike Sisak of the Citizens' Voice in Wilkes-Barre is reporting that Paterno is "near death."

"Over the last few days Joe Paterno has experienced further health complications," said Paterno family spokesman Dan McGinn. "His doctors have now characterized his status as serious. His family will have no comment on the situation and asks that their privacy be respected during this difficult time."

It was only a week ago that Paterno gave his first interview since his November firing at the height of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. In it, interviewer Sally Jenkins noted that Paterno was wheelchair-bound, wearing a wig, and reduced to whispers due to his battle with lung cancer. Further, Paterno is 85, and most people that age aren't able to begin and win a fight with a disease like lung cancer. Still, Jenkins also noted that Paterno remained sharp, and his familiar tone and personality are evident in the interview snippets that were posted online.

CBSSports.com will provide more details as they become available, as this is a developing situation.
Posted on: January 20, 2012 6:35 pm
Edited on: January 20, 2012 6:36 pm
 

PICTURES: Minnesota unveils new uniforms

Posted by Adam Jacobi

It's the offseason, and for teams coming off disappointing seasons, that means it's time to generate renewed excitement about the program in any way possible. One great way to do that? New uniforms! And with that, Minnesota unveiled a bevy of uniform combinations on Friday afternoon to go along with its new matte maroon helmet:

And with that, here are the new uniforms (all modeled without helmets on, because... okay?), courtesy of the Minnesota athletic department:

From a distance, the new uniforms are pretty drab. And that's a good thing! In football, the flashier aspects of a uniform belong on a helmet, which are more suited for smaller flourishes and details -- like, say, the SKI-U-MAH on the back of the Minnesota hats. On a uniform, though, the primary necessity is legible numbers, and Minnesota's are pretty solid in that respect (though why is it so hard for uniform manufacturers to come up with a "5" that doesn't look like an accident?).

Put it another way: You know what happens when uniforms aren't boring? They end up looking like this.

Still, being that this is Nike we're talking about, there are some interesting details up close. From the official news release:

Brick patterns and texture are also prominent in some of the design elements. Jersey numbering and lettering on the white and gold jerseys will be printed with a brick pattern, which was taken directly from one of the walls of Memorial Stadium, which is on display at the McNamara Alumni Center.

So that's neat.

So what do you think? Yea? Nay? Neigh? (If you vote neigh, you are a horse, get off the internet you horse, this is for people) 

Posted on: January 20, 2012 4:34 pm
Edited on: January 30, 2012 2:31 pm
 

A first look at 2012's returning starters

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's never, ever too early to talk about the next college football season once the previous one has passed. But it's a lot less too early once the deadline for NFL Draft declarations has passed and teams can enjoy an accurate -- or at least semi-accurate -- gauge of what their returning talent will look like next season.

Thanks to data-cruncher Phil Steele, we can enjoy that same semi-accurate gauge. As he does every January -- among the teams predicted for big things at this time last year were Michigan, Alabama and Vanderbilt -- Steele has released a comprehensive list of FBS returning starters for 2012, ranking each team 1-123. Yes, 123, thanks to the arrivals of UT-San Antonio, Texas State and UMass; Larry Coker's UTSA Roadrunners even top the list with 23 total returning starters (11 offensive, 10 defensive, and both specialists) as they ready for their first WAC season.

But of course, UTSA has its work cut out for it to make an impact, no matter how experienced its players might be. Among programs college football fans are more familiar with, here's the numbers and teams from Steele's data that stand out:

  • Sharing the lead amongst all BCS programs are Texas Tech and Tennessee with 20 starters each, including quarterbacks Seth Doege and Tyler Bray, respectively. If Red Raider and Volunteer third-year coaches Tommy Tuberville and Derek Dooley can't turn that kind of experience into a better year 3 than their collective Year 2's, neither one should be surprised if they don't receive a Year 4.
  • Never say never with Chris Petersen still around, but this looks like the season Boise State's incredible run of dominance and top-10 finishes comes to a halt. The Broncos rank dead-last, rock-bottom, with just 6 starters coming back--3 offensive 2 defensive, and (infamous) kicker Dan Goodale. (Then again, in the newly TCU-less Mountain West, will anyone stop them regardless? The league leader in returning starters is Colorado State, with no other MWC program ranked higher than Fresno State at 29th.)
  • It's possible Badger fans will rue their back-to-back failures at the Rose Bowl even more than they do already; with just 10 returning starters, Wisconsin ranks at the bottom of the Big Ten and 116th overall. Big Ten fans should instead gear up now for an even-more-critical Ohio State-Michigan game than usual; the Buckeyes are second in the league behind Indiana with 18 starters, and the Wolverines are tied with Nebraska for third with 16.
  • The Vols, Auburn, Florida and Vanderbilt top the SEC list -- with 18 starters or more, all rank among the nation's 19 most experienced teams -- which means the league could see a more topsy-turvy season than usual; despite their cavalcade of young talent LSU returns just 5 defensive starters, national champions Alabama just 4. Despite major losses on the offensive line, Georgia looks poised to field the conference's best defense, with nine starters coming back for a unit already ranked fifth in the FBS.
  • Why is USC getting so much early preseason love? Pretty simple: of the 10 teams listed in Bruce Feldman's early-bird top 10, the Trojans are one of just two to have as many as 17 returning starters. The other is Oklahoma, and since the Sooners finished the year getting chewed up and spit out by Oklahoma State while the Trojans were busy upsetting Oregon in Eugene and annihilating UCLA, it's not hard to see why voters might go for the former.
  • Poor Al Golden: not only is his Miami team still laboring under the weight of the Nevin Shapiro allegations, not only do they rank 96th nationally and tie for next-to-last in the ACC with 12 returning starters, but according to Steele's data the Hurricanes are -- amazingly -- the only ACC team to not return its starting quarterback for next season. 
  • Gus Malzahn is going to be one of the FBS's most closely watched mid-major head coaches after his move from Auburn, and with six returning starters including QB Ryan Aplin on offense, the Red Wolves should be fine on that side of the ball. But with just three starters back on defense, ASU ranks 116th overall and last in the Sun Belt in total starters returning. Opposite Malzahn's punishing up-tempo attack, we'd like to place an early wager on the Red Wolves as one the nation's statistically weakest D's in 2012 ... and on Malzahn needing at least two years to return ASU to last year's championship perch.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview. Like us? Tell our Facebook page.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com