Tag:Derrick Rose
Posted on: November 5, 2011 8:50 am
Edited on: November 5, 2011 11:36 am

Boatright's eligibility tied to D-Rose's brother

By Gary Parrish

Is Derrick Rose's older brother part of another NCAA investigation?

Yes, according to a Connecticut newspaper.

The Danbury News-Times reported Saturday that Ryan Boatright's eligibility at Connecticut is under review because of a plane ticket once purchased for the freshman point guard by Reggie Rose, brother of NBA Most Valuable Player Derrick Rose. Boatright spent his high school years playing summer basketball for the D-Rose All-Stars. Reggie Rose coaches the D-Rose All-Stars.

CBSSports.com's attempt to reach Reggie Rose for comment early Saturday was unsuccessful.

Connecticut announced Wednesday that Boatright, a freshman from Illinois, would be held out of games until the NCAA concluded a review of his eligibility, but the school offered no further details at the time. The News-Times reported Saturday that Boatright could be suspended for three to six games once the NCAA's review concludes.

This isn't the first time Reggie Rose and improper travel have been a part of an investigation. The NCAA found that Reggie Rose incurred $2,260 worth of unpaid expenses while traveling with the Memphis basketball team during the 2007-08 season. That season was later vacated once Derrick Rose's SAT score was invalidated.

Posted on: October 27, 2011 9:49 am
Edited on: October 27, 2011 10:07 am

This is a system problem, not a Beasley problem

By Gary Parrish

The text message came early Thursday from a longtime college basketball coach.

Here's what it said:

"We have kids going to college who don't want to go to college. If the NBA doesn't want them, then the D-League should be set up for them. But the sad fact is that these kids are getting paid more money to go to college for a year than to play in the D-League."

The text was an obvious reaction to the Washington Post's story on Michael Beasley's lawsuit against his former summer coach (Curtis Malone) and agent (Joel Bell) that has already muddied the reputations of the summer coach and agent and seems likely of vacating Beasley's one season at Kansas State. As my colleague Matt Norlander pointed out, Beasley and his mother have basically acknowledged receiving extra benefits throughout high school and college. Assuming the NCAA follows up, it's hard to imagine a scenario that doesn't involve the NBA veteran being ruled retroactively ineligible just like former Memphis star Derrick Rose was ruled retroactively ineligible and former USC star O.J. Mayo was ruled retroactively ineligible. In other words, the top three picks from the 2008 NBA Draft -- each of whom was a one-and-done prospect -- will eventually be wiped from the official record books. They are celebrated recruits turned permanent stains.

That, my friends, is a system problem.

And it should be noted that the NCAA didn't catch any of them.

The SAT security testing agency caught Rose cheating on his SAT, Yahoo! Sports exposed Mayo, and Beasley basically outed himself in a lawsuit that highlights the underbelly of high-major recruiting. The NCAA initially cleared them all to compete as freshmen, somebody else later discovered a problem, and now Memphis and USC have 2007-08 seasons that don't count, and Kansas State will join them in time. These are messy situations but hardly surprises because the system in place creates such issues.

Elite basketball prospects are commodities well before they're even recruitable student-athletes according to NCAA rules, meaning agents get their fingers in them long before college coaches. They are compromised early on and in many cases have no desire or real need to attend college. But the NBA's one-and-done rule essentially forces them to campus where they have to pretend to be amateurs, and, let's be honest, they're almost never amateurs by the NCAA's definition. Still, there's lots of pressure on college coaches to enroll the best prospects, and so they do even when they know it's risky. Then the coaches, agents, players and, some would say, the NCAA are all left to cross their fingers and hope nobody gets caught because part of the allure of college basketball is the idea that these are just college kids playing for the love of the school.

But it's all horsesh-t.

Complete and total horsesh-t.

The top three picks of the 2008 NBA Draft are proof.

We'll continue to add names to the list until the system is overhauled.

Posted on: October 7, 2011 1:31 am
Edited on: October 7, 2011 10:19 am

Memphians targeting D-Rose is dumb, shortsighted

By Gary Parrish

Three Memphis-area attorneys who double as University of Memphis boosters got so angry about John Calipari leaving their basketball program on probation that they last year threatened to sue Calipari, one-and-done star Derrick Rose and athletic director R.C. Johnson on behalf of unnamed season-ticket holders, according to reports late Thursday from The Commercial Appeal's Kyle Veazey and Geoff Calkins.

Nevermind that, according to university counsel Sheri Lipman, the complaint “had all sorts of holes in it." And nevermind that, according to common sense, any lawsuit would've almost certainly been dismissed. Calipari, Rose and Johnson still each opted to settle out of court. Calipari and Rose agreed to pay the attorneys a total of $100,000, and Calipari also agreed to donate the bonus he received for taking Memphis to the title game of the 2008 NCAA Tournament back to the school's Tiger Scholarship Fund. Johnson agreed to return the bonus he received that year, too.

Calipari's donation is estimated at $232,000 while Johnson is expected to repay a little more than $71,000.

So it's a victory for Memphis fans, I guess.

Season tips Nov. 7
They hit Calipari in the pocketbook.

That must've been fun.

But why did these attorneys think it was wise to threaten to sue the school's most famous alum?

Because that's not wise.

That's just stupid.

Say what you want about Rose, but he's merely a pawn in this game, a product of the system, a kid most believe only played at Memphis because somebody else took his SAT, a kid I believe should've never been essentially forced to play college basketball in the first place. Let's be honest: Rose didn't belong at a university any more than I belong in the NBA, and I mean that in the most respectful of ways. He's a basketball player, plain and simple, and it was pretty clear for years before Rose ever enrolled at Memphis that he'd eventually make millions of dollars slashing to the rim.

And it was very clear in March 2010 when three attorneys threatened to sue him.

So, again, who thought it was wise to do that?

Rose, the NBA's reigning Most Valuable Player, will make hundreds of millions of dollars in his career, and all Memphis had to do to benefit from that was stay on good terms with the Chicago Bulls point guard. Remember how Carmelo Anthony donated $3 million to Syracuse to help build a practice facility named in his honor? It's reasonable to think Rose, whose next contract will likely be worth more than he could ever spend, might've done something similar for Memphis someday. But why would he now? Why would he donate big money to Memphis after Martin Zummach, a past president of the Memphis alumni association, threatened to sue him during his second season in the NBA?

Answer: I have no idea.

So congratulations, Memphis attorneys/boosters.

You made your threats and got some money, and I suppose that's good on some level. But including Rose in all this was silly and shortsighted. Yes, I realize he's now obligated to "consider … making a suitable donation” to the Tiger Scholarship Fund sometime before 2015, according to the agreement he signed. But if I were Rose I'd consider it only for a second, then simply decide I'd rather not.
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