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Tag:Marquette
Posted on: January 7, 2012 7:32 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2012 7:33 pm
 

Marquette starting center's season over

By Jeff Goodman

Marquette junior big man Chris Otule's season is over.

Otule suffered a left knee injury on Dec. 6, but was making progress and Marquette coach Buzz Williams anticipated he would return sometime in Big East play. 

However, Williams told CBSSports.com -- shortly after his team's loss at Syracuse on Saturday -- that Otule will have season-ending surgery on Tuesday after a setback last week. 

"We will apply for a sixth-year two years from now," Williams said. 

Otule wasn't a guy who put up impressive numbers (5.0 ppg, 4.4 rpg), but he was key for Williams because he was a legitimate center. Now the Golden Eagles are either forced to play Davante Gardner extended minutes or have to play forwards Jae Crowder or Jamil Wilson in the middle. 

Posted on: January 5, 2012 12:56 am
 

Night Court: Hoyas get another impressive win



By
Jeff Borzello

Here’s everything you need to know about Wednesday’s slate of college basketball games …

Game of the day: Marquette continues to confound everyone. The Golden Eagles dominated Georgetown for the first 27 minutes of the game, taking a 17-point lead with 13:10 left. They then went seven and a half minutes without a field goal, allowing the Hoyas to get back into the game. Hollis Thompson – who beat Alabama earlier this season on a 3-pointer – finally broke a tie with 24 seconds left as Georgetown won, 73-70. Jason Clark scored 18 points in the second half. Marquette has now lost three of five.

Win to brag about: Temple has now defeated a top-10 team in four consecutive seasons, the latest coming against No. 3 Duke on Wednesday night, 78-73. The Owls were extremely efficient from the field, shooting 56 percent from the field, and also outrebounded the Blue Devils. Khalif Wyatt led the way with 22 points, including back-to-back 3-pointers to give Temple a nine-point lead it wouldn’t relinquish. It was Temple’s first win over Duke since 1996.

Loss to hide from: Losing to Illinois isn’t bad in itself, but Northwestern needs to win that kind of game if it hopes to get to the NCAA tournament in March. The Wildcats were up by 10 in the first half, but struggled offensively in the final 20 minutes, falling 57-56. John Shurna had 17 points in the first half for Northwestern, but was held to just three in the second stanza. A Myke Henry free throw with six seconds left won the game for the Illini.

Player who deserves improper benefits: Wichita State avoided a loss at Evansville on Wednesday, carried mostly by 7-foot senior Garrett Stutz. The big man shot 12-for-14 from the floor, finishing with 29 points and 10 rebounds. He also contributed four assists and three blocks. Not surprisingly, he grabbed the game-clinching rebound in the 67-66 victory. On the other side, Colt Ryan went for 31 points.

Player(s) who does not deserve improper benefits: The entire Towson team. The Tigers have struggled this season, but Wednesday’s loss at Drexel might have been the low point. They scored just 27 points against the Dragons, the fewest points ever scored in a CAA game. Towson also tied the NCAA record for consecutive losses, at 34. The Tigers made eight baskets all game, shooting 21.6 percent from the field.

Numbers don’t lie:

  • 43-3. That’s Kansas’ record against Kansas State in their last 46 meetings. The Jayhawks won the latest meeting, destroying Kansas State on the boards en route to a 67-49 victory. Kansas outrebounded K-State, 50-26. Thomas Robinson had 14 points and 15 boards.
  • 2007. That’s the last time Iowa won back-to-back road games in the Big Ten, which the Hawkeyes accomplished Wednesday night by beating Minnesota. They had defeated Wisconsin over the weekend.
  • 15-0. Murray State remained undefeated by beating Eastern Kentucky, 76-67. The Racers are one win away from matching the school’s best start, which was set in 1935-36.
  • 16-0. This is the second year in a row that Syracuse has opened the season with 16 straight wins. The Orange beat Providence, 87-73. 

