Tag:Duke
Posted on: November 16, 2011 12:13 am
Edited on: November 16, 2011 12:30 am
 

Night Court: K and UK take Tuesday's headlines

By Matt Norlander

Here’s everything you need to know about Tuesday’s slate of college basketball games …

(NOTE: We will file a Night Court each night this season. Follow @GaryParrishCBS, @GoodmanCBS, @MattNorlander, @JeffBorzello and @EyeOnCBB on Twitter to make sure it gets sent to you as soon as it's posted.)

Game of the day: Kentucky was a fun watch, but the night's best game was certainly Florida at Ohio State, which ended with an 81-74 win for the Buckeyes. Both teams looked nice. They played well and appeared in mid-season form. But OSU's just so good right now. No shame in the Gators falling the way they did; I'd love to see that rematch in the Sweet 16 or beyond come March. Jared Sullinger and Patric Young going against each other was the highlight of the 24-hour marathon for me.

Win to brag about: A man won his record-setting 903rd game Tuesday night. There is no more appropriate candidate for this category, ever, than that.

Loss to hide from: It was a road game, but still, Iowa State falling 74-65 to Drake doesn't mean good things for a Fred Hoiberg team that's trying to win with duct tape and specialty gadgets. Whatever ISU's trying to do, it backfired Tuesday night.

Player who deserves improper benefits: Let's just have a cop-out here and pick everyone on Kentucky's frontcourt. It's like going up against a bunch of helicopter blades when you play the Wildcats. Kansas was obviously outmatched going into that game -- but there were times when the Jayhawks looked like ignorant robbers running into a tripped bank job. They'd scurry into the paint and scurry right back out.

Player who does not deserve improper benefits: Parrish may give me grief for this, but for as good as Memphis looked, his boy, Tarik Black, only played 13 minutes and scored six points in the Tigers' swift win over Belmont. Black is believed to have potential that makes him the team's best player. Didn't see any of that Tuesday.

Numbers don’t lie:

  • 37. That's what Butler shot from the field, yet still won over Chattanooga, 57-46. It's going to win a lot of games like that this season.
  • 18. Michigan State's Draymond Green is the team's best player, and he's already showing his value, snaring an average of 18 boards through two games against two really good teams in UNC and Duke.
  • 59. That's what Memphis shot from the field Tuesday against Belmont. Tigers surprised me and a lot of people with how well they played. It was so good, I feel bad for thinking they'll never have a game as complete as that again against an opponent as good as Belmont.

Three other notable results

  1. Darrin Horn may not hold on to his job at the end of the year if the administration looks back and sees losses similar to the 58-53 one that happened tonight against Elon. Yep, Elon.
  2. Pepperdine 66, Arizona State 60. Sun Devils are a bad team, no doubt, but are we going to do this miserable Pac-12 spectacle again this early in the season?
  3. Weber State 73, Utah State 63. Utah State's rebuilding this year, but they did defeat BYU over the weekend at home. No luck on the road against Weber State, which only need 12 points out if its best player, Damian Lillard. Scott Bamforth led the Wildcats with 17.

Notes

  • We're really piling on here with the bad losses -- all of these are losses to hide from -- but Trent Johnson and LSU have to get served as well. The Bayou Bengals fell 71-63 to Coastal freaking Carolina.
  • You likely missed it, but Villanova could have very easily lost to La Salle at home. The Wildcats got the game to overtime and won, 76-69.
  • Texas took out URI at home, 100-90, but ... I dunno. The Longhorns looked off. About as off as a team can look when it puts up a Benjamin. I don't know what to expect from that team this year. I do know it's not elite, and the defense is nothing like what it was last year.
  • Vanderbilt didn't have John Jenkins due to a bad ankle, but beat Bucknell at home, 80-68.
  • I don't care how bad you are: you cannot score less than 40 points in a game if you are a Division I college basketball team. Yet Monmouth couldn't crack deuce tonight against George Mason, falling 71-39.

On tap: Long Beach State plays at Pittsburgh (9 ET, ESPNU); my man Nate Wolters and South Dakota State travel down to Georgia; Indiana has a tricky one on the road at Evansville, which beat Butler last week.

