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Tag:Duke
Posted on: May 23, 2011 2:40 pm
 

You win, Kyle Singler

Posted by Matt Norlander

The first iteration of Kyle Singler's trick-shot-making abilities came at the beginning of last season. It was an amazing video, but I took a few shots at Singler then because it seemed to be too inspired by Mark Titus, college basketball's originator of comedic trick-shot videos.

Turns out Singler's serious about his skills. He unleashed his Gets Buckets 2.0 video recently, and it's particularly ridiculous. This is now the standard-bearer for all trick-shot videos. And I say this as someone who's pretty sick of these things as it is. Teenagers across America are wasting their lives compiling hours upon hours of tape, afternoon after afternoon, in hopes to become the next one-day Internet sensation.

Put the iPhones and cameras down, kids. Singler just put you all to sleep. The pool shot is my favorite, even if the Chapel chuck makes the video.



(H/T, Dagger)
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: May 20, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Perry Ellis taking time with recruiting process



Posted by Jeff Borzello

Wichita Heights (Kan.) has won three consecutive state championships and currently own a 44-game winning streak.

It’s scary to think they could be even better next year given the way Perry Ellis is improving.

“Perry is getting stronger,” said his mother, Fonda. “His shooting has really improved, he is more explosive and more confident.”

Ellis is a 6-foot-8 forward who is ranked among the top-20 players in his class by most services. He can score in a variety of ways, with his back to the basket or in the mid-range while facing up. Ellis runs the floor effectively and knows how to finish at the rim.

He was receiving interest and offers from nearly every big-time school, but trimmed his list in early December. Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Memphis, Oklahoma and Wichita State made the finalists for Ellis, who has since heard from Minnesota and Duke.

“I would say that Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky and Wichita State have all shown the most [interest] this spring,” Fonda Ellis said. “We received a call from Duke’s new assistant Jeff Capel on Tuesday.”

Ellis said the perseverance and time each school put in has made them attractive to her son.

“They are all great programs and they all have been recruiting him for a while,” she said. “He has built strong relationships with most of the coaches since eighth and ninth grade.”

Perry visited Wichita State this week, but does not plan to make any other visits until the fall. He will be on the AAU circuit this spring and summer with the Kansas Pray and Play Players.

His mother said there are no favorites yet, but he is looking for a place where he will be “totally comfortable.”

“He is really not ready to do that yet,” Ellis said in terms of leaning one way or another. “He wants to see what happens this summer first.

“He would like to take his official visits this fall and hopefully commit or sign by early signing [period].”

By that time, Wichita Heights will be on the verge of starting a run at a fourth straight state title – led by Ellis, of course.

Photo: MaxPreps

Posted on: May 16, 2011 3:04 pm
Edited on: May 16, 2011 3:07 pm
 

Duke apparently can't spell P.J. Hairston

Posted by Jeff Borzello

North Carolina and Duke have a lot of things in common. They are both national basketball powers in the ACC, coached by legendary coaches and located within eight miles of each other on Tobacco Road.

According to incoming North Carolina freshman P.J. Hairston, though, one thing separated the two schools during his recruitment.

One school was able to spell his name correctly. One, well, wasn’t.

“The thing about Duke was, every time they sent me a letter, they wouldn’t spell my name right,” Hairston told Jason Wolf of the Greensboro News-Record. “They would have ‘T.J. Harrison’ or something like that.”

Not surprisingly, the 6-foot-4 Hargrave Military Academy (Va.) prospect from Greensboro, N.C. chose the lighter shade of blue when it came time to make a college decision.

“I’m like, ‘OK. How can I go here? You can’t even spell my name right,’” Hairston said about Duke. “It’s only two letters and HAIR and STON. I’m trying to figure out how that’s so hard.”

Of course, there were other things that factored into Hairston’s decision, but I can’t imagine it helped Duke’s case that they misspelled his name more than once.

It’s a good cautionary tale for college programs: when recruiting a top-25 prospect, spell his name right.

Photo: Kelly Kline/NIKE

Category: NCAAB
Posted on: May 12, 2011 10:33 pm
Edited on: May 13, 2011 4:29 pm
 

DeAndre Daniels still the big prize for 2011

Posted by Matt Jones


Every year, there is one elite high school basketball basketball player whose recruiting process turns into an exhausting, never-ending circus that becomes associated with the kid forever. Last year, it was Terrence Jones, who held a press conference to announce he would attend Washington, only to call John Calipari in tears immediately thereafter. Jones later changed his commitment to Kentucky, but his inability to make a decision in the first instance has given him the label of indecisiveness that has stuck with him ever since. Such recruitments stick with even the best of kids as they make a process that others seem to be able to complete at a normal pace, extend into perpetuity. 


