Tag:Barry Sanders
Posted on: June 14, 2011 11:54 am
Edited on: June 14, 2011 5:15 pm
 

The Class of 2012 and their famous fathers

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Father's Day is coming up on June 19 and in anticipation, CBSSports.com has declared it to be"Dad Week" on the site. Join us over the next few days as we take a look at some of the fatherly influence seen throughout the sporting world.

One place where dads are seemingly an omnipotent presence is in football recruiting. Plenty of players are sons of coaches, some have their dad at every camp they go to and a surprisingly large number of players let their father handle every detail of their recruitment. The class of 2012 in particular has quite a few players who have famous fathers and also happen to be top 100-level recruits. Here's five players who have the bloodlines but are making a name for themselves on the gridiron.

Andrus Peat, offensive tackle, Tempe (Ariz.) Corona Del Sol

Father: Todd Peat Sr. was an offensive lineman at Northern Illinois and had a six-year NFL career with the Cardinals and Raiders.

The younger Peat is ranked 17th overall in the MaxPreps Top 100 and holds well over 40 offers from just about every powerhouse in the country. He might be one of the players best prepared for the next level after receiving coaching from his father and having to play against his brother - Todd Jr., who signed with Nebraska in 2011 - on a daily basis over the past few years. Andrus recently visited Michigan and Notre Dame unofficially and is expected to narrow down his list of schools shortly.

Kyle Kalis, offensive tackle, Lakewood (Ohio) St. Edward, committed to Ohio State

Father: Todd Kalis, who played his college ball for John Cooper at Arizona State and lead the Sun Devils to the Rose Bowl in his three years as a starter. He played 103 games in the NFL over eight years for the Vikings, Steelers and Bengals.

Kyle was an early commitment to the Buckeyes and once Jim Tressel resigned, thought about decommitting. A phone call from interim head coach Luke Fickell convinced him to remain committed and he's really the foundation their class of 2012 is built on. Ranked 61st overall in the MaxPreps Top 100, he is the third best player from the talent-producing state of Ohio. The younger Kalis can play either tackle or guard, which his father excelled at in college.

Mario Edwards Jr., defensive end, Denton (Texas) Ryan, committed to Florida State

Father: Mario Edwards Sr. was a six-year NFL veteran and known mostly for his time with the Dallas Cowboys. The cornerback was also part of some successful Florida State teams in the late 90s but had his career hurt by injuries.

Edwards Jr. is physically not a whole lot like his father at 6-foot-4, 280 pounds. As big as a defensive tackle but with speed and moves like a defensive end, he is the top defensive end in the country and ranked fifth overall by MaxPreps. Edwards is literally following in his father's footsteps, though, after making a solid committment to Jimbo Fisher and the Seminoles earlier this year.

Deion Sanders Jr., athlete, Flower Mound (Texas) Marcus

Father: Deion Sanders needs no introduction but the NFL Hall of Famer would probably want one anyway. One of the great athletes of his time, Sanders played in the NFL for 16 years, most notably with the Cowboys and Falcons. "Prime Time" also played baseball for four teams and is the only man to play in both the World Series and the Super Bowl.

Neon Deion's son is not as highly recruited as some of the others on this list but he's quite the playmaker for his high school team. With the same blazing speed as the elder Sanders, Deion Jr. is a wildcat quarterback/wide receiver and a threat to score anytime he touches the ball. His height might keep him from playing major college football (he's 5-foot-7) but he already has an offer from Houston and will likely pick up a few more with a strong senior campaign.

Barry Sanders Jr., running back, Oklahoma City (Okla.) Heritage Hall

Father: NFL Hall of Famer and one of the greatest running backs ever, Barry Sanders Sr. was a 10 time All-Pro and won the Heisman Trophy in 1988. He played his entire career with the Detroit Lions after they took him with the No. 3 overall pick.

The 5-foot-11, 190-pound prep running back has film that is simlar to his father (but is much, much clearer thanks to modern technology). A shifty back who can make cuts at full speed, the younger Sanders has plenty of potential at the college level. Holding offers from Alabama, Auburn and Florida State among others, it looks like he will go out-of-state and not head to his father's alma mater of Oklahoma State despite the Cowboys recruiting him heavily.

One name that might ring a bell in the class of 2013 is Ray Lewis III, son of the Ravens linebacker with the same name. He's a running back who put on an impressive showing last season when he racked up 504 total yards and two touchdowns in a big win.

Check out some highlights of Barry Sanders Jr. (above) and his father (below) and see how they compare:








Posted on: May 28, 2011 12:41 pm
 

Top 10 Tom Lemming recruiting misses

By MaxPreps' Stephen Spiewak

MaxPreps/CBS Sports recruiting analyst Tom Lemming has identified many NFL superstars and college standouts over the last 30 years.

From Peyton Manning to Randy Moss, Beanie Wells to Seantrel Henderson, Lemming has consistently highlighted future stars from the high school ranks.

However, Lemming's track record is not flawless, as he and others have missed some players who quietly developed from unheralded recruits to some of football's biggest stars.

1. Barry Sanders

Sanders attended North (Wichita, Kan.), where he closed his high school career with a strong senior season. Lemming thought he was solid but unspectacular. He lacked good size and top-level speed, and didn't catch the attention of many college coaches.

"Every school in the country turned him down. He visited Northwestern, and they turned him down. Oklahoma State took him mostly because they missed out on everyone else," he said.

Sanders' son, also named Barry, has had a totally different recruiting experience. He's currently the No. 10 player in Lemming's 2012 Top 100.

2. Drew Brees

One of the top quarterbacks in the NFL flew entirely under Lemming's radar as a prospect hailing from Westlake (Austin, Texas).

"I missed Drew Brees completely," Lemming said. 

According to Lemming, Jim Chaney recruited the undersized Brees to Purdue after he was passed on by many bigger programs, including the Texas Longhorns.

"Nobody really went after him. He's from Austin and Texas turned him down," Lemming said.

3. Brett Favre

Favre, one of the greatest players at his position ever, played in an offense at Hancock (Kiln, Miss.) that was ill-suited to match his skill set, Lemming recalled.

"He could throw the ball through a brick wall, always could," he said. "His dad [and Hancoack North Central football coach] had him in an option offense. He didn't have the production," Lemming said.

The recently retired Favre made Lemming's magazine, but was not considered a future star.

4. Kurt Warner

Beating the odds and outperforming expectations were a common theme in Kurt Warner's career, and it began in high school at now-defunct Regis (Cedar Falls, Iowa).

The future Super Bowl MVP did little to lead anyone to think he'd play on Sundays one day, nevermind reach the pinnacle of the sport. Lemming was one of the many talent evaluators who underestimated Warner.

"I didn't have him in my magazine. I completely missed him," Lemming said.

After Regis, Warner headed to Northern Iowa, where he started only as a senior.

5. Terrell Owens

Now second in all-time receiving touchdowns, Terrell Owens was far from a ballyhooed prospect coming out of Russell (Alexander City, Ala.). Lemming wasn't sure how Owens' frame would project at the next level.

"He was very thin and didn't get recruited at all," he said. "He had to go to JuCo, and then he grew."

Owens, who would go on to become a third-round draft pick out of Tennessee-Chattanooga, never appeared in Lemming's magazine.

Read more of this story on MaxPreps 
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com