Tag:Big East
Posted on: November 12, 2011 11:01 am
 

NC State's Leslie among three suspended Friday

By Jeff Borzello

North Carolina State announced on Friday that forward C.J. Leslie will sit out the first three games of the season due to receiving impermissible benefits.

Leslie and his half-brother accepted $410 from a friend after a car accident last May. The friend, a former NC State student, allowed Leslie to borrow his car and also paid an apartment application fee for Leslie’s half-brother.

NC State reported the violations to the NCAA.

“I understand the issue and regret what has occurred,” Leslie said. “I will support my teammates in every way possible and look forward to getting back on the court.”

Leslie missed the Wolfpack’s 84-75 win over UNC-Asheville on Friday, and will also be on the sidelines for Sunday’s contest against Morehead State, and Wednesday’s game against Princeton.

He averaged 11.0 points and 7.2 rebounds per game last season.

Glen Rice Jr. suspended for violating team rules

Shortly before Georgia Tech opened its season against Florida A&M, head coach Brian Gregory announced that Glen Rice Jr. had been suspended for three games for a violation of team rules.

Gregory did not get into specifics.

“The guys are learning that there are consequence, but there’s also going to be growth,” Gregory told reporters after the Yellow Jackets’ 92-59 victory. “We’re here to help him grow from this.”

Rice Jr., a 6-foot-5 swingman, averaged 12.8 points and 5.6 rebounds last season. He sat out last night’s game and will also miss next week’s matchups against Delaware State and Saint Joseph’s.

Marquette’s Juan Anderson suspended for three games

The NCAA has suspended Marquette freshman forward Juan Anderson for three games because he accepted a free ticket to a Brewers’ playoff game.

The Golden Eagles self-reported the violation.

“My college eligibility is much too valuable for me to risk,” Anderson said.

The freshman from California had been receiving rave reviews for his performance in early workouts and practices.  

Photo: US Presswire

More College Basketball coverage
Posted on: November 10, 2011 4:25 pm
Edited on: November 10, 2011 4:26 pm
 

Source: Pitt's J.J. Moore suspended for one game

By Jeff Goodman

Pittsburgh sophomore wing J.J. Moore has been suspended for one game by the NCAA due to his participation in an unauthorized summer league game.

According to a source, Moore - who is expected to battle Lamar Patterson for a starting spot with the departure of Gilbert Brown - will sit out the season-opener against Albany on Friday night.

The 6-foot-6 Moore averaged 3.7 points per game last season.

Pittsburgh enters the season ranked No. 10 in the country.
Posted on: November 9, 2011 11:20 am
Edited on: November 9, 2011 11:54 am
 

Boeheim can't recall last time Cuse was this deep



By Jeff Goodman


Jim Boeheim's team is so deep that he might wind up redshirting Trevor Cooney.

"He's our fifth guard right now," said the Syracuse coach. "We'll make a decision this week."

Cooney, a top 75 player and arguably the best pure shooter on the team, is behind Scoop Jardine, Brandon Triche, Dion Waiters and Michael Carter-Williams.

That's serious depth.

It's more of the same up front - where Boeheim will likely rotate three guys between the power forward and center spot: sophomores Fab Melo and Baye Moussa Keita as well as freshman Rakeem Christmas.

"Christmas will start at the four - and also play some at the five," Boeheim said.

"Fab has made major strides," he added. "He's a different player. He lost some weight and is playing with confidence. Last year he couldn't get up and down."

"Both of our big guys from last year - Fab and Moussa - have gotten a lot better," Boeheim continued.

That's seven or eight deep - and we haven't even touched on the team's most heralded returnee: senior forward Kris Joseph, who led the team in scoring a year ago at 14.3 points per game.

There's also the group's most underrated player, sophomore C.J. Fair.

This team may not have that dominant player - a lottery pick - but what it does have is strength in its numbers. So much so that Boeheim doesn't seem at all concerned about replacing the production of graduated big man Rick Jackson - who averaged a double-double last year.

"This is the deepest team we've had in many years," Boeheim admitted. "I think we've got a chance."
Posted on: November 8, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Lavin returns to St. John's practice

By Matt Norlander

There is still no definitive timetable for when he will coach in a game again, but Tuesday, according to ESPNNewYork.com, Steve Lavin showed up at St. John's practice.

The second-year Red Storm coach announced at the end of last season that he had prostate cancer. A little more than a month ago, Lavin had successful surgery to remove the cancer.

From ESPNNewYork.com's Kieran Darcy:
It is still undecided whether Lavin will coach the team's next game, Wednesday night versus Lehigh. Lavin's surgery was deemed "a success" by the coach in a statement released by the school, and the coach has been consulting with his doctor daily about when to return to the team. He receives a DVD of every practice at his Manhattan apartment and is putting together the team's daily practice plans based on watching them.