This year's version is DeAndre Daniels, an athletic small forward from the IMG Academy in Florida, who is now entering (we hope) the final moments of his college selection process. For those who have followed Daniels's high school career, the ride has been long and bumpy. Daniels seemed to initially have his process finished in 2009, when he made an early commitment to Rick Barnes and Texas. At that point, Daniels was considered an elite prospect and throughout most of his high school career, his future as an integral part of the Longhorn program seemed certain.


But then, early in his senior season at IMG, Daniels reopened his recruiting process in order to let all of the top programs in America give their sales pitches. Two of the elites, Kentucky and Kansas, attempted to convince Daniels that he should graduate from IMG early and potentially enroll in college during the second semester of the 2010-2011 season.  Daniels considered both options, but ultimately decided to remain at IMG and be recruited throughout the course of the school year. Other top programs such as Duke and Florida then made contact, and for a time period, Daniels was like the final attractive girl sitting at the bar before last call...pursued by all with alone (or holding an open scholarship) with an extra sense of desperation because of the lack of other candidates.


Now we are just a few short days away from the end of the Spring signing period and Daniels still has yet to make a decision. May 18th is the final day in which a player can sign a Letter of Intent and nearly all of the few remaining elite players are planning on picking a school by that deadline. But there is no requirement that a player sign a Letter of Intent to play college basketball and Daniels has given no indication that he is planning on signing or announcing by the deadline.


In fact, Daniels has given recruiting observers little indication of any of his plans at this point. For most of the past month, it had been assumed that Coach K was working his blue devil magic on Daniels and had him headed towards Durham to join an already stacked roster for next season. But then today, Jeff Goodman reported that Duke was no longer an option for Daniels as speculation about potential academic hurdles erased the hastily arranged marriage. Kentucky has basically stopped recruiting Daniels this spring, leading most to assume that Kansas and Texas are the two favorites for his services. Whether Daniels picks either of those schools, signs a Letter of Intent or simply shocks everyone by choosing a path that no one has yet predicted, remains to be seen. Daniels final decision is (along with the reopening on Thursday of former Maryland commitment Nick Faust's recruitment) the final major story of the 2011 recruiting class and will go a long way in deciding the fortunes and playing time of a number of major college basketball programs next season.


For my purposes, I am openly pulling for Daniels to close his bizarre recruiting path by choosing to become a Longhorn. It would be the height of absurdity if two years after his original commitment and following six months of heated pursuit by nearly all of college basketball's elite programs and coaches, Daniels ended up right back where he started, playing for Rick Barnes at Texas. Every recruiting class needs a player whose path is so ridiculous that it becomes memorable. Deandre Daniels is well suited to become just that player.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: May 10, 2011 2:55 pm
Edited on: May 10, 2011 6:37 pm
 

Capel follows familiar path back to basketball

Posted by Eric Angevine

Will it be strange for Jeff Capel to go back to taking orders after nine years of calling his own shots, first at VCU and then at Oklahoma?

It might be, but then again, he'll be listening to his mentor, Mike Krzyzewski, the man who coached him when he was wearing the Blue Devil uniform. Taking pointers from a legend probably doesn't sting too much. Regardless of how he feels about it, Capel is not alone. Deposed head coaches often begin their comebacks as assistants; there are plenty of examples in the sport today.

One of the more prominent return-to-the-sidelines stories of the past season involved Steve Lavin's decision to return from broadcasting. Not content to put an end to his own time away from coaching, Lavin also talked his mentor, legendary former Purdue coach Gene Keady, out of retirement. Keady's return is certainly not predicated on the notion of getting back to head coaching - it comes across as almost a favor to Lavin, who has been criticized for a perceived lack of strategic knowledge of the game. Keady seemingly serves in that capacity, as well as playing senior advisor and best buddy to his former protege.

Capel almost certainly expects to end up back in charge of a program again, though it won't likely be Duke. With Chris Collins and Wojo ahead of him, and Coach K not looking to depart any time soon, it's much more likely that some school out there will put him back in charge within the next couple of seasons, once the stink of his departure from Oklahoma has a chance to die down.

It's tough to say whether Capel is making the right move, but it's the best move available to him right now. He doesn't seem like the TV analyst type, with his permanent glower in place. Looking at the other former head coaches in the ACC, it's obvious that attempting to get back into the limelight by taking a second or third seat on the bench is a strategy that yields mixed results.

