Tag:Florida
Posted on: August 17, 2011 2:56 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 3:10 pm
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Teddy Dupay shocked to discover he's alias-worthy

By Matt Norlander

To me, the most peculiar detail about the Yahoo! Sports blowtorch of a story on Miami athletics was that Teddy Dupay's name appeared in the piece.

Former Florida guard and easy target for opponents' fans -- that Teddy Dupay. The Teddy Dupay who left college earlier last decade due to gambling allegations. The Teddy Dupay who was accused of rape and kidnapping three years ago. Dupay never attended Miami, and until Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011, had no public connection to The U. Apparently Ponzi schemer Nevin Shapiro considered himself enough of a Dupay doppelganger to use the alias when checking into hotels.

An unfortunate, but funny, minor wrinkle in the massive story.

How did Dupay feel about this? Well, a hearty applause to Jeff Eisenberg over at The Dagger, for he already tracked down the former Florida gunner and got his reaction.
"It was screwing up my Android I was getting so many text messages," Dupay said Wednesday by phone. "My first instinct was, 'Oh no, not again' because it attached my name to a very negative situation, but I've realized I can't control what people think. ... I've had my name pop up in much more bizarre spots than that article yesterday."
Miami report fallout
Eisenberg reports that Dupay is now an AAU girls basketball coach and promotes "others to focus on nutrition and health" in his spare and time is "in a very happy, very peaceful place."

Finding such a place after a turbulent college and post-college life isn't easy for a lot of athletes. Dupay seems headed the right way now, and that's uplifting.

"The situation yesterday, I'm going to find the good and find the positives," Dupay told Eisenberg. "Clearly it had nothing to do with me. Clearly there was nothing I could do to stop that from happening. But if I can share my message and get people excited about a good comeback story, then that's something good that can come out of this."

Photo: AP
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: August 11, 2011 9:14 am
Edited on: August 11, 2011 9:16 am
 

Allan Chaney's career at Virginia Tech is over

By Jeff Goodman

Allan Chaney’s career is over. At least at Virginia Tech.

The talented forward has been denied medical clearance to return to the court with the Hokies.

“Allan Chaney has been through a great deal in the last year and a half,” Virginia Tech coach Seth Greenberg said in a statement. “Everyone involved in our basketball program feels for him. Unfortunately, this rare condition will prevent him from continuing his career here at Virginia Tech. We will do everything in our power to assist Allan as he goes through his next procedure and support him in every way possible.”

Chaney, a Connecticut native who transferred to Blacksburg after spending his freshman year with Billy Donovan at Florida, was supposed to be a major piece of Seth Greenberg’s plan.

Chaney sat out due to transfer rules two years ago and then was diagnosed with myocarditis in April of 2010 after passing out. He missed all of last season.

However, he was optimistic that he would be cleared last month.

``Well, I must say that I am disappointed, but Tech has done everything for me through this process and they still are!,” Chaney tweeted, I will play somewhere!”

``Wish things were different, but I can’t waste anymore time. Have to stay positive and move on.”

This is a situation that appears similar to that of Emmanuel Negedu, who had cardiac issues while at Tennessee, wasn’t cleared by the Vols – and then transferred to New Mexico.

His career with the Lobos lasted just 10 games. Negedu’s defibrillator produced a reading that ultimately ended his college career.

Now it’s likely that the 6-foot-8 Chaney will attempt to find a new home, somewhere that will clear him to play college basketball.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: August 9, 2011 11:32 am
Edited on: August 9, 2011 5:11 pm
 

SEC Offseason Roundup

By Jeff Goodman

SEC Offseason Roundup

Alabama – The Crimson Tide will play in the Puerto Rico Tip-Off and also have non-conference games against Georgetown (12-1), vs. Kansas State (12-17) in Kansas City, vs. Oklahoma State (12-21) in Birmingham and at Georgia Tech (1-3). Jason Carter (Chipola JC) and Kendall Durant (NAIA in Texas) both transferred out of the program.

Arkansas – Mike Anderson brought his staff with him from Missouri: Melvin Watkins, Matt Zimmerman, T.J. Cleveland and Jeff Daniels (director of basketball operations). The Razorbacks will play at Uconn (12-3), at Oklahoma (12-10) and vs. Michigan (1-21). Rotnei Clarke (Butler), Jeff Peterson (Florida State) and Glenn Bryant (Eastern Michigan) all transferred out of the program.