Lavin is slowly making his way back to the young team, a team that defeated William & Mary on college basketball's opening night Monday.


Posted on: November 8, 2011 3:18 pm
Edited on: November 8, 2011 3:37 pm
 

Calhoun knows Napier is the key for UConn



By Jeff Goodman


Everyone can talk all they want about Jeremy Lamb, how he's primed for a mammoth season in which some even have pegged him as a Preseason First Team All-American.

They can talk about the new guy, talented freshman Andre Drummond - who could well become a lottery pick after this season.

They can talk about veteran big man Alex Oriakhi and how if he becomes consistent, this UConn team could go back-to-back.

But none hold more to the Huskies success this season than Shabazz Napier.

And it's got nothing to do with the fact that backup point guard Ryan Boatright is still dealing with NCAA eligibility issues, either.

With or without Boatright in the fold, Napier is the most important man in Storrs, Conn., this season - and one of the most important in all of college hoops.

"Shabazz is the key to UConn," Huskies coach Jim Calhoun admitted to CBSSports.com.

Napier was the guy who played alongside Kemba Walker a year ago. He was a relentless defender who brought toughness to the table. Now he'll be asked to run the show.

Thus far, in two exhibition games, Napier has dished out 28 assists and committed just four turnovers.

"He was better running the team in the games than he's been in practice," Calhoun said.

Some question Napier's ability to shoot the ball - after he shot just 37 percent overall and 33 percent from long distance as a freshman.

"I'm not worried about that at all," Calhoun said.

Two things that Napier can do: Guard and shoot the ball.

Running the team will be the key for the Huskies, though.

Photo: AP
Posted on: November 8, 2011 11:00 am
Edited on: November 8, 2011 11:04 am
 

No timetable for Lavin's return

By Jeff Borzello

St. John’s won its opener without Steve Lavin on the sidelines, and it still remains unclear on when he will return.

Lavin is currently at home recovering from prostate cancer surgery on Oct 6.

“He’s starting to get back to normal,” Gene Keady said after Monday night’s game against William & Mary. “He laughs a lot now. He walks a lot. He’s making some progress about getting back to a normal life.”

Keady, the former Purdue head coach, was brought on last year as a special assistant to Lavin. Assistant coach Mike Dunlap, known for his X's and O's acumen, has taken over head coaching duties with Lavin out.

There is no set return date for Lavin to come back to the St. John’s bench, although some have been pointing to early December as the timetable.

“It’s basically when he wants to,” a source told CBSSports.com. “When he feels ready.”

St. John’s faces Arizona on Nov. 17, then the championship or consolation game of the 2K Sports Classic. The Red Storm also head to Kentucky on Dec. 1 as part of the SEC-Big East Challenge.

Lavin went 21-12 in his first season with St. John’s, leading the Red Storm to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2002. He also signed one of the top three recruiting classes in the country.

Photo: US Presswire

Posted on: November 7, 2011 10:12 pm
 

Despite win, new St. John's era not as expected



By
Jeff Borzello

JAMAICA, N.Y. – The first half of Monday night’s opener against William & Mary certainly wasn’t what was envisioned with the talk of a new era in St. John’s basketball.

Steve Lavin at home recovering from prostate surgery; three top recruits ineligible for the start of the season; and a nine-point deficit to William & Mary in front of a lackluster crowd at Carnesecca Arena.

The second half, though, was the future – and present – at St. John’s. Overwhelming defensive pressure, effective transition offense and a youthful energy that has been missing from the Red Storm program for most of the past decade. Moreover, the 4500 fans in the building woke up and made it tough for William & Mary.

With four players scoring in double-figures, St. John’s dominated the second half en route to a 74-59 win over the Tribe. A 22-5 run after W&M scored to open the stanza put the Red Storm on top, with constant turnovers from the Tribe guards putting the game out of reach.

“The way we played in the second half is the way St. John’s plays,” freshman guard D’Angelo Harrison said.

Outside of 3-point shooting, St. John’s handled William & Mary in nearly all facets of the game. The Red Storm outscored the Tribe 44-10 in the paint, 28-0 off turnovers, 9-2 on second-chance opportunities and 16-0 in fast-break points. They forced 21 William & Mary turnovers and shot nearly 68 percent from the field in the second half.

St. John’s used seven players in the game, six of them newcomers and four of them playing college basketball for the first time. Despite the lack of depth, the Red Storm pressed throughout the game, drifting back into an active and aggressive 2-3 zone when William & Mary broke the full-court pressure.

Nurideen Lindsey (pictured) led the way with 19 points, the majority coming off steals and deflections that led to transition baskets at the other end. The athleticism and length of St. John’s simply wore down William & Mary in the second half.

“When the guys came out, we were a little tight,” Lindsey said. “We didn’t come out ready to play. We knew we had to turn it up a notch; we got more intense into the game. During halftime, we got together collectively and we understood that, defensively, that’s what we had to do.”