Look at North Carolina. After leaving Roy Williams' Kansas staff for two years as head man at Tulsa and another five in charge of Florida State, Steve Robinson came back to Williams' side in 2002. In seven years as a Tar Heels assistant, the coaching carousel has never come back around for Robinson, who is nevertheless known as one of the game's top recruiters.

Just down the road in Raleigh, new head coach Mark Gottfried has shored up his staff with a couple of guys who are likely on different paths. Orlando Early spent five seasons as head coach at Louisiana-Monroe, going 60-92 in the Sun Belt. He spent one season as an assistant at South Carolina after that before Gottfried came calling. Bobby Lutz, on the other hand, had a pretty nice 218-158 record in 12 years at UNC-Charlotte, and was Early's boss for much of that time. Many feel Lutz was unjustly let go by Charlotte, and expect him to find another head job sooner rather than later.

The most experienced former head coach on an ACC roster might come as a surprise, however. Look to Charlottesville, where the youthful Tony Bennett was able to lure Ritchie McKay to be his right-hand man. McKay has a long history of short hops, spending two years each at Portland State, Colorado State and Oregon State before taking a rather leisurely five years at New Mexico. Then it was two years at Liberty (he couldn't follow Seth Curry out the door fast enough) before he joined Bennett. McKay only made the NCAA tournament once in all those years, and his 204-186 overall record seems pretty indicative of what he's capable of. Still, McKay is only 46, so a decent mid-major job might yet again tempt him into the coach's box somewhere else.

Even Boston College is in on the act. Former Cornell coach Steve Donahue snapped up Joe Jones, who spent seven years rowing against the tide at Columbia before his 86-108 record did him in.

Capel is known as a good recruiter. His inability to keep some of his star players in line thereafter was a big part of what led him to this pretty pass. If he learns how to overcome that weakness under Coach K's tutelage, there might yet be another program willing to take a chance on the fiery young coach. He's still 36, has a reasonable 61 percent winning mark, and even served an undefeated stint as the head coach of the FIBA U18 team for USA Basketball last year.

While his exit from Oklahoma was hardly a positive move, the future may yet be very bright for Jeff Capel.

Photo: US Presswire

Posted on: April 25, 2011 2:37 pm
 

Which schools are most overvalued in NBA draft?



Posted by Matt Jones


This is not a new story, but with the NBA draft deadline having just passed and little happening in the post-Easter weekend sports world, I found it interesting. Two years ago, the blog 82games.com sought to determine which schools were most overvalued and undervalued by the NBA in the draft process. The process for making the determination was by no means scientific. The author utilized only the past 20 years and by starting in 2009, the older players' careers and their longer careers were ultimately given more weight. Still, the methodology, while not perfect, was adequate for determining whether players from certain schools are more consistently over or under valued by NBA teams. 

The blog compared a players' career per-game average in points/rebounds/assists versus the average totals for other players who were also picked in the same slot in those 20 NBA drafts. A per-game comparison (as opposed to a per-minute method) is not a good way to evaluate an individual player, but it is a decent method for an enterprise such as this, which is seeking to make a macro judgment about a larger pool of players. After determining the difference from the average person selected at the same pick, a particular player would be categorized as either a star, role player, etc and then rated versus the other colleges. Only schools with five or more players were ranked in the total school comparison.

Amongst all teams, these ten schools were ranked as the most consistently undervalued by NBA teams (number of NBA picks during selected period in parentheses):

1. Wake Forest  (7)

2. UTEP   (5)

3. Marquette (7)

4. Xavier  (8)

5. Clemson (6)

6. Kentucky (15)

7. Alabama (13)

8. Depaul (6)

9. Purdue (6)

10. Pittsburgh (6)


In a bit of a surprise, Wake Forest took the top spot, thanks in large part to the three superstars it has produced, Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Josh Howard (who is a superstar relative to his No. 29 overall draft status). Spots 2 and 3 are taken by UTEP and Marquette, both of which are helped in large part by having produced Tim Hardaway and Dwayne Wade. What is most striking is that, with the exception of Kentucky, none of the top 10 are traditional powerhouse schools, showcasing that the NBA is very likely to undervalue many second-tier programs, just as most fans do as well.

Here is the list of the most overvalued programs in the NBA draft:

1. Louisville (11)

2. Vanderbilt (5)

3. Colorado (5)

4. Gonzaga (5)

5. Indiana (13)

6. Mississippi State (6)

7. NC State (9)

8. Missouri (9)

9. Iowa  (10)

10. Texas Tech (5)


During the 20 year period studied, Louisville had the most players consistently overvalued by the NBA. Pervis Ellison, Samaki Walker, Reece Gaines, Felton Spencer and Cliff Rozier were all picked in the lottery during this period and none averaged more points than the average player picked at their position. Also disappointing is Indiana, which produced few top players during the end of the Bob Knight era and has seen its overall status as a program drop during the same period.