Three other notable results:

  1. We’re still waiting for Xavier to snap out of its funk. The Musketeers are now 1-5 since the Crosstown brawl, after losing to La Salle, 80-70. On the other side, the Explorers improved to 11-4 with the victory.
  2. Looks like Georgia State is for real. The Panthers went into VCU on Wednesday and knocked off the Rams, 55-53. Georgia State has won 11 in a row.
  3. Dayton led for only about two minutes in regulation, but outscored Saint Louis 15-8 in overtime en route to a 79-72 win.

Notes:

  • Iowa State held off Texas, 77-71. Longhorns’ point guard J’Covan Brown missed most of the second half with an ankle injury.
  • Cincinnati won its seventh in a row, beating Notre Dame 71-55 in Yancy Gates’ first game back.
  • Saint Joseph’s overcame a 16-point second half deficit to beat Duquesne in overtime, 84-82. T.J. McConnell had 28 points and five assists in the loss.
  • Memphis beat Tennessee for the second time this season, 69-51.
  • Rutgers is now 0-2 since beating Florida. West Virginia scored 51 points in the first half en route to a dominant 85-64 victory.
  • The Missouri Valley is going to be fun. Illinois State went into Missouri State and won, while Northern Iowa beat Indiana State by 17.
  • Bet this is the last time Florida State scores 85 points this year. The Seminoles beat Auburn, 85-56.
  • Remember when Tulane was 9-0? The Green Wave have now lost three of their last five, after falling to UCF.
  • Heck of a day for Philadelphia basketball. Drexel, La Salle, Temple, Penn and Saint Joseph’s all picked up victories.
  • Southern Miss improved to 14-2 with a two-point win over East Carolina. Interestingly, the Golden Eagles never trailed.
  • Delaware’s Jamelle Hagins totaled 21 points and 18 boards in a one-point win over Hofstra.

On tap: It’s not as loaded as Wednesday, but there’s plenty of action. The game of the night is in the Big Ten, as Michigan heads to Indiana. Pittsburgh looks to get back on the right track at DePaul, while Arizona trips to UCLA. Stanford also faces Oregon, while California and Oregon State do battle.

Photo: US Presswire

Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:36 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 4:37 pm
 

Podcast: This one is lacking in holiday cheer

By Matt Norlander

It's Wednesday, so that means Goodman and Parrish are back on the podcast. Parrish saw Jay-Z and Kanye Saturday night, so we have to lead our show with how the show everyone's talking about. Playing the same song eight times in a row? That apparently happened.

After the music gabbing, its on to the hoops, of course. Ben Howland refusing to kick Reeves Nelson off the team, Marquette's ability, Missouri as an elite team, Goodman and I yelling at each other about Marcus Denmon. Oh, this is a good one, indeed. Then there's the Big Ten/Big East debate, which is increasing (we're totally responsible for this).

Sorry this one was late -- had to get our ducks in a row in order to get the three of us on at the same time. We think it's worth it, though.

While we watch the throne:
  • From the beginning: A full review of the Watch the Throne show Parrish was at.
  • 5:20: So, about that whole Reeves-Nelson-still-on-UCLA thing ...
  • 8:54: Goodman was at MSG for the Jimmy V Classic. He's got a hotel story first before we get to the hoops.
  • 11:37: Phil Pressey and Missouri. And Goodman gets angry at me! CONFLICT!
  • 16:10: Goodman writes about Marquette's lack of talent. I disagree. And so we fight a little more. We're both on about a combined seven hours of sleep, so it got a little ornery.
  • 20:50: It's December, in case you hadn't heard. This is the slowest time, the next three weeks, of college basketball. Storylines come in smaller supply, the meaningful matchups aren't as much there due to finals, the holidays and the lead up to conference play.
  • 24:29: The most under-the-radar team in a major conference right now: Kansas State? Goodman talked with Frank Martin this week.
  • 26:25: Big Ten/Big East/Big 12 talk. Oh, and Goodman chirps at Parrish about Thomas Robinson. This was just an awesome podcast for bickering.
  • 31:47: Wrap-up chat and miscellaneous talk. Goodman and I make nice again, which is good, because I'm kind of terrified of the guy when he gets angry.