Auburn – The Tigers will play in the Diamond Head Classic in Hawaii (12-22/25) and also have non-league contests at Seton Hall (12-2) and vs. South Florida (12-15). Earnest Ross (Missouri) and Ty Armstrong left the program while Varez Ward (Texas) and Noel Johnson (Clemson) are both eligible this season.

Florida – Billy Donovan had a major shake-up with his staff as Larry Shyatt took the head job at Wyoming, Richard Pitino returned to Louisville and Rob Lanier went back to Texas as the associate head coach. Donovan’s new staff consists of former Arkansas head man John Pelphrey, ex-St. John’s head coach Norm Roberts and Matt McCall – who was with the Gators in an administrative role. Florida will play in the five-team Global Sports Shootout, along with Ohio State, Jackson State, North Florida and Wright State. The Gators will play at Ohio State (11-15) and also have non-league games at Syracuse (12-2), vs. Arizona (12-7), vs. Texas A&M in Sunrise (12-17), vs. Florida State (12-22) and at Rutgers (12-29). Mike Rosario (Rutgers) is eligible this season after sitting out a year ago.

Georgia – The Bulldogs are in the CBE Classic (12-21/21) and also have non-conference contests at Xavier (11-25), at Colorado (11-28), vs. Cincinnati (12-2), vs. Georgia Tech (12-6) and at USC (12-17).

Kentucky – The Wildcats will play in the Hall of Fame event (11-19/20) and also will face Kansas in the Champions Classic (11-15) in NYC. John Calipari’s team’s non-conference slate includes contests vs. St. John’s (12-1), vs. UNC (12-3), at Indiana (12-10) and vs. Louisville (12-31). Ryan Harrow transferred in from N.C. State and Twany Beckham becomes eligible this season after transferring from Mississippi State last year.

LSU – The Tigers took a trip back in May to Italy. Lynn Nance retired and Nick Robinson slid over into his role as an assistant. LSU will play in the Charleston Classic (11-17/20) and also has non-league games at Rutgers (12-3), vs. Marquette (12-19) and against Virginia (1-2 or 3).  Three players – Aaron Dotson (Utah), Garrett Green (San Diego State) and Matt Derenbecker – left the program. Justin Hamilton is eligible this season after transferring in from Iowa State.

Mississippi – Andy Kennedy’s staff completely turned over. Mike White got the head gig at Louisiana Tech while Owen Miller and Torrey Ward are also gone. Kennedy replaced them with former FIU head coach Segrgio Ruoco, Al Pinkins and he also moved up Bill Armstrong. Robi Coker took Armstrong’s spot as the director of basketball operations. The Rebels will play Miami (11-25) at home, at DePaul (12-1), at Penn State (12-4), at Southern Miss (12-17) and at Dayton (12-30), Donald Williams, Will Bogan (Valparaiso), Trevor Gaskins (Louisiana Tech) and Isaiah Massey (Louisiana Tech) all left while Murphy Holloway (South Carolina) returned and may be eligible this year. Jelan Kendrick (Memphis) will be eligible after sitting out last season.

Mississippi State - The Bulldogs are currently on a trip to Amsterdam, Brussels and Paris and will also play in the Coaches vs. Cancer event (11-17/18). Rick Stansbury’s team will face West Virginia (12-3), Baylor in Dallas (12-28) and Utah State at home (12-31). Arnett Moultrie is eligible after sitting out last season following a transfer from UTEP.

South Carolina – Orlando Early (N.C. State) left and Darrin Horn bumped up Cypheus Bunton and also promoted Justin Phelps to director of basketball operations. The Gamecocks will play in the Las Vegas Invitational (11-25/26) and also face Providence (12-1) at home, go to Clemson (12-4) and play Ohio State (12-17) at home. Ramon Galloway (La Salle), Murphy Holloway (Ole Miss) and Stephen Spinella transferred out.