Finally, the blog ranked the top powerhouse programs based upon NBA draft performance as well. Because a school that produces only five players in 20 years can have its status changed by one high profile star or bust (see Marquette with Wade or Gonzaga with Adam Morrison), the higher sample size makes this a bit of a better comparison. Here was the ranking of top programs with 15 or more players selected during the 20 year period:


1. Kentucky (15)

2. Michigan  (16)

3. Connecticut  (21)

4. Arizona  (28)

5. UCLA  (26)

6. Syracuse (15)

7. Georgia Tech (19)

8. Michigan State (16)

9. North Carolina (22)

10. Maryland (16)

11. Texas (16)

12. Kansas (22)

13. Duke (28)


Amongst the programs with the most picks in the draft, Kentucky players have been the most consistently undervalued. The production by players such as Jamaal Magloire, Tayshaun Prince, Chuck Hayes and Rajon Rondo from low draft spots, places Kentucky at the top of the list. The biggest surprise of the list (with the exception of Georgia Tech having 19 players drafted during that period) is the school at the bottom of the list, Duke. The Blue Devils are the most overvalued group of players in the NBA draft by a substantial margin, with the greatest number of players performing below the average player at their position. Also interestingly, North Carolina's players are valued exactly at the correct point according to the scale. With the 22 players the Tar Heels have produced for the NBA during that period, their final NBA production has been exactly average for any player picked at their positions.

What does all this mean? Probably not much. Potentially NBA teams should consider Brandon Knight or Deandre Liggins a few picks higher or Kyrie Irving a couple of picks lower. But probably what it does mostly is give college basketball fans something to argue about during the offseason. And that in and of itself is productive.
Posted on: April 25, 2011 2:37 pm
 

Which schools are most overvalued in NBA draft?



Posted by Matt Jones


This is not a new story, but with the NBA draft deadline having just passed and little happening in the post-Easter weekend sports world, I found it interesting. Two years ago, the blog 82games.com sought to determine which schools were most overvalued and undervalued by the NBA in the draft process. The process for making the determination was by no means scientific. The author utilized only the past 20 years and by starting in 2009, the older players' careers and their longer careers were ultimately given more weight. Still, the methodology, while not perfect, was adequate for determining whether players from certain schools are more consistently over or under valued by NBA teams. 

The blog compared a players' career per-game average in points/rebounds/assists versus the average totals for other players who were also picked in the same slot in those 20 NBA drafts. A per-game comparison (as opposed to a per-minute method) is not a good way to evaluate an individual player, but it is a decent method for an enterprise such as this, which is seeking to make a macro judgment about a larger pool of players. After determining the difference from the average person selected at the same pick, a particular player would be categorized as either a star, role player, etc and then rated versus the other colleges. Only schools with five or more players were ranked in the total school comparison.

Amongst all teams, these ten schools were ranked as the most consistently undervalued by NBA teams (number of NBA picks during selected period in parentheses):

1. Wake Forest  (7)

2. UTEP   (5)

3. Marquette (7)

4. Xavier  (8)

5. Clemson (6)

6. Kentucky (15)

7. Alabama (13)

8. Depaul (6)

9. Purdue (6)

10. Pittsburgh (6)


In a bit of a surprise, Wake Forest took the top spot, thanks in large part to the three superstars it has produced, Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Josh Howard (who is a superstar relative to his No. 29 overall draft status). Spots 2 and 3 are taken by UTEP and Marquette, both of which are helped in large part by having produced Tim Hardaway and Dwayne Wade. What is most striking is that, with the exception of Kentucky, none of the top 10 are traditional powerhouse schools, showcasing that the NBA is very likely to undervalue many second-tier programs, just as most fans do as well.

Here is the list of the most overvalued programs in the NBA draft:

1. Louisville (11)

2. Vanderbilt (5)

3. Colorado (5)

4. Gonzaga (5)

5. Indiana (13)

6. Mississippi State (6)

7. NC State (9)

8. Missouri (9)

9. Iowa  (10)

10. Texas Tech (5)


During the 20 year period studied, Louisville had the most players consistently overvalued by the NBA. Pervis Ellison, Samaki Walker, Reece Gaines, Felton Spencer and Cliff Rozier were all picked in the lottery during this period and none averaged more points than the average player picked at their position. Also disappointing is Indiana, which produced few top players during the end of the Bob Knight era and has seen its overall status as a program drop during the same period.