You can listen to the CBSSports.com College Basketball Podcast every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The podcasts go up here and on iTunes. The Wednesday show is dedicated to keeping the egos of CBSSports.com national writers Jeff Goodman and Gary Parrish inflated. Mondays and Fridays are for the real people to come on. Here's the iTunes link. We also have an RSS feed for you to track. If you're still going strong and hanging on to a Zune, then, yes, you can listen on that as well.


Posted on: December 7, 2011 1:22 am
 

Marquette boasts toughness -- and talent

By Jeff Goodman

NEW YORK - Marquette feels disrespected. No, not because the Golden Eagles were picked to finish sixth by the coaches in the league or due to the fact they believe they should be ranked higher than 11th in the country.

Because of the "toughness" tag that the program is unable to shed.

"That's all people talk about," Marquette senior Jae Crowder said shortly after burying a 3-pointer with 6.3 seconds left to give Marquette a 79-77 win over Washington. "At some point it has to end."

"That makes us one-dimensional," he added. "And that's not what we are."

For a while there, Marquette coach Buzz Williams loved the label. Basked in it. Why? It's the ultimate sign of respect when an opposing coach says that your team plays hard and is tough.

But enough is enough.

People need to finally start talking about the talent on this team, the talent in this program, in conjunction with the toughness. Lazar Hayward went from a mid-major recruit to an NBA first-rounder. Jimmy Butler did the same. Darius Johnson-Odom was also an under-the-radar guy who has a chance to play at the next level.

Williams may not be recruiting McDonald's All-Americans, but he's brought in plenty of talent to go along with the toughness.

Johnson-Odom and Crowder are the clear-cut stars and leaders of this year's team. DJO finished with 23 points while Crowder added 18 - including the game-winner. However, Vander Blue has made a significant improvement, Todd Mayo (O.J.'s little brother) has been terrific as a freshman coming off the bench and the inside duo of Chris Otule, Davante Gardner has been solid. Junior Cadougan won't blow anyone away, but he knows how to run a team and has the ability get his teammates open looks. There's also depth with guys like Jamil Wilson, the defensive-minded Derrick Wilson, Juan Anderson and Jamail Jones.

"At some point, people have to give the credit that the program is much deeper than just toughness," Williams said. "At some point, it's more than playing really hard and more than just toughness."

You don't go into Madison and knock off Wisconsin solely on grit and determination. You don't follow it up with a victory over a Washington team that could have three future NBA guys in Madison Square Garden without talented players.

This group is about more than just toughness.

But if I were Williams and Marquette, I'd continue to embrace the "toughness" label.

It's complimentary -- and seems to be working.
Posted on: November 29, 2011 4:52 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2011 5:06 pm
 

Marquette may be more formidable this season

By Jeff Goodman

Marquette lost an NBA player yet Buzz Williams' team may be improved from a year ago.

There's certainly more quality depth than there was a year ago - or at any point since he inherited the reigns from Tom Crean. Darius Johnson-Odom is a year older and while Jae Crowder may not be Jimmy Butler or Lazar Hayward (a pair of first-rounders over the past two seasons), his production could exceed both.

Crowder, through five games, is putting up 17.8 points and 8 boards per game.

"He's a really good player, is extremely intelligent and instinctive," Marquette coach Buzz Williams said.

DJO and Crowder are a potent 1-2 punch, but the difference in this year's team is the maturity of sophomore guard Vander Blue, the presence of a true floor leader (Junior Cadougan, right) and the addition of a potent scorer off the bench (Todd Mayo)

Blue is averaging 12.2 points per game, Cadougan is a significant upgrade over Dwight Buycks at the point guard position and Mayo -- O.J.'s little brother -- is averaging 7.8 points in just 16.6 minutes.