Tennessee – New coach Cuonzo Martin brought Jon Harris and Kent Williams from Missouri State and added Tracy Webster. He also kept Houston Fancher as the director of basketball operations. The Vols will play in the Maui Invitational and also a non-conference schedule that includes games against Pittsburgh (12-3), at Memphis (1-4) and vs. UConn (12-21).

Vanderbilt – King Rice left for the head job at Monmouth and was replaced by David Cason (Tulsa). The Commodores will play in the Legends Classic in New Jersey and also have non-league games vs. Xavier (11-28), at Louisville (12-2) and at Marquette (12-29). Andre Walker (Xavier) and Darshaun McClellan (Louisiana-Lafayette) both transferred with one year left of eligibility.

Offseason reports: Big 12 Pac-12 | Big Ten | ACC | Big East



Posted on: July 21, 2011 10:24 am
Edited on: July 21, 2011 10:47 am
 

Jabari Parker: The next Oscar Robertson?



By Jeff Borzello

Some people compare Jabari Parker to Paul Pierce because of his versatile offensive game.

Parker, though, is aiming a little bit higher for his NBA comparison. As in, the only player in NBA history to average a triple-double for a single season: Oscar Robertson.

“He played all positions,” Parker said. “He was way before his time.”

If Parker was anything less than the best prospect in the high-school game, regardless of class, that comparison might seem completely ridiculous. But given the way the 6-foot-8 Simeon (Ill.) junior has redefined his body and his game over the past year, he has future NBA All-Star written all over him.

Parker is an outstanding offensive player with the ability to knock down mid-range jumpers with ease, get to the basket and finish or post up around the rim. He can handle the ball effectively and is an excellent passer for his position.

“A lot of people say I have an old school game,” Parker said. “My body, I’m slimmed down, I can move much better.”

More on Recruiting

Nowadays, the players near the top of the rankings are outstanding athletes with explosiveness to spare. Parker is more contained, relying on a wide range of skills to be productive.

Going against the high-flyers of the 2012 and 2013 classes doesn’t faze Parker, though.

“It prepares me for college,” he said. “Some players might be more athletic than me, so I have to work harder.”

The son of former NBA player Sonny Parker will be the subject of one of the most hotly contested recruiting battles in the country, but for now he has a top five: Kansas, Washington, Duke, Illinois and Michigan State.

What endears the Jayhawks to Parker is their success.

“I’m looking to win, and they always go to the tournament,” he said.

The relationship between Washington coach Lorenzo Romar and the Parker family has the Huskies squarely in the mix.

“It started way before I played basketball; my dad played with Lorenzo,” he said.

Moreover, Parker said his brother might get a job on the staff at Washington -- but that wouldn’t affect his choice. “Not really,” Parker said. “He said it’s my decision.”

For the other three schools, Parker said the main thing that sticks out is the coaching.

Duke: “I like Coach K -- he’s a very good guy.”

Illinois: “I like Bruce [Weber] and Jerrence [Howard]. They’re good people.”

Michigan State: “Tom Izzo is one of the top coaches ever.”

While Parker has had the same top five since the spring, he said he is not limiting his recruitment to that quintet. Ohio State, Florida and BYU are among the other schools looking to break through into his favorites.

“Other schools can get on the list,” Parker said. “It’s just all the websites asked about my top five.”

As the top-rated player in his class, Parker has the luxury of going through his recruitment at his own pace. He could get it over with soon, or he could wait it out.

Considering how unselfish his game on the court is, it should come as no surprise that one of his reasons for waiting doesn’t revolve around him. 

“I want my teammates to get looked at,” Parker said. “I’m going to take my time, not rush the process.”

Oscar Robertson would be proud.

Photo: ESPN.com

Posted on: July 20, 2011 5:20 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2011 5:33 pm
 

Shaq Goodwin determined to be two-sport star

By Jeff Borzello

Shaq Goodwin makes no secret of his desire to play both football and basketball at the next level.

“I want to play both sports,” Goodwin said. “Football then basketball. I want to play both of them.”

There are obvious concerns to playing both sports at such a high level in college, but the 6-foot-8, 230-lb. forward/tight end isn’t worried. The major one, aside from simply being overworked and tired, is the amount of time he will miss should his football team make a prominent bowl game.