Finally, the blog ranked the top powerhouse programs based upon NBA draft performance as well. Because a school that produces only five players in 20 years can have its status changed by one high profile star or bust (see Marquette with Wade or Gonzaga with Adam Morrison), the higher sample size makes this a bit of a better comparison. Here was the ranking of top programs with 15 or more players selected during the 20 year period:


1. Kentucky (15)

2. Michigan  (16)

3. Connecticut  (21)

4. Arizona  (28)

5. UCLA  (26)

6. Syracuse (15)

7. Georgia Tech (19)

8. Michigan State (16)

9. North Carolina (22)

10. Maryland (16)

11. Texas (16)

12. Kansas (22)

13. Duke (28)


Amongst the programs with the most picks in the draft, Kentucky players have been the most consistently undervalued. The production by players such as Jamaal Magloire, Tayshaun Prince, Chuck Hayes and Rajon Rondo from low draft spots, places Kentucky at the top of the list. The biggest surprise of the list (with the exception of Georgia Tech having 19 players drafted during that period) is the school at the bottom of the list, Duke. The Blue Devils are the most overvalued group of players in the NBA draft by a substantial margin, with the greatest number of players performing below the average player at their position. Also interestingly, North Carolina's players are valued exactly at the correct point according to the scale. With the 22 players the Tar Heels have produced for the NBA during that period, their final NBA production has been exactly average for any player picked at their positions.

What does all this mean? Probably not much. Potentially NBA teams should consider Brandon Knight or Deandre Liggins a few picks higher or Kyrie Irving a couple of picks lower. But probably what it does mostly is give college basketball fans something to argue about during the offseason. And that in and of itself is productive.
Posted on: April 21, 2011 1:18 pm
 

Too soon? A look at next season's holiday games



Posted by Eric Angevine

Our season just ended, but it's never too soon to start thinking about what will happen next. Certainly not for the organizers of early season tournaments, those resume-building events that often give us meaningful matchups. Recall that UConn and Kentucky met on Maui on November 24, 2010 in a preview of an eventual Final Four game. These early battles usually play out in front of few specatators, but they get a lot of scrutiny come Selection Sunday.

So, with that in mind, let's look at some of the evolving fields that organizers are putting together. Not all participants are settled as of right now, and personnel may change radically over the next month or so, but you can keep track of any changes by visiting the CBSSports.com early season tournament guide.

Some highlights:

Coaches vs. Cancer, Nov. 7-11 and 17-18: The automatic qualifiers -- meaning the four power conference teams that advance even if they lose in the first round -- are set. Arizona will be trying to carry over some momentum without Derrick Williams, and they'll be thrown into a field that includes Mississippi State, St. John's and Texas A&M. MSU was an absolute shambles last season, so it will be interesting to see if that's a thing of the past, or if Rick Stansbury is in a downward spiral in Starkville. SJU will be looking to prove that this season's resurgence was no fluke, and A&M has just been consistently good under Mark Turgeon.

Maui Invitational, Nov. 21-23: You don't need my persuasive arguments to see the value in this field. Duke, Kansas, Memphis, Michigan, Tennessee, UCLA, Georgetown and, of course, plucky Chaminade. One thing that jumps out, however, is Michigan getting another shot at one or more of the programs they faced during their growing season last year. Obviously, this will be quite the melee of blue-blood programs.

Diamond Head Classic, Dec. 22-25 & 25: This one isn't as loaded as the first two we looked at, but it has some intriguing possibilities. There are a couple of big-name programs looking for early statement games in Clemson and Kansas State, plus the always-intriguing mid-majors UTEP and Xavier.

Those three tourneys represent the best fields to date. There are several interesting teams in weak fields elsewhere, such as Marquette showing up in the Paradise Jam, experienced Notre Dame in a field of transitioning programs in the CBE Classic and defending national champs UConn slumming it in the amusingly-named Battle 4 Atlantis. The Puerto Rico Tip-Off throws Purdue in with a whole slew of NIT teams like Alabama, Colorado and Wichita State. Both VCU and Richmond show up as unexpected heavy-hitters in off-off-Broadway productions, as well.

These early tournaments are often just something to have on in the background while digesting heavy holiday meals and conversing dutifully with relatives, but there's usually a little intrigue if you scratch past the surface. There will be new coaches, new players and, best of all, a new basketball season coming, just as the weather starts to turn chilly again this year.

Photo: US Presswire
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com