"Dwight helped us win a lot of games, but Junior is a different type of player," Williams said. "He delivers the ball on time and on target."

Cadougan is a true point guard who makes life easier for those around him - and he's finally in shape.

It took Cadougan a while to work his way back from an injury he suffered as a freshman, but he's down to 200 pounds and Williams says he's in the best shape that he's ever seen him. Part of that can be attributed to a contest that Williams posed to Cadougan and rotund big man Davante Gardner. Williams has gone from 233 to a rather svelte 197 pounds and Gardner dropped 27 pounds prior to the start of practice.

"I did it selfishly. I had to turn it into a contest to make me accountable," Williams laughed. "But they weren't going to beat me. I wasn't going to let that happen."

True, the schedule hasn't been taxing. It began with Mount St. Mary's, has included Winthrop, Norfolk State twice and also featured a 30-point pasting on Ole Miss.

However, that'll change soon. Marquette plays at Wisconsin and in New York against Washington in the next 10 days - and will host Vanderbilt late in December when the Commodores are expected to have a healthy Festus Ezeli.

It's difficult to question a Williams-coached team. The constant? They play hard each and every possession. Williams has led Marquette to 69 victories in his first three seasons and a trio of NCAA tournament appearances - including a Sweet 16 berth last year.

Just to compare, Crean won 56 games his first three years and went to the NCAA tournament once. Hall of Famer Al McGuire, who won a national title at the school in 1977, won 43 games his first three seasons at Marquette.

Photo: US PRESSWIRE
Posted on: November 12, 2011 11:01 am
 

NC State's Leslie among three suspended Friday

By Jeff Borzello

North Carolina State announced on Friday that forward C.J. Leslie will sit out the first three games of the season due to receiving impermissible benefits.

Leslie and his half-brother accepted $410 from a friend after a car accident last May. The friend, a former NC State student, allowed Leslie to borrow his car and also paid an apartment application fee for Leslie’s half-brother.

NC State reported the violations to the NCAA.

“I understand the issue and regret what has occurred,” Leslie said. “I will support my teammates in every way possible and look forward to getting back on the court.”

Leslie missed the Wolfpack’s 84-75 win over UNC-Asheville on Friday, and will also be on the sidelines for Sunday’s contest against Morehead State, and Wednesday’s game against Princeton.

He averaged 11.0 points and 7.2 rebounds per game last season.

Glen Rice Jr. suspended for violating team rules

Shortly before Georgia Tech opened its season against Florida A&M, head coach Brian Gregory announced that Glen Rice Jr. had been suspended for three games for a violation of team rules.

Gregory did not get into specifics.

“The guys are learning that there are consequence, but there’s also going to be growth,” Gregory told reporters after the Yellow Jackets’ 92-59 victory. “We’re here to help him grow from this.”

Rice Jr., a 6-foot-5 swingman, averaged 12.8 points and 5.6 rebounds last season. He sat out last night’s game and will also miss next week’s matchups against Delaware State and Saint Joseph’s.

Marquette’s Juan Anderson suspended for three games

The NCAA has suspended Marquette freshman forward Juan Anderson for three games because he accepted a free ticket to a Brewers’ playoff game.

The Golden Eagles self-reported the violation.

“My college eligibility is much too valuable for me to risk,” Anderson said.

The freshman from California had been receiving rave reviews for his performance in early workouts and practices.  

Photo: US Presswire

More College Basketball coverage
Posted on: October 21, 2011 11:35 am
 

Notebook: Big East Media Day news and notes



By Jeff Borzello

NEW YORK – Conference media days are a dream for writers that want a lot of information and people in one place. Simply put, they provide a treasure trove of nuggets on each team in the league. There were too many leftovers in the notebook to leave out and not share with everyone. Here are some of the more interesting tidbits gathered on Wednesday at Big East Media Day.