For example, the national championship game in football next season is on January 9, meaning there is a chance Goodwin might not be able to join his teammates on the hardwood until conference play is already underway.

His response? “Then I’ll be a national champion,” Goodwin said.

Goodwin is ranked higher in basketball – No. 13 in CBSSports.com’s Top 100 – than football, but he is set on being a dual-sport athlete. On the basketball court, Goodwin’s athleticism and toughness are noticeable immediately. He is not averse to drawing contact in the paint, and gets to the free-throw line as well as anyone in the country. Goodwin runs the floor well and has great vision and hands.

He usually plays with the Atlanta Celtics, but he ran with YOMCA Memphis on the EYBL circuit. Being a figurative outsider forced Goodwin to adjust his game slightly.

“I played good defense, not really looking to score,” he said. “Jarnell [Stokes] is the man on this team. I have no problem; I didn’t come to this team to be the man. It’s different.”

More on Recruiting

Based on his natural abilities, it’s no surprise that he is also a coveted recruit on the gridiron. If a school doesn’t offer him in both sports, he said, there is little chance they would land a commitment from him.

“I would look at them, but they wouldn’t be in my top five,” Goodwin said.

That vaunted quintet currently includes Memphis, Georgia, Alabama, Florida and UCLA.

The Bruins are the most interesting team on that list, given that Korey McCray, Goodwin’s former AAU coach, recently became an assistant coach in Westwood. Jordan Adams, Goodwin’s Atlanta Celtics teammate, also committed there in late June. He was supposed to visit UCLA in late June, but it never happened.

Goodwin said UCLA doesn’t stand out any more than the rest of the schools do, though.

“It’s good that I know two people going there, but that’s it,” he said.

Goodwin’s recruitment will be interesting to follow. There is not only a tug of war between different schools – different sports will be pulling him in opposite directions, too.

Photo: Five-Star Basketball

Posted on: July 20, 2011 3:24 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2011 6:33 pm
 

Jarnell Stokes plays with target on his back



By Jeff Borzello

As a five-star recruit with several of the top schools in the country on his tail, Jarnell Stokes knows he’s being watched on the AAU circuit.

The 6-foot-8 power forward from Memphis uses it as extra impetus to play his hardest every time out.

“First of all, you get a target on your back,” Stokes said. “People know who you are, so you have to bring it.”

Stokes, who will play at Oak Hill Academy (Va.) next season, was simply a dominant inside player for most of the past few years.

This spring and summer, though, he expanded his skill set and added a solid face-up game to his repertoire.

“I’m playing more outside, working on my versatility,” Stokes said.

It’s been working out well so far for Stokes, who ranked near the top of the Nike Elite Youth Basketball League in both points and rebounds, averaging 19.3 points and 8.4 rebounds through 14 games. He also topped the Peach Jam in rebounding, grabbing 9.7 per game in South Carolina last week.

More on Recruiting

Stokes’ ability to outmuscle smaller defenders and get past slower opponents enables him to get to the free-throw line at an extremely good rate and score efficiently in the post, too.

“Most defenders can’t guard inside and out,” he said. “I’m trying to play my best, bring effort to the floor. But there’s a lot more to improve on.”

Stokes ranks No. 16 in CBSSports.com’s Top 100, and he has plenty of schools on his trial. Recently, though, he named his top six schools: Connecticut, Kentucky, Arkansas, Florida, Memphis and Tennessee.

Out of that group, Arkansas and Memphis are standing out.

“I have a great relationship with the people there,” Stokes said.

Stokes had said in the past that he would likely have committed to Tennessee prior to Bruce Pearl and the Volunteers parting ways, but he is not ready to make a decision just yet.

“I’m looking at style of play,” Stokes said when asked about the factors in his final decision. “And I want to go to a winning program.”

Sounds like Stokes is looking forward to having a target on his back at the next level too.

Photo: Point Guard U

Posted on: June 29, 2011 4:09 pm
 

Versatile Kyle Anderson talks top five

INTERESTED TEAMS:



By Jeff Borzello

Normally, when scouts who have watched a player for three or four years still can’t figure out his position, it’s a bad thing.

In the case of Kyle Anderson, it’s just another sign of his versatility.