God’s Gift Achiuwa, the famously-named junior college transfer, went for 17 points and nine rebounds. More importantly, though, he stayed out of foul trouble and played 38 minutes. Moe Harkless had 17 points and eight rebounds.

During the first half, it seemed like St. John’s was looking for someone to take the reins in the huddle and be a leader. Harrison took on that role in the second half, becoming the emotional and vocal general the Red Storm needed. Once the intensity was there, talent simply took over.

“You can say it brought us together,” Harrison said. “Every game is an experience for us.”

“We were just playing basketball out there,” Harkless added. “I couldn’t really predict how the first game would go, but it’s definitely a great feeling.”

When Harkless first committed to St. John’s in August of 2010, no one knew what to expect. What followed was a whirlwind of commitments from across the country, both high school and junior college. There were three casualties along the way – Amir Garrett, JaKarr Sampson, Norvel Pelle – but the new faces of St. John’s basketball were still unknown to most people.

Tonight might have been the culmination of all the hype and anticipation of the last 15 months – or are we still waiting for the page to turn in Red Storm basketball lore? Lavin still hasn't returned and at least two recruits are waiting to be cleared.

This wasn’t Steve Lavin coaching Norm Roberts’ players. Heck, it wasn’t even Steve Lavin coaching Steve Lavin’s players.

But make no mistake; this is a new era in St. John’s basketball – even if it’s not how everyone pictured it.

Photo: US Presswire

Posted on: November 7, 2011 11:32 am
Edited on: November 7, 2011 11:39 am
 

Naismith Preseason Top 50 - Early Edition

By Jeff Goodman

The Naismith Preseason List will be released this afternoon, but CBSSports.com has obtained a bootleg copy of it (OK, not really - but that sounds cool).

Anyway, the major difference between the Naismith and the Wooden (and why I prefer the Naismith) is that it includes freshmen.

There were seven frosh on the Preseason list: Three from Kentucky (Anthony Davis, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist and Marquis Teague), Brad Beal (Florida), Andre Drummond (UConn), Quincy Miller (Baylor) and Austin Rivers (Duke).

Two teams - North Carolina and Kentucky - have four players on the list. UConn, Ohio State and Vandy each have a trio.

Here is the complete list:

NAISMITH PRESEASON TOP 50

Tim Abromaitis, F, Sr., Notre Dame
Harrison Barnes, F, Soph., North Carolina
Will Barton, G, Soph., Memphis
Brad Beal, G, Fr., Florida
William Buford, G, Sr., Ohio State
Aaron Craft, G, Soph., Ohio State
Anthony Davis, F, Fr., Kentucky
Marcus Denmon, G, Sr., Missouri
Andre Drummond, C, Fr., UConn
Festus Ezeli, C, Sr., Vanderbilt
Ashton Gibbs, G, Sr., Pittsburgh
Michael Glover, F, Sr., Iona
Drew Gordon, F, Sr., New Mexico
Draymond Green, F, Sr., Michigan State
JaMychal Green, F, Sr., Alabama
Tim Hardaway Jr., G, Soph., Michigan
Elias Harris, F, Jr., Gonzaga
John Henson, F, Jr., North Carolina
Tu Holloway, G, Sr., Xavier
Robbie Hummel, F, Sr., Purdue
Joe Jackson, G, Soph., Memphis
John Jenkins, G, Soph., Vanderbilt
Orlando Johnson, G, Sr., UC Santa Barbara
Darius Johnson-Odom, G, Sr., Marquette
Perry Jones III, F, Soph., Baylor
Terrence Jones, F, Soph., Kentucky
Kevin Jones, F, Sr., West Virginia
Kris Joseph, F, Sr., Syracuse
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, F, Fr., Kentucky
Jeremy Lamb, G, Soph., UConn
Kendall Marshall, G, Soph., North Carolina
Ray McCallum, G, Soph., Detroit
Doug McDermott, F, Soph., Creighton
Khris Middleton, F, Jr., Texas A&M
Quincy Miller, F, Fr., Baylor
Reeves Nelson, F, Jr., UCLA
Andrew Nicholson, F, Sr., St. Bonaventure
Alex Oriakhi, C, Jr., UConn
Austin Rivers, G, Fr., Duke
Thomas Robinson, F, Jr., Kansas
Terrence Ross, G, Soph., Washington
John Shurna, F, Sr., Northwestern
Peyton Siva, G, Jr., Louisville
Josh Smith, C, Soph., UCLA
Jared Sullinger, C, Soph., Ohio State
Jordan Taylor, G, Sr., Wisconsin
Jeffery Taylor, G/F, Sr., Vanderbilt
Marquis Teague, G, Fr., Kentucky
Patric Young, C, Soph., Florida
Tyler Zeller, F, Sr., North Carolina
 
 
 
 
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