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Tag:Jordan Montgomery
Posted on: March 4, 2011 4:28 pm
Edited on: March 4, 2011 4:34 pm
 

NCAA taking a closer look at oversigning

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The hot button issue of oversigning is no longer just being examined by the media, the NCAA is taking a closer look into the issue as well.

The Division I Football Issues Committee has agreed to monitor a recent rule limiting schools to signing 28 recruits to a National Letter of Intent (NLI). Coaches have only 25 scholarships per year to give out but may sign up to 28 in case several recruits do not qualify academically.

The hot button issue of oversigning becomes especially newsworthy when schools have to tell recruits that they are no longer welcome because there is not a scholarship available. South Carolina, for example, signed 31 players to a letter of intent in 2011. Coaches usually try to keep players committed to the school but will re-route them to a prep school for a year or grayshirt them by having them enroll in the spring.

According to the NCAA release, the administrator of the NLI, Susan Peal, says the NLI's governing body does not support the grayshirting policy some schools use. If a player is persuaded by a coach to grayshirt and does not wish to so, their letter of intent can be considered void and they may sign when another school.

The new rule on oversigning, 15.5.1.10.1, and the rise in ways around it are forcing the NCAA to take a serious look at the practices schools use when signing football players.

“This rule has only been in effect for one year, and we want to take some time to see if that’s the perfect number," NCAA Division I Football Committee Chair Nick Carparelli said. “Certainly, the committee will continue to monitor it, and we can re-evaluate to see if there is a more appropriate number if necessary.”

The NCAA is not the only group of people taking action to combat oversigning as several high school coaches are becoming proactive in trying to stop the practice by outright banning colleges from recruiting their kids if they oversign. South Lake High School (Groveland, Fla.) head coach Walter Banks banned South Carolina after one of his players, Jordan Montgomery, was told he could not enroll because of the numbers crunch.

“I cannot look a kid and their parent in the face and say you can trust what a University of South Carolina coach says,” Banks told The State newspaper.

The NCAA also issued a staff interpretation on a rule which clarified that schools may not give a prospect a scholarship indirectly, such as through a coach or a friend. Players cannot receive any written scholarship offer prior to August 1st of their senior year but often receiver verbal offers from coaches.

Posted on: March 4, 2011 4:28 pm
Edited on: March 4, 2011 4:34 pm
 

NCAA taking a closer look at oversigning

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The hot button issue of oversigning is no longer just being examined by the media, the NCAA is taking a closer look into the issue as well.

The Division I Football Issues Committee has agreed to monitor a recent rule limiting schools to signing 28 recruits to a National Letter of Intent (NLI). Coaches have only 25 scholarships per year to give out but may sign up to 28 in case several recruits do not qualify academically.

The hot button issue of oversigning becomes especially newsworthy when schools have to tell recruits that they are no longer welcome because there is not a scholarship available. South Carolina, for example, signed 31 players to a letter of intent in 2011. Coaches usually try to keep players committed to the school but will re-route them to a prep school for a year or grayshirt them by having them enroll in the spring.

According to the NCAA release, the administrator of the NLI, Susan Peal, says the NLI's governing body does not support the grayshirting policy some schools use. If a player is persuaded by a coach to grayshirt and does not wish to so, their letter of intent can be considered void and they may sign when another school.

The new rule on oversigning, 15.5.1.10.1, and the rise in ways around it are forcing the NCAA to take a serious look at the practices schools use when signing football players.

“This rule has only been in effect for one year, and we want to take some time to see if that’s the perfect number," NCAA Division I Football Committee Chair Nick Carparelli said. “Certainly, the committee will continue to monitor it, and we can re-evaluate to see if there is a more appropriate number if necessary.”

The NCAA is not the only group of people taking action to combat oversigning as several high school coaches are becoming proactive in trying to stop the practice by outright banning colleges from recruiting their kids if they oversign. South Lake High School (Groveland, Fla.) head coach Walter Banks banned South Carolina after one of his players, Jordan Montgomery, was told he could not enroll because of the numbers crunch.