Photo: US PRESSWIRE
Posted on: November 15, 2011 9:34 pm
Edited on: November 15, 2011 11:20 pm
 

Mike Krzyzewski breaks record in ideal manner

By Jeff Goodman

NEW YORK - It was the ideal setting.

Bob Knight was courtside calling the game, in the world's most famous arena and with Tom Izzo as the guy on the opposite sideline.

Mike Krzyzewski made history in dramatic fashion on Tuesday night, in a sold-out Madison Square Garden, becoming the all-time winningest men's coach in Division 1 with his 903rd victory.

There was some nerves prior to the game by those in the Duke camp, whether Coach K would break his mentor's mark on Tuesday. Michigan State may not be a Top 25 team, but the Spartans are from from a cupcake. And if Coach K is regarded as the top active coach, Izzo isn't all that far behind.

The next opponent -- if Duke was unable to get past Michigan State - was Davidson at home on Friday night.

But now, with the help of Andre Dawkins' 26 points, it's over - and Krzyzewski can focus on the task of trying to get this Blue Devils team to where they are a legitimate Final Four contender.

And he can also pile on the victories.

He's probably good for at least another 27 this season -- which brings him to 930. Let's give him another five seasons - at about 27 per season - which would put him at in excess of 1,050.

That's a difficult number to chase.

One that may never fall.

Photo: AP
Posted on: November 14, 2011 10:25 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 10:31 pm
 

Coach K speaks with No. 903 on deck

By Gary Parrish

NEW YORK -- Mike Krzyzewski sat at the table in black Duke warmups that blended into a black Duke backdrop and immediately started talking about ... his past two games and various bumps and bruises that might affect practice. Seriously. It was funny. It was typical. But after a couple of minutes the Hall of Fame coach relented and actually acknowledged the giant record in the room ... in the most subtle and vague way possible.

"Excited about going to the Garden," Krzyzewski said. "It's going to be a unique event."

Yeah, I'd say so.

The Champions Classic is a first-year event designed to put four elite programs -- in this case, Duke, Michigan State, Kansas and Kentucky -- in the same building on the same night for the next three seasons with the matchups and location changing each year. It's a terrific idea. The doubleheader would be big on its own merit. But Tuesday night's doubleheader here at Madison Square Garden will be especially significant -- or, as Krzyzewski put it, unique -- because the most accomplished active basketball coach in the world will have an opportunity to become the winningest coach in NCAA Division I men's basketball history.

Coach K enters the game with 902 wins.

Barring an upset, he'll record No. 903 against Michigan State.

So a notable moment is (presumably) on deck. But if you were expecting Krzyzewski to focus on that on the eve of the game, you haven't been listening to him talk for the past three decades. Simply put, that's not K's style -- even if he's well aware of what he's about to accomplish.

"I'm not trying to hide the historical significance of this," Krzyzewski said. "But I can't put it ahead of what I'm doing."

And what is he doing?

"I'm just trying to figure out how to guard [Michigan State's Draymond] Green and keep [the Spartans] off the boards," Krzyzewski said. "I try not to think about those [other] kinds of things."

That's classic Krzyzewski -- always thinking in the moment, never getting too high or too low or too caught up in the big picture that consumes most of us. He lives life 40 minutes at a time. Or, more accurately, from one media timeout to the next. That -- in addition to his brilliant basketball mind -- is among the things that's allowed Krzyzewski to be consistently excellent while other Hall of Fame coaches come and go.

When Krzyzewski will go is anybody's guess.

But that day doesn't seem close.

He's only 64.

He seems sharper than his age.

So there are plenty of good years ahead of him, perhaps a fifth national championship, too. But for now the focus remains the same -- on the task at hand, on Draymond Green, on offensive rebounding and Michigan State in general. The rest of us can stare at 903. K's just trying to score more points than his opponent in a 40-minute contest.

"Nine-O-Three is gonna happen -- hopefully sooner rather than later," he said. "But I'm going into this game like any other game. I just want to win."
Posted on: November 12, 2011 6:37 pm
Edited on: November 12, 2011 6:42 pm
 

Krzyzewski ties Knight record with Saturday's win

By Jeff Goodman

It couldn't have set up any better.

Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski will go into Tuesday night's Champions Classic - a three-year round-robin event that also includes national powers Kentucky, Kansas and Michigan State - with an opportunity to make history.

With a victory at Madison Square Garden against Michigan State, Coach K will become the NCAA Division 1 all-time winningest coach.

Krzyzewski, whose team suffered a close call on Friday night in a one-point win over Belmont, tied Bob Knight's record of 902 on Saturday afternoon with a convincing win over Presbyterian.

Now he'll have a chance to make history with a win over Michigan State and another future Hall of Famer, Tom Izzo.

While Izzo's Spartans aren't ranked and are coming off a loss to top-ranked North Carolina at the Carrier Classic on Friday, this isn't exactly a layup for Coach K and the Blue Devils.

Krzyzewski will have a chance to break his old coach's mark in New York City with the nation watching. If it doesn't happen, it'll likely occur at home against Davidson four days later.

It's inevitable, but it would be cool for him to do it on Tuesday night in an event that was created to give a much-needed jolt to the start of the college basketball season.

The 64-year-old Krzyzewski, whose career mark is 902-284, has a chance to shatter the record if he goes another five or so years - as many close to him expect to be the case.

"He wants to put it out of reach," said one Coach K confidant.

Coach K moved into exclusive company - one that includes only John Wooden and Adolph Rupp - when he won his fourth national title a couple years ago.

He won't ever catch Wooden's 10 national championships, but the same may be said for his win total - when K ultimately decides to call it a career.

Photo: AP
Posted on: November 7, 2011 2:27 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2011 2:44 pm
 

Boeheim: Huggins has best shot of catching K

By Jeff Goodman

Seth Davis' show "Courtside" will have a special preseason edition tonight on CBS Sports Network at 9 p.m. ET.

Gary Parrish, Mike DeCourcy, Jon Rothstein, Jim O'Connell and myself were panelists for the show - and one of the numerous topics we discuss is Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski and whether anyone can catch him once he breaks Bob Knight's record of 902 and becomes the all-time winningest men's coach in Division 1.

Jim Boeheim is just 44 wins behind Coach K, but is about 2 1/2 years older than Krzyzewski - who enters the season with 900 career victories.

I posed the question to Boeheim, who turns 67 later this month, on Monday that maybe he'd have a shot - if K retires in the next few years and Boeheim sticks in out a few years beyond K.

"He's not returning anytime soon," Boeheim said. "I think Mike will coach another 10 years. I wouldn't be surprised at all."

The guy who Boeheim thinks would have a shot - if he took care of himself from a health-standpoint?

West Virginia's Bob Huggins.

"He's got a lot of wins - and he'll try and coach forever," Boeheim said. "He's about the only one out there who could possibly do it."

But even if the 58-year-old Huggins stays healthy, it's a stretch.

He has 691 career victories. Let's say he goes 12 more years (until he's 71) and averages about 25 wins per year (which is what he's averaged in his four years at West Virginia).

That would put him just shy of 1,000 victories.

Coach K has 900 right now and has been averaging about 29 wins per year - and he'll likely eclipse to the 1,000-win mark in 2014-15.

Photo: AP
Posted on: October 26, 2011 1:23 pm
 

Kyrie Irving back at Duke, books in bag

By Matt Norlander

Kyrie Irving is back at school because of the same reason Stephen Curry is, and so many other pro players are: a promise to family and a lot of spare time, thanks to the NBA lockout.

The 19-year-old No. 1 draft pick from last June could very easily be there, just under different circumstances, and getting his learn on had he passed on the NBA. But since he didn't, his choice makes for a story worth telling while NBA lawyers and union heads verbally clobber each other into November, perhaps beyhond.

CBS News reported (in, admittedly, a bit of a fluff piece) on Irving's decision during Wednesday's "The Early Show." Irving is one of reportedly 52 players taking college courses right now. It's an impressive number, yet that's not even a fifth of league players without degrees who have flocked back to academia. Since 20 percent of NBA players have their college degrees, that leaves nearly 340 without. Fifty-two is about 15 percent of degree-less ballers who are taking advantage of a once-in-a-career opportunity.