- Notre Dame forward Tim Abromaitis was recently suspended for four games after the NCAA ruled on a violation he committed three years ago. “We tried to fight it, but a rule is a rule,” Abromaitis said. “I accepted it.”

- Who will replace Ben Hansbrough at the point guard spot? Sophomore Eric Atkins (above), who led the Big East in assist-to-turnover ratio last season. “He was our sixth man last year, but he’s ready to elevate his game,” Abromaitis said.

- Sophomore Jerian Grant received rave reviews for his work over the summer and in the early part of the fall. “He’s playing really well,” Abromaitis said. “He’s learning things as a player, moving without the ball, guarding his man. That’s what we’ll need him to do.”

- DePaul received three pieces of bad news in the past week. Junior forward Tony Freeland will miss the season with a shoulder injury, while freshman Montray Clemons is done for the year after rupturing a tendon in his knee. Moreover, the NCAA ruled freshman Macari Brooks ineligible. “We thought we were pretty deep,” head coach Oliver Purnell said. “We can’t afford any more injuries.”

- Purnell thinks Cleveland Melvin (right) is somewhat underrated on a national level, after averaging 14.3 points and winning Big East Rookie of the Year honors. “Probably so,” Purnell said. “He had a good freshman year and a really good summer.”

- Rutgers brought in a highly-touted freshman class – and the incoming guards are impressing early on. “Our guards have a little more experience than our big men,” forward Dane Miller said, pointing to Myles Mack and Jerome Seagears. Coach Mike Rice, however, thinks Eli Carter could make more of an impact than both of them. “He might lead my freshman in points per game.”

- Rice is impressed with Kansas State transfer Wally Judge. “He’s a physical specimen. He just has to develop that consistency.”

- Forward Kadeem Jack will likely be out until mid-January with a foot injury. Jack was looking like he would have a major impact in the frontcourt. “He’s somebody where the light was already on,” Rice said.

- Marquette forward Jae Crowder is pegging sophomore Vander Blue (right) as a true breakout performer. “He had a great summer, played in the Pro/Am, played for USA basketball,” Crowder said. “His confidence is up; last year, he lost confidence. A lot of pressure is on him.”

- Out of the freshmen, California native Juan Anderson has stood out the most to Crowder. “He’s athletic, he goes hard, has a great motor,” Crowder said. “Buzz [Williams] loves it, I love it.”

- Despite the loss of three starters from last season, West Virginia forward Kevin Jones thinks highly of this year’s team. “This is the most talented team I’ve been on,” he said – and that includes the Elite Eight group that had Da’Sean Butler and Devin Ebanks.

- Freshman point guard Jabarie Hinds was cleared to play late in the process, but he’s already been impressive. “He had to catch up,” Jones said. “But he’s looking real good, doing the right things.”

- With Czech Republican native Patrik Auda and Latvian guard Haralds Karlis in the fold, Seton Hall has taken a foreign turn recently. “It’s fun,” guard Jordan Theodore said. “I’m trying new foods, trying to teach them slang.”

- Fun fact: Auda knows five languages – Dutch, Spanish, Czech, English and Russian.

- Georgetown forward Hollis Thompson said the Hoyas still laugh about the infamous brawl in China over the summer. “It was a great bonding experience,” Thompson said.

- Roy Hibbert, Jeff Green, Dwyane Wade and other NBA players came back to Georgetown to work out during the lockout. Thompson said the one who benefitted the most was Henry Sims, who played against Hibbert on a regular basis.

Photo: US Presswire (Eric Atkins, Cleveland Melvin, Vander Blue)

Posted on: October 15, 2011 12:04 am
 

Buzz Williams serenades the Marquette crowd

By Matt Norlander

Only the charm of college basketball could make me temporarily put aside my seething hatred for this song.

And Buzz looks downright svelte. If only he had the same control over his voice as he does his diet.

 
 
 
 
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