Anderson, a 6-foot-8 St. Anthony product (N.J), has the vision and passing ability of a point guard; the scoring prowess of a wing; and the size, finishing and rebounding skills of a power forward.

Ask Anderson, though, and he knows which position he wants to play at the next level.

“Point guard,” he said. “It’s the position I’m most comfortable at.”

At the NBPA Top 100 camp two weeks ago, Anderson played that position for the majority of the event.

“I’m just trying to be unselfish, play the point guard role,” he said.

Anderson has already made plenty of advancements in the recruiting process, trimming his list to five schools earlier this spring: Georgetown, Florida, Seton Hall, St. John’s and UCLA.

His potential to be a match-up problem and his passing ability would be a perfect fit for Georgetown.

“John Thompson III is a great coach, they run the Princeton offense,” Anderson said.

He also likes the way Florida head coach Billy Donovan makes players better during their time in Gainesville.

“Coach Donovan is great with player development,” Anderson said.

While Seton Hall might seem like it doesn’t belong in the same breath with the other programs, its proximity to Anderson’s Fairlawn, N.J., home could play a factor.

“It’s the hometown school, and all the guys play hard,” he said.

St. John’s emerged on the radar of several high-major prospects in the last year, as head coach Steve Lavin reeled in a nine-person class that included six players ranked in the top 100.

Anderson is impressed by the talent on the Red Storm’s roster.

“I like Coach Lavin, I like the class he has coming in,” he said.

Across the country sits UCLA, where Ben Howland has had a steady stream of pro point guards run through his program.

“Coach Howland puts point guards in the NBA,” Anderson said. “I think there’s five in the NBA right now.”

With most of the recruiting process behind him, the nation’s most versatile player is still not sure when exactly he wants to commit.

“No timetable,” Anderson said. “But before the season.”

Photo: NJ.com

Posted on: June 24, 2011 10:22 am
 

Patric Young holds key to Gators' season



By Jeff Borzello

After coming within three points of the Final Four last season, Florida has the pieces to make another run this campaign.

The Gators return starters Erving Walker and Kenny Boynton, two scoring guards that can get hot at any time. Rutgers transfer Mike Rosario, who averaged 16.7 points in the Big East, is now eligible. Moreover, top-five recruit Brad Beal will enter the fold on the perimeter as well.

According to David Jones of Florida Today, none of those four holds the key to whether Florida makes another deep run in the NCAA tournament.

That would be Patric Young, a 6-foot-9 big man who averaged 3.4 points and 3.8 rebounds during his freshman season in Gainesville.

“With so much talent around him, Young could very well be the most important player in the nation,” Jones wrote.

Now, I wouldn’t go ahead and say that Young is the single most important player in the country, but his production will likely determine how good the Gators are next season.

Coming out of high school, I overrated Young. It seemed his strength and aggression at both ends would translate well to the college level. Instead, Young’s weak back-to-the-basket game and overall lack of offensive skill hindered his development. He was still a solid defender and rebounder, but Florida needs more from him this year.

Young showed flashes of his potential last season, going for 12 points and five rebounds in only 19 minutes against South Carolina; going for nine points and five boards on the road at Vanderbilt; and coming up big against UCLA in the NCAA tournament, with eight points and four boards in only 16 minutes.

“If he’s able to be a double-digit scorer and major force as a rebounder, Florida could have a huge season,” Jones wrote.

Simply putting up gaudy numbers won’t cut it, though. Alex Tyus and Vernon Macklin all had solid scoring and rebounding production last season, but Florida’s frontcourt always had the label of being inconsistent and soft. Young needs to change that immediately.

He has the body and the work ethic to get that done. Most big men don’t have the non-stop motor that Young has, especially on the defensive end of the floor and the glass. He’s physical with opponents, and his athleticism gives him an edge over lunch-pail players who only do the dirty work.

While Florida’s perimeter players will get most of the attention next season – head coach Billy Donovan can conceivably start four guards and have them average a combined 60-65 points per game – it won’t be the guards that determine that fate of the 2011-12 Gators.

If Florida reaches New Orleans next March, there is little doubt most of the credit will have to go to Young.

Photo: US Presswire

Category: NCAAB
 
 
 
 
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