“I cannot look a kid and their parent in the face and say you can trust what a University of South Carolina coach says,” Banks told The State newspaper.

The NCAA also issued a staff interpretation on a rule which clarified that schools may not give a prospect a scholarship indirectly, such as through a coach or a friend. Players cannot receive any written scholarship offer prior to August 1st of their senior year but often receiver verbal offers from coaches.

Posted on: March 2, 2011 3:46 pm
Edited on: March 2, 2011 3:48 pm
 

Oversigning victim could land at Louisville

Posted by Bryan Fischer

After being told there was no room for him at South Carolina right before Signing Day, Atlatna (Ga.) defensive end Lorenzo Mauldin could end up at Louisville, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“That’s a pretty good option for me,” Mauldin told the Journal-Constitution. “I believe it’s better than prep school. I’ll already be there with the team and I could be playing football the next fall.”

Louisville and head coach Charlie Strong have offered Mauldin the chance to pay his own way for his first year at the school before coming on scholarship for the remaining years of his eligibility. If he qualifies out of high school, he would be able to come on scholarship right away.

Mauldin, who is currently in a group home, said he would be able to afford the tuition if he did not end up qualifying.

“I have supporters that are not alumni of Louisville that will help me out with that,” he said. “Playing football here [at Maynard Jackson HS], I’ve gotten to know a lot of people who want to help me. Plus, there’s the Pell Grant. So, yes, I think I can come up with [the money].”

South Carolina signed 32 players as part of their class of 2011. Mauldin and Groveland (Fla.) linebacker Jordan Montgomery were two players who were told that they would not be able to enroll this fall as a result of the numbers crunch.

According to Mauldin though, South Carolina assistant coach Lorenzo Ward said the Gamecocks would have room for him if he qualifies out of high school.

“He said if I get the score I will get the scholarship from one of the other boys who won’t academically qualify,” Mauldin said. “He tells me that’s his word. A man’s word is his bond, so I’m hoping that will be carried out.”

Mauldin is awaiting his ACT score and is expected to take the test at least one more time. April 1st is the last day a recruit can sign a National Letter of Intent but they can sign scholarship papers at any time before school begins.

Posted on: February 24, 2011 3:19 pm
 

No room at South Carolina for two recruits

Posted by Bryan Fischer

It’s supposed to be one of the best days in a recruit’s life, the day he signs his letter of intent. Signing those scholarship papers and Letter of Intent means something to a recruit, his parents and family.

Sometimes though, it gets taken away because of the business end of college football. That’s what happened to South Carolina commit Lorenzo Mauldin. The Atlanta (Ga.) area defensive end was told the day before Signing Day that he could not be put on scholarship this fall. Well, told would have been better than what really happened: a simple letter faxed to his high school.

“I kind of feel like I’ve been shoved away,” Mauldin told the Atlanta-Journal Constitution. “Then again, on the other hand, I realize that I wasn’t academically eligible and I understand that was on my part. And I can’t really use the times I’ve been through as an excuse for that. It’s all right.”

Mauldin and Groveland (Fla.) linebacker Jordan Montgomery were just two of South Carolina’s 31 signees told that there was no room for them. The railing against oversigning that occurred right before Signing Day? That was due in large part because of situations like Mauldin and Montgomery’s.

“We’ve handled it,” Gamecocks coach Steve Spurrier told reporters. “Hopefully they’re still going to be with us. That’s about all I can tell... We’ll see how it plays out down the road.”

The next step for both players is likely a prep school, the Journal-Constitution mentions Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia as a destination for Mauldin, before eventually enrolling in January. While both players will likely play FBS-level football, the circuitous route they took there is a cautionary route for some future recruits.

“I think everything will work out eventually,” Mauldin said. “Again, it’s better than nothing. As long as I’m playing football, I’m OK. I’m still getting my education. If I’m not playing football with my team right away, in the end, I will play with them eventually.”

Hopefully for the players, everything will work out in the end.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com