Is that higher or lower than you'd have guessed?

Here's the feature on Irving.

Category: NCAAB
Posted on: October 25, 2011 2:03 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Preseason Tour: Thoughts from Duke

By Jeff Goodman

Now that I've returned home and had an opportunity to catch my breathe from my Preseason Tour, I'll try and run through my thoughts from each practice I attended. I've already done so for Ohio State and North Carolina:

Here are my thoughts and observations from Duke:

1) These guys could struggle early since every single player will fill a different role than a year ago. Even Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski admits he's probably never coached a team like this one. "I can't even equate it to any other year," K said. "We have talented guys, but they haven't established themselves yet."

2) Miles Plumlee was the most dominant big man - and maybe even player - on the floor. He's gained weight in the offseason, but even more important was the acquisition of confidence and swagger. If he can sustain that, he could be a major factor for Coach K and the Blue Devils this season. By the way, someone let Doug Gottlieb know that this Plumlee is pretty darn athletic.

Season tips Nov. 7
3) No one alters what they do more effectively than Coach K. A year ago, the Blue Devils were perimeter-driven. This year the plan is for Duke to be tilted towards its big men, but I'd be shocked if this weren't a balanced group once freshman Austin Rivers gets adjusted to the college game.

4) Ryan Kelly was arguably the Blue Devils top player on their trip to China and I bought into the fact he'll be one of the team's top players, but now I'm not quite convinced. Kelly can make shots, but I think he'll be inconsistent this season. He's also suspect on the defensive end.

5) Speaking of defense, I'm concerned about Duke's perimeter defense. The trio of Seth Curry, Andre Dawkins and Austin Rivers isn't exactly known for their defensive prowess. All three want to score the basketball. That's why Tyler Thornton will likely see plenty of time because he's the most consistent guard on the defensive end. "We're not going to be a team that forces turnovers," Coach K said. "That's not their DNA. But we need to be a team that limits second shots and keeps people off the foul line."

6) Austin Rivers will be interesting to watch. He's got that swagger - and the ability to score the ball - but he'll need to be careful about disrupting team chemistry. He's a Type A personality on the floor who has the potential to rub his teammates the wrong way if he's not careful.

7) Freshman Alex Murphy will play this season. Duke has a need for a big wing - and Murphy fits the bill. He won't score much this season, but he'll be asked to defend athletic wings and will need to rebound the ball and do the little things.

8) Mason Plumlee may never live up to the hype. He looks the part - skilled, good size and also possessing the swagger. But the light still hasn't turned on and he hasn't yet become the dominant player that many felt he'd already have turned into.

9) The Seth Curry point guard experiment will be critical for Duke this season. Curry, like his older brother, is a scorer at heart. However, Stephen was able to make the transition to point guard at Davidson. Can Seth do the same at Duke? It's going to take time and will be far more difficult because Stephen had to carry Davidson while Seth has to balance scoring the ball and also keeping his teammates happy.

10) There aren't too many teams in the nation who have a more formidable perimeter shooting duo than Curry and Dawkins. These two can flat-out shoot the ball.
Posted on: October 20, 2011 9:27 am
 

Preseason candidates for Tisdale Award announced

By Gary Parrish

The United States Basketball Writers Association announced on Thursday its 12 preseason candidates for the Wayman Tisdale Award that annually honors the nation's top freshman. Three of the 12 -- Anthony Davis, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist and Marquis Teague -- play at Kentucky.

The full list is as follows:
  • Brad Beal (Florida)
  • Chane Behanan (Louisville)
  • Khem Birch (Pittsburgh)
  • Anthony Davis (Kentucky)
  • Andre Drummond (Connecticut)
  • Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (Kentucky)
  • Le'Bryan Nash (Oklahoma State)
  • Austin Rivers (Duke)
  • Marquis Teague (Kentucky)
  • Adonis Thomas (Memphis)
  • Josiah Turner (Arizona)
  • Cody Zeller (Indiana)
Ohio State's Jared Sullinger won the Wayman Tisdale Award last season.

Sullinger is the CBSSports.com Preseason National Player of the Year this season.
 
 
 
 
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